The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

french bread

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moma's picture
moma

Today I baked for my daughters nursery group. Two of the most perfect fluffy and light loaves.

I made the dough yeasterday at 1300 and put it in the fridge ( in a glass blow with a lid on) this morning i heard the top blow off and I knocked down the dough. At midday I cut the dough in half and shaped it.

Im pretty satisfied with the spring of the bread, as this is by far the most succesfull attempt I have made! I can now see why it is important to handle the SD easy in order not to deflate it.

the crumb is soft. Very suitable for toddlers with only a few teeth :)

 

edit: bread is made from wheat flour, whole wheat, SD, salt, dollop of sirup/oil, salt and water. (and sesam seeds)

willchernoff's picture
willchernoff

I think i'm finally getting the hang of making french bread. I won't say my recipe/technique is perfect, but I finally feel confident enough to share bread with freinds. Here's some pictures of what I've been up to.


 


 


 


I've been enjoying these results, but I can't seem to get an even oven spring. That is, where I slash the dough either pops too much or too little while baking. Any ideas how to get a more consistent pop?


 


Details on what I actually do: http://wchernoff.wordpress.com/2010/07/24/feel-that-oven-spring/

em120392's picture
em120392

Hey guys! I'm taking a high school internship course called W.I.S.E. which allows a student to study about and to work in their desired trade. For my W.I.S.E. project, I chose Artisan Bread Baking as my topic.


I have been baking bread since I was thirteen, and I wanted to take this course to further my knowlege and gain work experience in a bakery. Next year for college, I plan to attend Johnson and Wales University, which specializes in the Culinary Arts. I thought that this project will prepare me for my future career, for I am going to be working in an Artisan Bread Bakery.  Also, I found that during this project, I can challenge myself to comlete the BBA Challenge. Starting in January, and ending in May, I hope to bake my way through The Bread Baker's Apprentice.


My brother, Evan, who's 24, and I decided that we would begin a blog to chronical both of our experiences through BBA. Evan lives in California, and I live in New Jersey, and we thought it would be interesting to note the different challenges and sucesses of the recipes.


Anyway, I hope that our blog will interest some fellow bakers, or fellow BBA challenge participants! We'd love to have your commentary, suggestions, or recommendations for new recipes to try!


http://bakingacrosscountry.wordpress.com/


Thank you for taking the time to read!


-Emily (18)


 


ps. Here is my post for French Bread.


(It might make more sense if you read my W.I.S.E. Project Proposal, as well as previous entries.)


 


This is my blog entry for Reinhart's French Bread:


I skipped ahead on the BBA challenge. I wanted to go through the book in order, but I didn't have time to bake bagels this weekend. They take two days to make, and I wasn't home enough to bake them. This is a difficulty in bread baking at home-although bread is easy to make, one must tend to the dough according to the starter, risings, and baking, which can be time consuming and inconvenient.


My mentor, Mr. Esteban, enjoys savory breads rather than enriched, sweet breads. I could have moved on to brioche, but I thought he would have appreciated a crusty, slightly sour French loaf more, and I have been itching to try French bread. Also, I felt like I was teasing him about my bread baking- telling him about it, but not making anything for him. I hope he enjoys the baguettes!


Reinhart begins with a pate fermente, an overnight starter which lends the final dough more flavor. It is simple- it combines flour, water, salt, and yeast into a rather stiff dough. I let the dough rise for about an hour, and then refrigerated overnight.


The next morning, I let the pate fermete warm up, and cut it into smaller pieces so I could incorporate it into the final dough. Like the pate fermente, the bread contained the same proportions of ingredients. After mixing with flour, salt, yeast, water and pate fermente into a ball, I kneaded it for about 6 minutes, or until I could easily use the windowpane test. Out of pure laziness, I kneaded the dough in the machine, rather than by hand. I feel more connected to the dough when I knead by hand, but, I was tired and didn't want to dirty the counters.


