The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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honeymustard's picture
honeymustard

I have known for a while now that I would have to face my fear of wet doughs. Yes, fear. Absolute fear.


I am very good at breads that are relatively dry, and the only doughs that I've worked with that are wet weren't nearly as wet as the recipe I found here - Floydm's Daily Bread.


To be honest, I had a vague idea - at best - at what I was doing. I made a whole wheat poolish, and the rest of the flour was organic spelt. For good measure and texture, I added 1/4 cup flax seeds. I baked on a stone as directed.


Spelt & Flax Bread


For having so little idea about what I was doing, I feel pretty fantastic about the results. The rise was reasonably good, and the texture was perfect. I would hope for a slightly better crumb next time. But I'm not going to be picky after my first try.


Also, I wanted a harder crust, but I think that has to do with a) my stone and b) a better method of steaming.

moldyclint's picture
moldyclint

Made a couple of loaves today that went over well with the Taiwanese in-laws, and that I am pretty happy with.  My usual whole wheat sourdough base, with ~30% added high gluten white flour, and about 1 1/2 cups of rye kernels (soaked overnight, then brought to a boil and then left to soak another few hours) and about 1 cup of flax seeds (soaked overnight), and ~1+% salt.  Probably about 9 cups flour total, plus the extra seeds, making a couple of large loaves.  My sourdough, which I have been keeping in the fridge 100% of the time since coming to Taiwan, hasn't yet developed much of a sour flavour (which is fine with everyone but me), but is working well to leaven my doughs. 


This time, I started with ~3 cups of starter, adding 3 cups of flour the night before and putting in the fridge.  After letting that warm up in the morning, I added the final 3 cups of flour, along with the rye and flax.  Bulk ferment for another 2 1/2 hours, split, stretch, fold, shape, and proof for about another 2 hours.  As you can see, precise measurements and replicability are not too high yet on my priority list.  Will likely try this one again and actually keep track of masses...


 




emily_mb's picture

Newbie Q on Hydration and Additions: Flax, oat, wheat germ, wheat bran, polenta

June 15, 2010 - 10:15am -- emily_mb
Forums: 

I am a newbie who loves to experiment.  From my reading and experimentation I have learned that successful breads roughly have a 3 to 1 ratio of flour to liquid.  And that dough can tolerate a certain amount of "additions" such as nuts, raisins, sundried tomatoes, etc.  Most recipes that call for additions have 1 to 2 Tbs. per cup of flour.  So, my question is. which of these things function as flour (have to be counted towards the hydration) and which ones are additions? 

veggie num nums's picture

I have extra flax, oat bran and sesame seeds (all fresh and in sealed packages)

June 10, 2010 - 3:20pm -- veggie num nums
Forums: 

I stocked up on grains and seeds but I'm running out of room in my freezer. I would be happy to share. I have enough to send to two people. Everything is Bob's Red Mill brand and still in the original packages, and not expired.


If anyone is interested, let me know.


 

subfuscpersona's picture

How Much Flax Seed Meal Can I Add To a Sourdough Formula?

May 19, 2010 - 6:23pm -- subfuscpersona

I would like to add coarsely ground flax seed meal to a sourdough bread dough. I have read that too much flax seed meal can adversely affect gluten development (due to enzymes in the flax seed).


What would be a recommended amount in baker's percent? How high could I go?

guyshahar's picture

Can I use flour milled from seeds in a coffee grinder?

July 27, 2009 - 2:10am -- guyshahar

Hi



I am new to home baking and trying to bake gluten free (not yet made a great loaf, but still trying).



I have a simple coffee grinder with a rotating blade at home, but it grinds grains very finely.  I have whole Sorghum, Quinoa, Hemp and Flax seeds that I would like to use as flours in my bread.  I have heard that this is a very good way of ensuring that the flour is fresh and of a good quality and nutricious.  


I have a couple of questions about this:

manfredtex's picture

Local Breads - Dreikornbrot

October 13, 2008 - 10:41am -- manfredtex

I have baked the Dreikornbrot twice and figured out pretty quickly that the water measurements were just plain wrong.  I think the total water used should be only 300g or about 1 1/3 cup.  With 1/3 cup of water going to the seed soaker and 1 cup of water for the flour.

My real question is if this recipe is really intended to make 2 9 x 5 loaves.  During both tries the final bread in the 2 loaf pans is only about 1/2 of the way up the sides of the pan.  It really tastes great, a nice dense crumb, but the slices are only about 1.5 inches tall.

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