The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

dough

Shutzie27's picture
Shutzie27

There is something almost primal about home-baked bread.

For millennia, mostly women (but I'm sure some men too) across every single continent have engaged in a fairly painstaking process of patiently grinding wheat or corn into flour, finding and adding just the right amount of water, and kneading, kneading, kneading until, finally, on a flat rock in the sun or atop an enclosed fire somewhere the cornerstone of the human diet was finished. How could they have known how much water to add, or that one must knead and not beat or grind the dough? Perhaps bread was born within us and simply came out.

Maybe it emerged in the form of a baguette, or a tortilla, a loaf, a pita, a crust or a stick, but it was bread and it was being made every day by somebody somewhere.

Humans engaged in this long process, over and over again, for their children, their mates, their communities or themselves. To celebrate, to mourn, to barter or to heal. In honor of their religion and sometimes, even, bread was made to renounce religion. Bread was at once precious and yet universal. It was for the rich to enjoy, the poor to need and the destitute to yearn for.

Environment, time and later wealth would play their defining roles, of course.

In France the nobles feasted on croissants, a rich bread because it required eggs for browning and a scandalous amount of butter.

Meanwhile, in Tuscany, the bread had to last and was often stale. Not to be denied any pleasure, the Tuscans soaked the leftover slices of the long, narrow loaves in olive oil and topped with basil and tomatoes and re-warmed the bread over the fire. Today, you can pay up to $25.00 for a plate of that--only we call it bruschetta and the bread isn't usually stale (though it may have been deliberately left out overnight to harden for authenticity).

French toast, or as I grew up calling it, arme ritter (poor knight) was fed as a dessert dish to knights. It contained key ingredients wealthier noblemen were likely to have, such as milk and eggs. As such, it was considered a bit of a luxurious dish and by serving it the noblemen were paying the knights proper respect...that being said, it was also appealing because it was a dish that was still relatively cheap to provide. In fact, French toast is sometimes called "The Poor Knights of Windsor."

Rich, poor, warring or at peace....everyone ate or at least needed bread. Of all the foods in the world, it is bread that became synonymous with currency the world over (lettuce is a distinctly American term).

All of which is well and good, of course, and lends to a deep sense of comfort when baking bread, but doesn't have a whole lot to do with why I bake it.

No, I think it would be far more accurate to say that I love dough more than I love baking bread.

I love the dough.

I love the way yeast proofs in warm water, as though the water, at just the right temperature, was holding some eternal secret of life and by adding the yeast and waiting I discovered it. Dough is love, and love is the essence of life.

I love how it transforms from a sticky, gooey sludge into a smooth, warm and elastic dough with just a bit of patient coaxing from my fingers. That my small, weak and unskilled hands could produce such an strong but elastic substance amazes me just a little bit each and every time.

I especially associate yeast dough with love. Like love, yeast dough is pliable but strong, but also requires just the right amount of attention to become something life-sustaining. Given too much kneading or water or flour, it can be ruined in an instant and become stiff, dry or cracked. Sometimes, just sometimes, like particularly strong love, if the dough has become too watery and is getting away from the baker, it can be fixed by slowly and carefully adding flour.

Both yeast dough and love can be coaxed, cajoled, rolled, folded and rocked into shape, but never, ever forced.

You have to truly feel the dough to understand it, and if you are only going through the motions you may end up with bread that is edible, but not bread that is also joyous. Yeast dough, like love, will give back whatever you put into it, and if you don't pay attention you will end up with nothing but a useless, heavy mass and a lot of wasted time you can never get back.

Yeast dough is warm from the inside out and, without even touching it, yeast dough can grow and grow until it doubles or triples in volume and can seem unstoppable. Anyone who has ever secretely loved another can surely relate.

The warmth of yeast dough doesn't come from an oven or a grill, but emanates gently from within it. Cover the bowl, come back in an hour or even just twenty minutes and--magic!--twice as much dough as there was before.

And like love, even punching it down a bit and reshaping it won't stop the way it will grow from within.

Some breads, just like some loves, need a bit more attention even when they're in the oven.

A baguette, for example, has to be perfectly misted while baking.

A challah bread (and is there any bread that celebrates life, family, love and tradition more? And no, I'm not Jewish, but it really is one of the richest breads in so many ways) won't settle for being shaped but must be braided.

