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News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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aliciar's picture

need help w/ village baker recipe

May 30, 2012 - 3:55am -- aliciar

Hello, I would greatly appreciate help with this recipe or getting a new recipe to achieve what I am looking for, which is a great crispy, chewy crust, but nice and airy inside.  I am almost there with the Village Baker Recipe, making the poolish night before and adding the flour and using the autolyse method of rising.

1st batch - next morning added flour, etc to poolish and let rise 1 hour and folded,

peteryoung's picture

Splitting seams on Baguettes

April 16, 2012 - 5:47am -- peteryoung
Forums: 

Hi, I am Peter Young in Nottingham UK

I have been making bread for a while, but I am currently struggling with baguette seams splitting.

I think it's because I'm not sealing the seams properly during shaping (and perhaps the ends, but then

I usually just roll the ends to a point).  I've heard a bit about 'tension' but I am not sure how to achieve it.

Any suggestions would be welcome.

 

 

 

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Yay! Thank you! After much research and tips and narrowing down the problem (via videos from King Arthur flour and seeing their dough in each step), I figured out that I wasn't kneading it correctly in the bulk fermentation step. I was doing the push-down and quarter turn method. No folding or stretching, because I wasn't even aware of that at all! Interesting how even the end result in bread can point to a problem much earlier in the process. With just folding and stretching, the dough became dramatically different, and the bread held its nicely curved lofty shape during baking! yay!!!!!!!

Now on to invest in a thermometer...

rcayot's picture

Folding and Proofing

January 9, 2010 - 3:34pm -- rcayot
Forums: 

My first post after lurking for some time.


I have been making a lean rustic bread, soemthing like a french bread.  I have made it about 10 or so times. My question is along the lines of folding, and proofing.  The recipe states that I shouldallow the first fermentation to go for 90 minmutes, then fold once and then divide, shape proof etc.


 

mountaindog's picture
mountaindog

This is in response to Trailrunner's questions on a mixing discussion over at Hansjoakim's blog here on a fantastic-looking crumb he has on his Hazelnut bread.


Lately I seem to get best results with a combo of warm shorter bulk ferment with frequent early folding and long cold final proof. No mixer, no kneading with flour, no repeated French-folding. (warning, this could change as soon as I read of a better method, so please take with a grain of sea salt!):



  • Hand mix all the ingredients with a large dough whisk in large bowl (incl. salt)

  • Cover and let rest (autolyse) for 30 min. (I know you are supposed to leave out the salt but I find it easier to mix everything initially if not using a standmixer)

  • After 30 min. rest, use plastic dough scraper to fold dough onto itself in the same bowl, just like what Mark does in his video here. I count to about 100 as that takes me just about 3 min., and that has seemed to develop the dough well.

  • Next round up the dough with scaper and place it into a clean, lightly spray-oiled lidded dough bucket - or for large-size doughs where I double or triple the formula, I use a big square clear plastic food service container with lid.

  • Let the dough sit for 30 min. (preferably at 76F location), then do a single stretch & fold as per Hamelman: if dough is in smaller bucket, tip the dough out onto a lightly spray-oiled counterstop, stretch it out into a rectangle, and letter fold it onto itself once, rotate 90 degrees, letter fold again, and put it back in the bucket for another 30 minutes. If dough is in big square container, just fold it right in the container and turn upside down when done.

  • Repeat step above 2 more times for a total of 3 folding sessions spread 30 min. apart. Then leave the dough to finish bulk-fermenting at 76F, usually for another 90-120 minutes until just doubled (my home-made starter is not that fast a riser).

  • Next shape loaves, then I place the shaped loaves in a 45-50F location (my unheated mudroom) to retard overnight or 12 hrs min.

  • After cold retarding I place the proofed loaves in my room temp (65F) kitchen while I preheat my baking stone for 45 min. and bake with steam right after that, usually the loaves are proofed enough after all that time retarding, and the oven spring is great.


Here are results of a less slack dough (65% hydration pain au levain 10% whole wheat), not huge holes like you'd get with a very wet dough, but large enough and evenly distributed, and very flavorful crumb, chewy but not gummy:



I still need to try SteveB's double-mixing technique he describes here. If anyone sees any error in my ways with how I've been doing this, I'm all ears! I'm sure I'll revise this after I read Advanced Bread and Pastry, due in soon.

mcs's picture

the latest video from The Back Home

August 29, 2008 - 7:10pm -- mcs
Forums: 

The Fresh Loafers, This is the latest video where I'm working with some higher hydration (68%) doughs. Both of the breads are 'originals', and if you'd like to see the recipes you can probe around here for them or email me at the bakery. Anyway, I hope you like it. I decided to forego music this time and just add commentary. Nothing witty, strictly business.

-Mark
http://TheBackHomeBakery.com

 

 

nosabe332's picture

how does rise time work?

March 16, 2008 - 11:55am -- nosabe332

i have a general question to all those experienced bakers.

 

let's say a recipe says to let the dough rise until doubled, or about 2 hours. then punch it down/fold andd let rise again.

what if my schedule is such that i have to do the folding before the dough has doubled in size? can i compensate with a longer 2nd rise?

 

i'm making a ciabatta and i see that the ponsford recipe calls for folding at 20 minute intervals for an hour. how would this differ from doing all 4 folds at the same time and letting it rise for an hour thereafter? 

mcs's picture

Kneading and Folding video- Español

March 12, 2008 - 10:52am -- mcs
Forums: 

Hey everybody. This is the same kneading and folding video as before, but with Spanish subtitles for the commentary, thanks to fellow FreshLoafian, Joe Martello. I have an Italian and German version in the works, and am looking for someone to transcribe it in French. If you're interested, I can send you the English version in Word, then you can put the matching French sentences underneath the English. Thanks.


-Mark
http://TheBackHomeBakery.com


 


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