The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

croissant

  • Pin It
DiJonCamacho's picture
DiJonCamacho

I see I'm not the only one who was on a quest for the perfect croissant...I'm on the quest for the perfect pain au chocolat i just want the dough to be right. I want my croissant and pain au chocolat to taste like the one from Galaxy Desserts/Williams-Sonoma. I came relatively close and this is the results I have thus far. These tasted great but I have no idea where to get fresh yeast from so I used active dry rapid yeast and I think the fresh yeast is what I'm mixing for them to be absolutely perfect. I love the way the layers looks. I was truly amazed when I popped these out of the oven.

mwilson's picture
mwilson

I confess, I am in no way skilled at lamination and hardly ever make croissants. It’s something I’ve done only a handful of times. These were my best yet and not only that, these are solely leavened by natural means, a first.

Original recipe found here - I scaled it down and used a lower ratio of butter for folding in.

2550111000flour 00 W 210/230   
50100222000flour 00 W 360/380 
2550221000sourdough 
20409800caster sugar 
2550221000egg yolks 
2550221000water 
19388750butter 
 
50100222000flour 00 W 210/230 
100200444000flour 00 W 360/380 
2855121100caster sugar 
75150333000egg yolks 
361120salt 
8153300acacia honey 
2550111000water 
2550111000milk 
13256500butter 
--------*butter for folding in
516g1029g%20570g 

*original recipe says to use 2.5Kg of butter per every 4.5Kg of dough. I used 1/3 butter to dough.

Unfortunately they got too warm (31.5C) whilst proving, consequently some of the butter started to melt out and there was a slight unwated acidity in the finished product. They also rose a lot making things rather cramped!

After the bake

Crumb with errors

Incredibly delicate like clouds that just flaked and melted away in the mouth!

jooney's picture

croissant help!

November 20, 2012 - 1:57am -- jooney

Hi,

I'm a very beginner with baking and have been trying to make croissants for three weeks or so. 

The biggest problem I'm having with my croissant dough is that it is difficult to roll out, especially when all my turns are completed and it is ready to be cut and shaped.   It just keeps springing back!  And every time that happens, I tend to press on it even harder, which eventually lead to butter leakage everywhere.  

What do I need to do prevent this from happening?

Let me give you some info on my recipe.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We were inspired, even though the wrong time of year for laminated doughs with it being 8o F inside and 105 F outside in AZ, by txfarmer's croissants and Danish pastries. 

Hers are just fantastic to look at and professional in every way - unlike mine.  But, I thought we would give it a go now and get back to them later next winter.  Her posts can be seen here:  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/22677/poolish-croissant-pursuit-perfection and here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/26777/cheese-danish-sourdough-all-american-beauty

We needed to change her recipe from yeast to sourdough and yeast water since I no longer stock any commercial yeast.   I didn't expect my first attempt at laminated dough to be anywhere near txfarmer's and I was right.  Freezing some of the croissants and Danish didn't help any either I suppose :-)  But I did learn many important things about lamination which will help my assistant out later. 

A very nice grilled; Amish Swiss and pepperjack cheese with grilled chicken sandwich made for lunch with this fine white sandwich bread.  Love the chia seeds.   The sweet potato and the pickled tomato, red onion and cucumber salad were also nice.

We made this enriched dough (can't believe it didn't have cream in it too) into 3 variations with various flavors; a non -laminated white sandwich bread (half of the dough split off before lamination), 3 kinds of Danish (blueberry, strawberry and dried apricot) and 2 kinds of croissants (plain and with a sweet home made mince meat filling made with beef shanks - those are the fat ones that didn't have 7 steps).

Used 27.5% of the total dough weight in roll-in butter (180 grams),  txfarmer recommends 30% but we had a few more add ins than her recipe that upped the total weight.  Txfarmer also said to hold the hydration down al little and I managed to somehow up it slightly,at least a couple of percent, if I calculated properly.  We used dried apricots and they burned on the top and I should have reconstituted them in bourbon or water.  We wanted to take them out of the oven at 25 minutes but by mistake took them out at 22 minutes and they could have used another 3 minutes in the oven.  If you live in AZ it is best to do this in the wintertime. 

 

My wife summed it up best.  They don't look too good but they taste OK.  I give the sandwich loaf a solid B and the rest a C only because it was a first attempt - my apprentice is worried she will soon be replaced since she said she was a lamination freak - well, at least the freak part was right:-) 

The formula and method follows the pictures.