The quietly demanding sourdough requires no less than at least three days of your time for the starter and, even then, can be a bit fickle.

And the croissant is a downright diva, demanding days of preparation and folding process akin the welding and hammering that goes into a genuine Samurai sword (only slightly less than 100 layers). It is a deceptively innocent-looking bread that requires a remarkable amount of skill.

Yes, some breads require the attention of a lover, others are as demanding as children, still other are as low-maintenance and accepting as an old friend, and still other breads ultimately require the patience, work and understanding that love for family and in-laws are exceedingly likely to require.

But all of them, if done properly, are unquestionably worth every second.


Naturally, after taking a golden-brown or spice-speckled or rich dark bread out of the oven, I'll treat myself to just a bit of it.

I'll allow myself that first moment of basking in the rich, comforting warmth of the oven, still lazily lingering within the welcoming center of the loaf. And I'll revel in the barely-there hint of sugar or natural sweetness that is woven tightly amidst the magical sponge of flour and yeast.

When the mood strikes me, sometimes that gentle, warm center is hugged by a protective crust with just enough crunch to turn that very first bite into an experience of its own, a sharp but simple contrast of texture that elevates the flavor exponentially.

But after that, really, the bread becomes almost a thing of the past. Baked, the loaf is now something that I take pride in having made and while I genuinely look forward to sharing with others, something is gone. I am forced to confront the fact that the towel-wrapped testimony to my secret baking obsession is not why I ever began making it in the first place.

mbutcher's picture

Dough ball going slack durring kneeding

July 14, 2010 - 9:46am -- mbutcher

So here I am minding my own business enjoying making 30 loaves of bread and all of a sudden my dough goes slack after 5 min of kneeding. Dough holds a ball untill then but goes slack and holds to the bottom of the bowl. Recipe calls for 10 grain soaker to be added after forming the dough gluten. Any suggestions?

purpleronie's picture

Using fridge with dough

May 21, 2010 - 8:37am -- purpleronie

Hi,


I am shortly going to be running a small scale trial of breads and pastries for a visitor centre cafe on the island where I live. I am a home baker, and have tried various recipes, and catered for functions where I have baked repeated batches of dough so they are all ready to go in the oven one after the other. I know you can put dough in the fridge overnight, and then remove it in the morning, and leave for couple of hours before its ready for baking.


What happens if its not left long enough to warm up?

Newfieguy's picture

Transfering dough to the stone - CALLING ALL PIZZA MAKERS!

May 20, 2010 - 10:01am -- Newfieguy

OK so this past week I make a wonderful ciabata with the recipe going around in here.


It turned out heavenly!  I am still a newb when it comes to making bread other than my own bread so I was very happy to see this one turn out so well!  I tried to post a few pics but managed to botch that up some how as well!

southern grits girl's picture

Bread Dough in Fridge

April 25, 2010 - 7:22am -- southern grits girl
Forums: 

I'm fairly new to bread making and three days ago I made some roll dough with flour, water, sugar, salt, butter. I used my bread machine on dough cycle. After taking it out, I had a change of plans and placed it in fridge. Today I took it out and made rolls. Put them in the oven to rise like I always do, and they were beautiful. Placed them in oven to cook and first thing my husband said was "What are you doing with the vinegar, it stinks to high heaven". The dough DID smell like sourdough when I was making the rolls, is this normal?

ron45's picture

My dough had too much memory

April 5, 2010 - 3:40pm -- ron45
Forums: 

I've baked two versions of the blueberry cream cheese braid bread. The first was very slack and came out great. The second was about perfect as far as dough handling and consisency. It both were all white enriched bread flour, King Arthur or one of those varieties. 


The second batch. I wanted less dough to filling ratio but trying to roll out the dough thin was a joke. I'd roll it out and it would bunch up or shrink back about 25% of what I'd gained. I could not get the dough to roll out thin in the time I had to do it. 

welling's picture

Bourke Street Bakery Book

March 28, 2010 - 4:03am -- welling
Forums: 

I'm not a professional baker but i have been successfully baking as an amateur for a couple of years now. In this time I have learned a few basics, such as that strong white flour can absorb water of 60% of the flour weight (approximately). That is, 3/8 water to 5/8 flour. I know that this is flour dependent, but only within a couple of percent.

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