The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

fluffy

wayne on FLUKE's picture
wayne on FLUKE

I have been wanting to try the Tangzhong method for a while when I want soft, fluffy bread. I also was very impressed with txfarmer's demonstrations of kneading technique to get soft and fluffy (and everything else she does!). I finally got around to it. I made up the Tangzhong yesterday and put in fridge overnight. There are good videos of this process on youtube, but it is easy. Just 5 parts water, 1 part flour (by weight) and medium heat, stirring till it thickens (149 degrees F).

This morning I mixed the dough from Karen's Kitchen in my Bosch compact. I kneaded (mostly on speed 2) for around 30 minutes total, trying to follow txfarmers instructions. I finally got something close. I shaped into 6 - 65 gram hot dog buns and 4 - 95 gram burger buns, two knotted, two not. ;-)

Soft and Fluffy.

Burger Buns close up.

Not sure how much of the texture is due to Tangzhong method vs extensive kneading.

Submitted to yeastspotting.

wayne

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Another Simple White Loaf.  I got this from this Japanese website:  http://kneader.jp/recipe/14.  Thanks to Koby.  It was a light,  fluffly bread,  just like those you find in those Japanese Bakery.  I doubled the recipe here.

What I find interesting is the method:  1.  The Biga Mix -  it includes sugar first.  its quite a high content of yeast,  I probably would like to try a little less instant yeast.  This only requires 10 minutes although I extended it to 30 mins because of the temperature here.  2.  The baking -  3 different degrees within the span of 35 mins baking time.  Here's the details in this site:  https://sites.google.com/a/jlohcook.com/jennycook/latest-postings/simplewhiteloaf

What do you think of this method?

 

 

Salilah's picture

Too fluffy and soft crust - solutions?

May 19, 2011 - 1:37am -- Salilah

I made a version of Susan's Norwich Sourdough

http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2007/07/08/my-new-favorite-sourdough/

with a variation of a higher percentage of starter:

400g white (very strong) rather than 450g
60g light rye
250g warm water rather than 300g
280g starter (mix white & rye) rather than 180g
10g salt
(i.e. same percentages flour and water if you take starter at 100% into account)

cranbo's picture
cranbo

So in a recent thread I posted a recipe that I based on a bread someone had seen on TV. I just did my best guess, based on provided ingredients and my own experience. 

I figured I should post the results, because it was mostly theoretical, but I believed it would work. The goal was yeasty, soft, fluffy bread, and use of a preferment. 

Here's the recipe, makes eight (8) 92g rolls/buns, or one good-sized loaf of bread...hence BreadBuns!

  • 100% hydration starter (sourdough or not) 100g (26.50%)
  • All purpose flour 375g (100%)
  • Water 218g (58%)
  • Brown sugar 38g (10%)
  • Salt 10g (2.65%)
  • Yeast (instant) 12g (3.30%)
  • Melted butter 26g (7%)
  • FINAL DOUGH WEIGHT (g) 778g

First, make a 100% hydration starter with 50g flour, 50g water and a pinch of yeast, mix, cover and leave at room temp for at least 6 hrs (or use some existing sourdough starter). In this case, I used some starter that I had around. 

Combine starter with remaining ingredients. This is after 1 minute of mixing at low speed. 

Mix with dough hook for 6 minutes total at KitchenAid speed #2 (low speed); this is the end result: soft, supple, quite smooth and satiny. 

Flatten, then roll into log and/or shape into ball and let rise for 1 hr in warm place, covered. 

Shaped and ready for rising...

In the bucket, ready to rise

After a 1 hour rise, it's doubled.

I decided to shape into 92g rolls, placed in a greased 9x13 pyrex dish:

Cover and let them rise in a warm place for about 1 hour, til doubled. Preheat oven to 400F

Bake for 23 minutes at 350F on middle oven rack.

Here's how they look after 10 minutes, just starting to get a hint of browning.

After the full 23 minutes, they're looking nice and brown. 

Remove from oven, carefully remove from pan and let cool on rack about 10 minutes before devouring. 

Crust and crumb are soft, light, tender and fluffy as expected. I think they could use a bit more brown sugar though, a touch more sweetness for this kind of bread. 

I like to store these in a Ziploc plastic bag to maintain that fluffy softness. Enjoy!

Dragonbones's picture

Looking for a light, fluffy white fig walnut bread recipe

June 24, 2009 - 1:37am -- Dragonbones
Forums: 

We have a local bakery called FlavorField in Taibei, Taiwan that used to make a nice light, fluffy white bread with figs and walnuts, nothing at all like the dense, sweet loaves I see when I search for fig bread recipes. These are small, golden brown batards, lightly dusted in spots with flour, a soft crust, cream-colored fine crumb which is chewy, not sweet, and then a sprinkling of chopped figs with a few walnuts. It keeps well for a few days, but does not taste rich. Very nice with coffee in the morning or as a light snack.

They have now stopped making it.

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