Method

 Build the levain over 3 - 4 hour steps.  I mixed the YW and the SD together from the beginning as is our usual now a days.  Mine had more than doubled over 12 hours and then I refrigerated it overnight.

The nest morning, mix everything except the levain and the salt together in the mixing bowl and autolyse for 1 hour.  Add the levain and the salt and mix on KA 2 for 4 minutes and KA 3 for 1 minute.  Remove to an oiled bowl and rest for 15 minutes.  Do (4) S &F’s every 15 minutes.  At the 1 hour mark let the dough develop and ferment for 1 hour.

At this point I split off half the dough and formed it into a boule and let it ferment for another hour.  Then it was formed into a loaf, placed into a Pyrex loaf pan and refrigerated for 4 hours.  It doubled in the fridge.  It was then removed and allowed to final proof for 3 hours.  When it tripled in volume from when it initially went into the loaf pan, we slashed it and put it into a425 Fmini oven with steam for 10 minutes.  The steam was removed and the temperature turned down to 375 F convection this time.  The loaf was turned 180 degrees every 4 minutes 2 times.    At this point the loaf was removed from the Pyrex and allowed to finish baking turning 2 more times at 5 minute each.  When the loaf reached 205 F the loaf was allowed to stay in the off oven with the door ajar for 10 more minutes to crisp the crust..  It was then removed to a cooling rack.

 The other half of the dough was used for lamination and I followed txfarmer’s method and procedure.  I used180 gramsof roll-in butter for 645 g of dough (27.5%).  The croissants and Danish were retarded overnight in a plastic bag in the fridge where the back half of them froze – no harm done though.  In the morning, they came out of the fridge for final proof – this took about 2 ½ hours.  Then they were placed in the 425 F oven for 22 minutes (should have been 25 minutes) rotated half way through and the temperature turned down to 375 F convection.  When done they went onto a cooking rack from the parchment covered baking sheet.

Formula

YW and SD Laminated Croissant Dough     
      
Mixed Starter    Build 1    Build 2    Build 3    Total     %
SD Starter2500253.80%
Yeast Water3020207016.28%
AP555011021531.40%
Water25305010524.42%
Total Starter13510018041596.51%
      
Starter     
Hydration82.42%    
Levain % of Total32.40%    
      
Dough Flour        %   
AP42598.84%   
Dough Flour430100.00%   
Salt92.09%   
Milk20647.91%   
Dough Hydration47.91%0.00%   
      
      
Total Flour657.5    
Total Water/Milk393.5    
T. Dough Hydrat.59.85%    
      
Hydration w/ Adds71.76%    
Total Weight1,281    
      
Add - Ins       %   
VW Gluten51.16%   
Sugar409.30%   
Butter5011.63%   
Egg9020.93%   
White Rye Malt51.16%   
Barley Malt163.72%   
Chia Seeds153.49%   
Total22151.40%   
yy's picture
yy

Thanks to Weekend Bakery's extremely helpful Croissant Making Log, I finally made a batch of croissants that I'm happy with (see link for formula and tips). I made a couple of changes to the Hamelman formula used in the Weekend Bakery log: I used 4 grams of SAF gold osmotolerant yeast instead of 11 g of regular instant yeast (11 g is a huge amount of yeast, which I don't think is necessary if you use a yeast that can stand up to the sugar content in the dough), and I added a teaspoon of barley malt syrup for flavor.  Last time I made croissants was about a year ago, and the attempt was not so successful. I feel like I learned a lot from comparing that bake to this one:

1. Last time: the dough was mixed for too long and got too developed. This made it impossible to roll out the layers. It was like wrestling with a rubber band. Not only did this make the process hard on the arms, it also resulted in thicker, doughier layers because the dough could not relax enough to be rolled out thinly. 

This time: I mixed the dough until uniform and gluten formation had barely begun. As Ciril Hitz says in Baking Artisan Bread, gluten development should happen in the course of being rolled out (stretched) during the lamination steps. There is no need to fully develop the gluten in the beginning. 

2. Last time: The butter layer shattered into several small pieces instead of spreading out uniformly, due to being too cold. A number of authors advise you to freeze the dough between lamination steps for about 20-30 minutes, arguing that this will make the butter and dough the right consistency to roll out. 

