The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Eric Kayser

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DonD's picture
DonD

Background:


David Lebovitz, the celebrated American food blogger based in Paris has raved about Eric Kayser's Pain aux Cereales on numerous occasions, even proclaiming it to be perhaps the Best Bread in the World. A lot of bread aficianados from all over the world have made the pilgrimage to Paris to sample it and have posted photos as well as detailed description of this particular bread on the internet.


  Kayser's Pain aux Cereales from Lebovitz's Blog


I have the Eric Kayser's '100% Pain' bread book and the recipe for his Pain aux Cereales is included. However the photos, the ingredients and the formulation listed do not match the descriptions of the bread sold in his stores. After all, his bread empire is built on the originality and quality of his products, so who can blame him for not divulging all his secrets?


A couple days ago, I decided to formulate my own interpretation of Kayser's Pain aux Cereales based on my compilation of information gathered on the internet and relying loosely on the recipe in his book.


Formulation:


Flour Mix:


- 250 Gms KA Organic Artisan Select AP Flour


- 250 Gms La Milanaise T90 High Extraction Flour


Liquid Levain Build:


- 25 Gms ripe Liquid Levain (100% hydration)


- 50 Gms Flour Mix


- 50 Gms Spring Water


Seed Mix:


- 2 Tbs Golden Flax Seeds


- 2 Tbs Brown Flax Seeds


- 2 Tbs Yellow Sesame Seeds


- 2 Tbs Millet Seeds


- 2 Tbs Poppy Seeds


Final Dough Mix:


- 450 Gms Flour Mix


- 325 Gms Spring Water


- 125 Gms Liquid Levain Build


- 1/4 tsp Instant Yeast


- 10 Gms Grey Atlantic Sea Salt


- 1/3 of Seed Mix (toasted in a non-stick pan)


Procedures:


1- Prepare Final Levain Build and let ferment at room temperature until triple in volume.


2- Mix Flour and Water and autolyse for 30 mins.


3- Add Levain, Yeast and Salt and knead in mixer w/ dough hook on low speed for 4 mins.


4- Add the 1/3 toasted seed mix and incorporate into dough with dough hook for 30 secs.


5- Partially ferment dough at room temperature for 2 1/2 hours with stretch and fold in the bowl every 30 mins.


6- Retard dough in refrigerator for 18-24 hrs.


7- Divide dough into 2, preshape into ball and let rest 1 hr. Shape into batard and proof on couche for 1 hr.


8- Transfer loaves to peel, lightly mist with a vaporizer and sprinkle with remaining untoasted seed mix.


9- Score and bake at 440 degrees F with steam for 12 mins and 20 more mins at 390 degrees F on convection without steam.


  


I kept the dough hydration higher than normal at about 77% to compensate for the seeds absorbing some of the moisture from the dough during fermentation. The dough was very responsive with just the right amount of elasticity and extensibility. I got good oven spring, the cuts opened up nicely and the crust was thin and crackly and had beautiful caramelization. The roasted seeds on the crust were colorful and fragrant and glistened from their oil.




The crumb was cream colored, translucent, soft and slightly chewy and speckled with crunchy seeds. The flavor was complex from the interplay of the nuttiness of the seeds and the slight tang of the levain.


  



Was it the Best Bread in the World? I would not say so but a darn good bread nonetheless.


Happy Baking!


Don


 


 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,


Just wanted to share with you some baguettes that I made last night...  Nothing fancy, but I think they turned out pretty nice except for the slightly burnt bottom on a few of them...  These are 65% hydration using a firm 60% hydration sourdough starter and active dry yeast...  I think it's a variation on Eric Kaiser's Baguette Monge, but using American flours, and a firm sourdough starter instead of a liquid one...  It's probably closer to Dominique Saibron's baguettes that do use the firm sourdough starter... 


Also, the 2nd one from the right is the one I cut into.  It slid off my peel before I even opened the oven door.  I caught it before it hit the ground, but in doing so stretched it out, and ruined my slashes...  It tasted fine, but looks a little skinnier than the other 7...  Posting the recipe below.  Enjoy!


