The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

croissants

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freerk's picture

should I tightly clingwrap my croissant dough?

November 21, 2010 - 6:00am -- freerk
Forums: 

Question: In the Julia Child-video for making croissants, Esther (the french lady who does the baking in the video) wraps her dough very tightly in cling film before she puts the fridge to rise.


 


I'm doing the same thing when making croissants, but I actually have no clue what this does to the process. It feels counter intuitive somehow: why am I not giving this dough all the room it wants and needs to grow?


 

TheresaB's picture
TheresaB

I just finished making croissant dough for the very first time with information I could find on the internet. Wow. Making croissant dough is tough, and I'm still I'm not sure I did it correctly. What I just made tastes good, though it's reminiscent of a bread-child between a buttermilk biscuit and a croissant.


I regret leaving them in the refrigerator overnight after folding the dough, I should've let them rise to something larger. Also I think I put too much milk in them and didn't kneed the dough as much as I should have done. They're tasty, surprisingly! I am absolutely shocked they turned out edible and that those 17 hours of creation, refrigeration and proofing didn't go to waste!  


I combined a few recipes posted on these forums to create this Frankenstein deliciousness (Croissants, but with more milk than originally planned):



 


 


I put some almond paste in these (Same dough):



I haven't tried the bear claws yet, I'm too excited that I didn't burn them to oblivion, or that they're not hard as rocks that I had to post this and share these creations to the world. Also, I'm sure the almond paste filling resembles a hot lava that would scorch the tongue for at least the next 20 minutes.


Hooray!


Tips? Thoughts?


 


*Just realized I should post this as a blog.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

In Quebec the one thing I'm always really looking forward to is, of course, French cuisine. For our daughter's graduation in Montreal we put up in a fairly nice hotel near campus, and went down for breakfast with pleasant expectations.

Heading straight for the croissants I noticed their lack of crispness, cold and tired they were sitting in the display. Well, there was the toaster, and innocently pretending not to understand the warning: "Pas des croissants" ("Nix comprengg!") I revived my lackluster pastry (no smoke alarm).

Back at our table I garnished my croissant with some butter and jam and took my first bite. At once red lights started flashing as my taste buds yelled: "Beware of cardboard!!!" In utter disbelief I took a second bite, and there it was - a total blandness and the faint but unmistakable taste of shortening!

In two days we will be home in Maine, and next time we visit Portland we will go to our favorite breakfast place: "Mornings in Paris", where they have the most wonderful, buttery, crisp croissants...


 


 


 

RobinGross's picture
RobinGross


Croissants made with 100% wild yeast (captured in Paris).  5 rises over 2 days and enough folding and turning to create 55 layers of butter and dough in the final croissant.  Tasty too.

SallyBR's picture

Need help with 10th Wedding Anniversary

March 1, 2010 - 9:10am -- SallyBR

Next Sunday, will be our 10th Wedding anniversay! 


I've been thinking of making something special for our breakfast, and the idea of croissants popped in my mind, as we met in France and croissants (as well as pain au chocolat) were always part of our Sunday morning, right after a nice run

gothicgirl's picture
gothicgirl

Posted on www.evilshenanigans.com on 11/25/2009 here


Ready for something a tad more advanced?  It takes time to make, but it is SO worth it.


Butter Croissants


I fell in love with croissant making a few semesters ago in my Laminated Dough class.  Bread making is among my favorite things to do in the kitchen, but making laminated doughs (doughs with butter sandwiched between the layers) tops that.  It takes time to make laminated dough and the process has taught me a lot about being patient in the kitchen.  Some things can't be rushed.


Butter Croissants


Making croissants at home is not a hard thing to do.  Yes, it will seem intimidating the first time when you see all the steps all at once, but  it is really just three stages, which makes the whole process less intimidating for me.


Stage 1 - Mixing the dough and making the butter block


Stage 2 - Marrying the butter with the dough and doing your three turns (folding the dough into thirds, like a letter, and turning 90 degrees)


Stage 3 - Make-up and baking


Butter Croissants


A few things to note:


I proof these croissants in the refrigerator overnight then allow them to set, at room temperature, for an hour before baking. The long, cold proof gives the dough more flavor and allows the butter to chill completely before the final proof at room temperature.


The oven gets a spritz of water from a spray bottle before the croissants go in, and another when I put them in the oven.  The steam helps the croissants get nice and big.  You want that.


Give yourself two or three days to make these.  If I do not have a full day to make the dough and do the turns, about 6 hours for stage one and two,  I make the dough and make the butter block the first day, do the turns and make up the croissants the second and bake the third.


Cook the croissants until they are well past golden brown. The edges should be quite dark and the tops a robust brown color.  This does two things, it gives the croissants more flavor and it ensures they are done all the way through.


Once made up into croissants you can freeze the dough and store it for as long as two months.  Just put the frozen croissants in the refrigerator overnight to defrost and let stand for an hour and a half before baking.


This dough can also be used for some pretty awesome danish!