After the dough is kneaded, it rests for about two hours, to rise for the first time. Then I shaped the baguettes like I thought I should. I spread the dough out, and folded it into thirds like letters. I proceeded to elongate them into their proper shape. However, after making them I went on Youtube (great idea, huh?) and watched the proper way. After folding in thirds, you're supposed to create tension on the outside of the bread by rolling it up in two separate "folding/rollings." Afterwards, you gently seal the bread with the heel of your palm and then proceed elongating. Next time, I guess.


I let the dough rise for the last time for two hours. I do not have a lame yet, so I cut the slits with a pairing knife. On two of the loaves, I cut rather perpendicular, leaving the slashes not very attractive. However, on the third, the slashes were much more pronounced because I used a 45 degree angle.


After I took them out of the oven, I could hear the crusts crackling. I was so excited-they looked promising. After they had cooled, I sliced a piece. The crumb was rather dense, not holey and airy like I imagine a true baguette. I was rather disappointed, but the flavor made up for it-it had true bread flavor.


So, I don't know- maybe I'll make these again. I really like the use of the pate fermente and it was very cool to shape baguettes. However, the crumb was really disappointing, and for taking two days and substantial hands on time, I felt cheapened.


 

houstonwong's picture

Buns/rolls made with French bread dough

December 1, 2010 - 11:07pm -- houstonwong

My sister loves dinner rolls/buns. So I figure I'd use it as a chance to really try out French folding. My previous attempts have been somewhat half-hearted. But this time, I thought I’d really do it right, focusing on stretching and trapping air.


 


For the formula:


Strong Canadian white flour 13.3% protein


75% hydration


0.5-0.6% instant yeast


2% table salt


 

mivigliotti's picture

Reinharts french bread recipe

October 3, 2010 - 9:39am -- mivigliotti

I just started baking and I bought Peter Reinharts artisan breads everyday. I am making the classic french bread and i had 2 issues: firs one was he says to make the dough the day before and put in fridge overnight, which I did. today was the day i woe up tokk my dough ou and had to cut into 10oz portions and shape to a batard. The problem I have is   shaping them into batards I feel cold dough was not letting me seel the dough and as I was rolling the m I felt it was coming apart at the seems. Should i Have let the dough rest at room temp first before shaping?

BellesAZ's picture

Anyone ever bake Clayton's French Bread with beaten egg whites?

August 31, 2010 - 2:37pm -- BellesAZ

Tonight I'm making a nice lemon chicken picatta and I thought I'd do a quick Italian bread.  I dusted off my Bernard Clayton New Complete Book of Breads, just because I haven't opened it in so long and thought I could find a quick recipe within it.  Instead, I became fixated on a recipe for French Bread made with beaten egg whites.  I was curious - French bread made with egg whites?  It didn't call for an overnight ferment, although it certainly could have had one, I suppose, but it fit the bill.. looked easy enough and was quick.

teketeke's picture
teketeke

 I found this recipe on Cookpad. ( Japanese)  It is very good to eat this in summer using juicy fresh tomatoes, fravorful fresh basil with your own baguettes. I love it without doubt. This recipe was posted by suru-zen. Thank you, suru-zen!!


 My favorite's Bruschetta recipe:




Ingredients  



*Large fresh tomatoes ( Peeled and diced)

2

*Basil

6-7 leaves

*Garlic (grounded)

1 clove

*Olive oil

4Tbsp

*Parmesan cheese

2Tbsp

*Salt

2 pinch

*Freshly grounded black pepper

1-2 tsp

French bread ( sliced and toasted)

 1  baguette

Cream cheese

As much as you want

1. Put * all ingredients in a medium bowl and mix lightly and refrigerate it

for 1 hour.

2. spread some cream cheese on the french bread and put some * tomato mixture on them.

Sprinkle parmesan cheese a little bit  and ready to serve.

Thanks to SylviaH & Sagharbormo, I could have another delicious version of bruschetta. I cut the baguettes lengthlwise and pulled  some soft crumb out and broiled them until golden brown. After that, squeezed 1/2 ripen fresh tomato in the crumb,  spread some cream chease over on it, and put  my *ingredients on, and sprinkle some olive oil and parmesan cheese ( I like cheese :))    It tated very good.  Thank you, folks!

 

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