Tim






Ingredients:


Total Dough Weight: 2850g


Yield: 8 x 15" baguettes at 280g weight after bake


75% AP - 1140g (Whole Foods 365)


20% BF - 304g (KA Bread Flour)


5% Graham Flour - 76g (Bob's Red Mill)


20% Firm Sourdough Starter - 304g (straight from fridge fed day before)


65% Water - 988g


2% Kosher Salt - 30g


0.4% Active Dry Yeast - 6g (1 1/2 tsp)


Directions:


Day before:


Feed sourdough starter, or convert liquid starter to firm starter.  Leave on counter at room temp for 4 hrs, refrigerate until ready to use.


Bake day:


1.  Measure out all ingredients.


2.  Place water and sourdough starter cut in pieces in large mixing bowl.  Then, add all dry ingredients at once, mix with wooden spoon until all is combined in a shaggy dough, knead in bowl with wet hands for about 5 minutes, cover and autolyse for 30 minutes.


3.  After autolyse, knead dough 50 strokes in bowl with wet hands, cover and let rest for 30 mins.


4.  Turn dough in bowl, cover and let rest for 30 mins.


5.  Turn dough in bowl, cover and let rest for 1 hr.


6.  After rest, dough should have doubled in size.  To test, poke dough with a floured finger.  If impression remains, dough is ready.


7.  Divide into 8 pieces approx 356g, preshape and cover with cloth and plastic, let rest for 15 minutes.


8.  Final shape baguettes, place 1st 4 in (lightly floured) linen couche on a tray, place in plastic bag, and retard in refrigerator for 30 minutes.  Shape remaning 4, and proof for 30-45 minutes in linen couche.  Also place these 4 in large plastic bag so they don't dry out.  Arrange 2 baking stones in the oven along with a steam pan, and preheat to 500F with convection.


9.  When oven reaches 500F and 1st set of baguettes are proofed, carefully turn baguettes onto wooden peel, slash 5 times, place in oven.  When all baguettes are in, pour 3/4 cup of water into steam pan (use oven mitts), close door and bake for 8 minutes at 480F with convection, rotate and bake at 450F with convection for another 12-15 minutes or until internal temp reaches 210F.  Take out 2nd set of baguettes from fridge while these are baking.


10.  When first set of baguettes are out of the oven, preheat oven to 500F with convection.  When oven reaches temp, bake the 2nd set.


11.  Cool for 1 hr before eating.


Notes: I preheated my oven to 550F with convection...  This probably caused a few of them that were started on the bottom stone to have slighly burnt bottoms...  Also, my firm sourdough starter was started with organic rye flour, and then at some point converted to AP or bread flour.  Now it has some graham flour in it...  I feed it every few days with either 50g AP, and 30g water, or 100g AP and 60g water, leave it on the counter for 4 hours, feed it again, and return it to the fridge.  I usually use it 1-3 days after the last feeding...


Also, I have been seeing a few thread suggesting that you can bake breads in cold oven without preheating it to 50F to 100F above your desired bake temp...  I just have to say that that is bull-crap! at least for making baguettes, which need that initial high heat from the oven/baking stone to get the full oven spring, and rich carmelized crust...


 Submitted to Yeastspotting on 2/9/10

DonD's picture
DonD

Background:


In Eric Kayser's book "100% Pain", the Foreword written by the celebrated French chef Alain Ducasse waxed poetic about Kayser's Tourte de Meule, which literally translates to "Millstone Pie" and which is basically a Country Miche made with High Extraction Organic Stone Ground Flour and a Liquid Levain.


 Eric Kayser's "La Tourte de Meule"


In my last blog, I mentioned that I was able to bring back 3 types of Organic Flour from the "Meunerie Milanaise" in Quebec, the same mill that supplies Daniel Leader's "Bread Alone" bakery in Woodstock, New York. In addition to the basic Type 55 AP Flour, I also bought their Type 70 and Type 90 Organic Stone Ground flours. Having secured the proper ingredients, I decided to give EK's Tourte de Meule a try.


