The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Fougasse

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greedybread's picture
greedybread

Fou…Fou…Fougasse….Fresh from the oven…

Carrying on my crush on lovely Richard Bertinet, I decided I really should try his Fougasse as it looks so easy!!

Very yum!!

This recipe is from his first book “Dough”.

It seems to be quite simplistic, but for people who have never baked bread before, he gives you delicious recipes, confidence and a full belly..

And before you know it, you are onto the complex buggers like Gubana or Panettone!!

“You are on your way baby…”

I like to call it the breaking in book…If I have a crappy baking week, I choose one of his recipes to give me a boost!!

Very fougasse!!

looking like the mask in Scream!!

This bread does though remind me of the mask in Scream.

Can you see it? Or am I mad?

Anyhow enough blathering…you will not believe how easy this recipe is!!

LETS GET YEASTY!!!

What will you need?

15g dried yeast

500g Strong Bakers flour

10g Salt

350 mls water..

Easy peasy dough…

Warm the water and add in the dried yeast and allow to become frothy.

Combine flour and salt and give it a mix, then add in the yeasty water and form a soft dough.

Knead for about 10 minutes until smooth and elastic.

Place in lightly oiled bowl and cover, standing for an hour.

Scream!!

ready to bake..

Preheat oven to 250 celsius.

Sprinkle semolina on the baking tray paper  or onto the baking stone but if doing on the stone, do 5 minutes before bread goes in:)

Turn dough out on floured bench/ board.

Cut into 4 pieces .

Be very gentle and roll out or use fingertips to spread out the dough as my pictures above show.

There is no right or wrong shape really.

Then slice 4-5 cuts in the dough and pull apart.

Place on baking tray. and sprinkle with a little flour or semolina.

cooling…

Open oven, give a quick mist on the walls, place the tray in the oven and shut the door.

Turn the heat to 230 celsius and bake for about 10-12 minutes or until golden brown.

Remove from oven and cool on racks.

look at it!!

ready to eat!

Someone has had a bite!!

And another…almost gone.

I will try a more complex recipe that I have, and let you know how that goes.

A wheaty one too maybe nice….maybe I could slip in the wholemeal again:)

Great bread for dips and salsa’s.

ENJOY, ENJOY, ENJOY!!

Gorgy!!

ejm's picture
ejm

There really is a difference. And right now we’re loving fougasse. So much that we have entirely rejected the idea of making focaccia.

When I first read about fougasse, I thought it must be virtually the same as focaccia. I dismissed making fougasse because I’d made focaccia. They were the same, after all.... 

Our fougasse craze started after reading about Chad Robertson’s fougasse in “Tartine Bread”. (It’s a GREAT book!!) But because of still being certain – what with my terrific retention skills when reading – that fougasse was simply French focaccia, I used the ingredients for our focaccia recipe along with Robertson’s shaping and baking method to make our first fougasse.

Amazingly, not only is the fougasse quite different from focaccia (even using the same dough), but both of us have decreed that fougasse is superior to focaccia. At least that’s what we think right now.

Because fougasse is baked on a stone instead of on an oiled pan, there are more crispy bits. Not too crispy though… it’s juuuuust right! Of course, it can be cut with a knife but we think that fougasse tastes better torn apart.

After the first couple of times making fougasse, I noticed that in his book, Chad Robertson suggests using baguette dough for making fougasse. ie: no oil in the dough itself.

So we tried that too. And it was good. Really good.

We’re not sure if it was better than fougasse made with focaccia dough. Just different. It’s the shaping, slashing and baking that will produce the characteristic (I think) fougasse texture and flavour.

Yes. We love fougasse so much that we can’t stop making it! I’m thinking that once you start making it, you won’t be able to stop either.

I am very pleased to be the host of October 2011's Bread Baking Babes’ task. Here is what I wrote to the BBBabes:

So far I’ve made fougasse using focaccia dough or baguette dough; plain with oil drizzled on before; plain with no oil drizzled on until just after baking; with poppy seeds added to the dough; with black olives; plain drizzled afterwards with oil infused mushrooms.

All were a little different but all were equally delicious. Of course, I’m hoping that you too neeeeeeed to make fougasse and will now bake along with us.

To receive a Baking Buddy Badge to display on your site: bake fougasse in the next couple of weeks and post about it (we love to see how your bread turned out AND hear what you think about it) before the 29 October 2011.

Please read here (this is a link) for details on how to participate.

-Elizabeth

(This is a partial mirror of a post about fougasse on blog from OUR kitchen)

wally's picture
wally

With a new baking job I've been overwhelmed to the point of hardly having time to enjoy posts on TFL let alone contribute.  But as the 4th has approached I found a day off to recharge my batteries, revisit some breads I love to bake, and try an experiment in dinner rolls involving ciabatta dough.