Butter Croissants


Roll your sleeves up, get out your butter and remember, no fear!  You CAN do this!!


Butter Croissants   Yield 5 pounds of dough (about 48 croissants)
Adapted from Professional Baking, 4th Edition by Wayne Glisslen


For the pre-ferment:
7 ounces water, warmed to 110F
1/2 ounce dry active yeast
5 ounces bread flour


For the dough:
2.5 ounces sugar
1 teaspoon salt
12 ounces whole milk
1 1/2 ounces water
2 pounds bread flour


For the butter block:
1 pound 4 ounces butter (I use salted for croissants, but unsalted is also good)


Egg wash:
1 egg
1 tablespoon cream
2 teaspoons water


 


Butter Croissants Butter Croissants


Begin by preparing the pre-ferment.  In the bowl of a mixer, or in a large bowl, mix the water, yeast, and bread flour.  Mix until it forms a very wet dough.  Cover and let stand for 15 minutes.


While the pre-ferment sits prepare the butter block.


Butter Croissants Butter Croissants


Between two sheets of parchment paper arrange 5 sticks of cold butter into a rough square.  Using a rolling pin press and pound the butter until it forms a rectangle about 1/4″ thick.  Place this in the refrigerator until ready to use.


Butter Croissants Butter Croissants


Once the pre-ferment is rested add the ingredients for the dough and mix on low speed for three minutes.  Increase the speed to medium for two minutes.  You do not want to form gluten, you are just trying to form a rough ball of dough.  Turn the dough out on a lightly floured surface and knead lightly until it forms a relatively smooth ball.


Butter Croissants Butter CroissantsButter Croissants


Place the dough in an oiled bowl and cover until it is double in bulk, about 50 minutes.  Turn the dough out of the bowl onto a lightly floured surface and, using the palm of your hand, press out the air bubbles.  Form another ball and return to the bowl.  Refrigerate for an hour.


Butter Croissants Butter Croissants


Once the dough has rested for an hour remove it and the butter block from the refrigerator.  Turn the dough out on a a lightly floured surface and press out the air.  Using a rolling pin form a large rectangle roughly  12″ x 24″.


Butter Croissants


Take the butter block still wrapped in parchment and see if it covers 2/3 of the rolled out dough.  If it is too small roll it out until it fits, leaving a 1/2″ border around the edges.  You can use your fingers to spread the butter if needed, just make sure that the butter does not develop any holes.


Butter Croissants Butter Croissants


Fold the dough with out butter over the center of the dough.  Fold the buttered side in.   At this point check to see of the butter is getting soft.  You want the butter cool and firm, but if it is starting to melt let the dough chill, covered, for twenty minutes before you make the first turn. ( If you work quickly you can incorporate the butter and do your first turn before you have to chill.  Your first time you may not be able to.  That is completely ok.)


Butter CroissantsButter Croissants Butter Croissants Butter Croissants


Turn the dough 90 degrees, or with the long seam facing horizontal to you.  Dust the board and the dough well with flour and roll out the dough into a rectangle that is about 12″ by 20″.  Dust all the flour from the dough and fold one third of the dough in.  Dust the top of the dough again to remove any flour and then fold the other third over the top.  Wrap the dough in plastic and chill in the refrigerator for an hour.


Repeat this process two more times.


Once you have completed three turns, and the dough has rested for an hour, you are ready to roll out and make up your croissants.


Divide the dough in half.  Wrap the half you are not using and return to the refrigerator.


Butter Croissants Butter Croissants


On a well floured surface roll out the dough until it is about 1/8″ thick.  You may need to let the dough rest during this process if it starts to spring back.  If so, cover with plastic and return to the refrigerator for ten minutes.  Once rolled out cut the dough in half lengthwise with a pizza cutter.  Now, holding your cutter at an angle cut triangles from the strips of dough that are about 4″ wide at the base.  Cut one strip at a time.


Butter Croissants Butter Croissants Butter Croissants


Working with a few triangles at a time, chilling the rest, stretch the dough gently at the base until it is about 5″ to 6″ wide, then stretch the dough lengthwise so it forms a long triangle.  Working from the base, roll the dough onto itself, stopping to stretch the unrolled dough half way through.  Place the dough with the point on the bottom and tuck the edges in to form a crescent shape.  Place on a parchment lined sheet pan.


Cover with plastic and chill for at least 4 hours, but overnight is best.


Heat the oven to 400 F, prepare the egg wash, and fill a spray bottle with water.  Set the dough out to proof for an hour at room temperature while the oven heats.


When you are ready to bake spritz the inside of the oven with water.  Close the door and wait thirty seconds.  Brush the croissants with egg wash, then put the pan in the oven and spritz again and quickly close the door.


Butter Croissants


Bake for 18 to 22 minutes for medium sized croissants, or until the tops are very brown and they sound hollow when tapped on the side.  Rest on the pan for five minutes before removing to a wire rack to cool slightly.


Butter Croissants


Serve warm.


Butter Croissants


 

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