EK's original recipe:


- 700 g T 80 Organic Stone Ground Flour


- 300 g T 65 Organic Stone Ground Flour


- 200 g Liquid Levain


- 2 g Fresh Yeast


- 25 g Sea Salt from Guerande


- 700 g Water


Since my flours have slightly higher extraction, I decided to use half T 90 (83% extraction) and half T 70 (81% extraction) Organic Stone Ground Flour. I also halved the recipe to 500 g total Flour Mix and converted the yeast amount to 1/8 teaspoon Instant Yeast (for 500 g total flour). I used Grey Sea Salt from Guerande and Deer Park Spring Water. My Liquid Levain build was 100% hydration using T 70 Flour.


I modified the procedures slightly from Kayser's instructions. He calls for mixing all the ingredients, fermenting the dough at room temperature for 2-1/2 hours with stretch and fold at 15 minutes and then at 1-1/2 hours, shaping and proofing in banneton for 2 hours before baking.


My Procedures:


- Combine the Flour Mix and Water and autolyse for 30 minutes.


- Add the Liquid Levain, Yeast and Salt and knead with a dough hook on slow speed for 2 minutes.


- Do 10 stretch and fold in the bowl at 45 minutes interval 4 times.


- Ferment the dough at room temperature for 1 hour and retard in the refrigerator for 24 hours.


- Shape the dough into a Boule and let the dough rise in a lined Banneton for 1 hour.


- Bake in preheated 440 degrres F oven for 15 minutes with steam and at 410 degrees F without steam for 30 minutes.


Results:





The loaf had great oven spring. The exterior had a deep amber color and was nice and crusty. The smell was sweet and caramelly. The crumb was open and medium soft with a slight chewiness. The crumb color was beige with fine specks of bran, similar to a whole wheat crumb. The flavor was wheaty, tangy with a touch of acidity. When sliced and toasted, it took on a whole new dimension. The taste of toasty grain came out with an extra dose of sweetness. Overall, I was very pleased with the result.


Don


 


 


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Baguettes "Monge"


Baguettes "Monge"

 

I got a (very) few actual crackles in the crust! A thrill!

Baguettes "Monge" Crust

Baguettes "Monge" Crust

Baguettes "Monge" Crumb

Baguettes "Monge" Crumb

Janedo posted a recipe for Eric Kayser's Baguettes "Monge." See http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/7031/kayeser039s-baguettes-quotmongequot for the recipe, photos and discussion.

I made these with some modifications last weekend, but I wanted to try the recipe sticking as close to Jane's instructions as possible. Last night, I fed my liquid starter with Golden Buffalo and, today, made these baguettes. My conversations with King Arthur Flour indicated that they intended their "French Style Flour" to be an approximation of French Style 65 flour, which Jane's recipe specified. I had a couple of pounds, so that is what I used.

When I mixed the dough, it seemed way too dry. I added about 20 ml more water. The dough was still dry, but I didn't want to deviate too far from the recipe, so I left it at that. The only other change I made was to bake at 500F for the first 7 minutes with steam, then removed my skillet and turned the oven down to 460F. Total bake time was 25 minutes.

I am much happier with my baguette slashing. I knew what to do in theory. This time the main change I made was to focus better. I think I got pretty nice bloom. The crust was the closest I've gotten to date to a classic crisp, crackly baguette crust. I think the higher oven temperature was necessary for this, at least in my oven. The crumb was actually better than my first effort, which was with higher hydration, but it was still not as open as I would have liked.

The taste is very nice. Nothing wrong with it. But it does not have as much sweetness or complexity as I would have liked. I'm not sure this recipe with its very short fermentation can deliver optimal baguette flavor. (Of course, I haven't tasted Jane's baguettes!).

The quest for a better baguette continues, but this is my personal best to date.

David

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