First, revisiting old friends - in this case Hamelman's mixed starter pain au levain, and, fougasse. 


Over time I've found that the subtle flavors that are imparted by a mixed starter of my everyday levain and rye levain, combined with a small introduction of whole wheat flour to the final dough, make this pain au levain my go-to bread of choice.  There is noticeable sourness in the baked loaf, yet not so overwhelming that it obscures the other flavors imparted by the mixture of grains and starters.


   


(A little crackly crust for David S here)


.          


Plus, I have to admit, it's just plain fun to be able to use both starters simultaneously in constructing one dough.  Usually I find myself grabbing one or the other starters out of the fridge (now that it's unbearable summer here in D.C.) and staring somewhat ruefully at the one which goes unused.  So Hamelman's mixed starter sourdough not only satisfies my taste buds, but assuages any sense of guilt over favoring one levain over the other.


The fougasse I haven't baked in some time, but I had promised compatriots at my favorite pub that on Saturday I would appear with snacks in hand.  And what better way to share than with a niçoise olive and sea salt fougasse! 


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    The beautiful leaf shape was shortly admired and much more rapidly dismantled by my fellow pub mates!  I've tried these with a variety of additions - roasted garlic, sun-dried tomatoes, and traditional anchovies.  In any incarnation, I find them quickly devoured.  And let's face it, they are a 'fun' bread because of their distinctive shape.


My third bake on Saturday was with a traditional ciabatta dough of 72% hydration.  But instead of creating the usual 1 lb. loaves I decided to cut the dough into 1.5 oz increments and bake dinner rolls with them - ciabattinis as I like to call them. 



The dough makes for a quick and easy dinner roll that can be bagged and frozen once cooled, ready to be pulled out and thawed as needed.  Most of my dinner rolls contain healthy doses of butter, so I find this very simple roll - just flour, water, salt and yeast - to be a nice change and a wonderful sop for any dish that contains oils or juices.


      


The other eventful recent occurrence was a delightful 2-day workshop at King Arthur Flour in mid-June on wood-fired oven baking, taught by Dan Wing who, with Alan Scott, wrote the 'bible' on wfo's - The Bread Builders.  It was an eye-opener for me in that my conceptions of wfo's as mainly pizza makers were thrown out the window as we not only baked wonderful breads, but cooked equally wonderful meals on them. Those who are interested in reading more about my second 'excellent adventure at KAF' can find my recounting here.


Happy baking and Happy 4th of July to all!


Larry

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Davesmall's recent postings of his Fougasses (Fougasse with refrigerated dough ) inspired me to finally make this bread from Provence and the Côte d'Azur. I first had this bread in Lourmarin, in the Vaucluse. My wife and I visited an old high school French teacher of mine. His French wife has a family connection with that village going back generations. We spent a delightful day on a motor tour of the area, including several stops at bakeries, because each had different specialties. We ate the fougasse with a delicious daube de boeuf for lunch that day.


I made these fougasses from the formula in Michel Suas' Advanced Bread and Pastry. it uses a levain but is also spiked with a small amount of instant yeast. Per Suas' formula, I added some rosemary to the dough, fresh from the garden. We dipped it in EVOO with a bit of balsamic vinegar and had it with salmon cakes and a salad of tomatoes, cucumber and radishes with a mustard vinaigrette. A lovely Navarro Pinot Gris was a perfect accompaniment, although a rosé would have been more traditional with this bread.



Fougasses proofing



Proofed, ready to bake (450ºF for 20 minutes with steam)



Fougasses


Fougasse is a crust-lovers' bread. It is very crunchy but with enough tender, highly aerated crumb to absorb dipping oil. I enjoyed dipping it in the salad dressing more than the oil and balsamic. I ate 3/4 of one myself at dinner, demonstrating my customary restraint.


David

leucadian's picture
leucadian

Fougasse is my favorite easy sourdough: I love the extra crust and the ease of pulling it apart. I made these with my version of Pierre Nury's and Zolablues Light rye: 65% hydration 5% rye, 20% levain (approximate) and 1.8% salt. The levain was kept in the fridge for a couple of days before I made this bread. Overnight retard following minimum stretching/folding. Rolled in poppy seeds and fennel seeds, brushed with olive oil, baked on stone 500/400 degrees F.



 

bshuval's picture

Raymond Blanc's Kitchen Secrets: bread

March 30, 2010 - 1:09am -- bshuval
Forums: 

In the UK there is a fantastic TV show called "Raymond Blanc's Kitchen Secrets". It's a delightful program presented by the wonderfully enthusiastic Raymond Blanc. His passion with food is thoroughly addictive. In each of the series' eight episodes, Raymond Blanc concentrates on a topic and showcases several related recipes. Some are quite simple, some are exceedingly complex, and Raymond does them with such grace and ease it is a joy to watch. There's a genuine feeling of honesty throughout the series.

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