The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

french bread

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jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

For the love of bread,  I woke up 5 am,  with 4 hours of sleep just to see this bread rise and baked.  I didn't regret.  


Adapted from Bernard Clayton's New Complete Book of Breads,  I tried my hand again on this Pain de Campagne Poilane.  In addition,  I also tried using a claypot to bake this.  


I'm quite satisfied with my results,  the crust was crispy,  the texture is amazingly soft unlike those others that I tried.  I would have liked more holes,  but I think what matters is the taste.  The taste is good,  a little sweetness, if I changed to sourdough,  it probably has better effect.


My 3 days experiences are here with recipe:  http://sites.google.com/site/jlohcook/home/breadmaking/pain-de-campagne-poilane


 



By the way - after it cooled, the boule cracked a little and seem to have shrunk. Is that normal?


 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,


I'm just going to start catching up on my freshloaf blogging...  Here are some French bread loaves from 1/4/2010...  Enjoy!


Tim





 

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

My attempt of french dimpled rolls last night , I would say turn out ok.  But I felt that I had to proof longer,  this is one thing I can't seem to get it right. The dough is a little dense, or is the roll suppose to be like that??


I went into a bakery to buy their rolls just to compare,  there's lots more holes,  the rolls felt much lighter.  As for the taste,  it was a little more salty than what I normally like,  I'd probably reduce it.  


For more details,  see attached.  


http://sites.google.com/site/jlohcook/home/breadmaking/french-dimpled-rolls


French Dimpled Rolls


 


French Dimpled Rolls - Baked

Kroha's picture

100% Whole Wheat French bread -- is it worth the effort?

December 4, 2009 - 12:48pm -- Kroha
Forums: 

Hello everyone,


I tried baking my first French bread today.  The recipe came from Laurel's Kitchen book, and it is a 100% WW bread, straight dough that ferments at cold temperatures.  I am wondering if someone has made this bread before successfully, and whether or not you liked it.  Also, if someone has another outstanding recipe, or a reference to a recipe, for such bread, I would appreciate it.  I am also wondering if WW French bread is an abomination -- i.e. is it something that is never found in France that whole grain lovers just made up?

phxdog's picture

Reformed Recipe Slave

May 11, 2009 - 11:15am -- phxdog

This weekend I baked 4 French Bread boules (a recipe by Danielle Forestier from a PBS segment with Julia Child). Iv'e always had good success following this recipe, but these loaves were great. They did not collapse during the final proof. I scored them in one stroke rather than my normal hacking several times. The crust was golden, crisp and actually "sang" as I pulled them from the ovens (I had begun to think you guys were all high when you mentioned this could happen). The crumb was perfect, and they tasted great.

ericb's picture

Pain moulé

December 14, 2008 - 11:45am -- ericb

About ten years ago, my wife and I participated in a study-abroad program in Strasbourg, France. We were reminiscing today when the topic of bread came up (of course!). Every day on the way home from class, I would pick up a loaf of "Pain Moulé" from the Boulangerie for my girlfriend and her flat-mates. 

amyt's picture

French bread and pie crusts

November 22, 2008 - 6:52pm -- amyt

WOW! Made my first hand-milled loaf... and my arm'd tired but we are HOOKED on the taste!!!


Well, always looking for a challenge, I'm now wondering if I dare work hand-milled into the family THanksgiving I'm hosting (I know, nothing like last minute planning). I'll be doing French bread with the appetizer, which I usually make with KA all-purpose flour... anyone made French bread with hand-milled? Should I use hard white wheat? Would it make more sense to mix hand-milled with store-bought?

tgw1962_slo's picture

Pain de campagne

November 6, 2008 - 7:21am -- tgw1962_slo

Hello,

 

Has anyone here tried the recipe for "Pain de Campagne Poilane" from Bernard Clayton's "New Complete Book of Breads"???

I made the starter last night, and followed the recipe exactly as it is in the book (page 226)

This morning I looked at the starter. It seems to be fermenting quite nicely, but hasn't risen even the slightest. And is this starter supposed to be

so watery? It just seems rather watery and thin for a starter. And the author makes no mention as to how it should be until after the "sponge" is

added.

 

fredsambo's picture
fredsambo

So it has been a while since my last post, I guess it was a busy summer, LOL.

 

I made some simple baguettes today. I did a 4 hour poolish and then mixed up an ordinary french bread recipe (water, salt, flour, poolish). I then put the dough in the refrigerator, since I wanted to go to bed (9pm). My wife took it out at five this morning and this is what it looked like at seven, when I got up:

 

First Rising

 

I cut the dough into four somewhat equal pieces and shaped them into logs; I set aside the fourth piece for my next batch.

Preshape

 

Then I let them sit on the "bench" for an hour.

Covered with a dish towel.

 

After pacing around drinking coffee for the longest hour ever, I flattened out all of the air...

Flatten

 

...and rolled them into baguettes.

Baguettes!

 

Now, I usually cover my french bread with a big pot, to emulate steam injection, but alas, these baguettes were too long! My solution was to start off at 550 degrees preheated for an hour and then carefully pour 1/2 cup of water into a small cast iron skillet, closing the door quickly. I think the key is keeping the oven above 450 degrees the whole time, since the evaporated water will make the temp drop dramatically. My water never stopped boiling and the steam cloud upon opening the door was impressive. CAUTION: A lot of steam comes out of the oven when first opened up, don't go sticking your face down there!

Skillet

 

After proofing for another hour I scored and then brushed them with plenty of water. Once they hit the stone I turned the temperature down to 500 degrees for four minutes, then removed the skillet and turned the temp down to 450 for the remaining time.

Ready to go!

 

I am pretty happy with the results, although they could be darker, but they taste wonderful!

Baguettes

 

I am making a country style next, with the old dough I saved from this batch!

 

Happy Baking!

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