This time: I just used the fridge instead of the freezer. I used Kerrygold butter, which has fat content equivalent to typical European butters, so at 38 degrees, it is stiff yet pliable. I guess this depends on how cold your freezer is. Mine is kept at a frosty -2 Fahrenheit. 

3. Last time: Croissants were underproofed, so the butter leaked out very badly during baking.

This time: I proofed until the croissants were "jiggly" and very puffy. While there was still a tiny bit of butter meltage, it was not nearly as bad as last time.  

Here were the results from today:

The crust was so light and the crumb was so tender that they started shattering under the slight pressure of my fingers while being transferred to the cooling rack. The croissants are shatteringly crisp on the outside and moist and light on the inside. The crumb shreds into transparent sheets. I highly recommend the Weekend Bakery tutorial.

I've frozen half the batch, so it'll be interesting to see whether this affects the taste and texture. Happy Sunday, everyone!

T

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

This "Swiss" traditions are very diffcult to forget, even after 14 years in the U.S.

 

 

And I guess why should we!

 

Happy Baking

Thomas

shelstaj's picture
shelstaj

Hello fellow bakers! 

Ive been a fan on The Fresh Loaf for quite some time, and finally have decided to start posting some stuff!

I have been working in restaurants the last 2 1/2 years, the last year in pastry/bakeries. I currently work at a small startup bakery in San Francisco.  we are working on croissants at the moment, ive been practicing given that they are one of my favorite things to eat! I am relatively new to yeasted doughs, so here are some of the test runs so far!  

Ive started with the Pierre Herme base recipe and have been playing around with it.

the recipe calls for fresh yeast and ive been currently playing with fresh yeast vs osmotolerant yeast. The recipe also calls for the dough to be mixed, then left to rest for 24 hours in the fridge. I am currently trying to do bulk fermentation in hopes to avoid the 24 hours in the fridge enabling me to produce the croissants from mix to shape within a 8-10 hour shift.

here are the results between 2 of my recent batches. 

My current issues are that im looking for more of a crack and flake  as well as a bit more volume. ill be sure and snap some more pictures, i just mixed 2 batches earlier today which i am going to laminate and shape tonight! results to be posted soon! 

heres a picture of fresh yeast. the dough was mixed just to combine, then left to rest for 24 hours in the fridge before starting lamination.

 

here are pics from a batch which i used osmotolerant yeast , did a bulk fermentation for 1 hour, till the dough was about double in size, then punched it down, let chill in fridge then started lamination. 

 

 

shelstaj's picture
shelstaj

Hello fellow bakers! 

Ive been a fan on The Fresh Loaf for quite some time, and finally have decided to start posting some stuff!

I have been working in restaurants the last 2 1/2 years, the last year in pastry/bakeries. I currently work at a small startup bakery in San Francisco. Currently one of the things we are working on is croissants. 

Ive started with the Pierre Herme base recipe and have been playing around with it.

the recipe calls for fresh yeast and ive been currently playing with fresh yeast vs osmotolerant yeast. The recipe also calls for the dough to be mixed, then left to rest for 24 hours in the fridge. I am currently trying to do bulk fermentation in hopes to avoid the 24 hours in the fridge enabling me to produce the croissants from mix to shape within a 8-10 hour shift.

here are the results between 2 of my recent batches. 

<table style="width:auto;"><tr><td><a href="http://www.thefreshloaf.com/https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/LoNX3vdFS3B2RK2B_mb9i_QPzKwtmnNXUyHCYq75zMc?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="http://www.thefreshloaf.com/https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-hQ832IsknS0/TyXq2Y-Q97I/AAAAAAAABbg/AEGwrm9iBpw/s144/DSC00735.JPG" height="144" width="96" /></a></td></tr><tr><td style="font-family:arial,sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:right">From <a href="http://www.thefreshloaf.com/https://picasaweb.google.com/Jshelsta/Crx?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCPLL15yC7vasHg&feat=embedwebsite">crx</a></td></tr></table>

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Today was my first attempt at croissant making.  I was looking for something that was flaky, but could be used as a sandwich.  While mine turned out kind of small, I'm very pleased with my first try. 

I found this recipe on TFL, then changed it up.  This is what I did:

Mix 1/2 cup of starter, 1 3/4 c all purpose flour, 2 T oil (I used olive oil), 1/2 c warm milk together.  Add 1 1/2 t noniodized salt.  Knead LIGHTLY, for only a few minutes.  Place in oiled bowl with plastic wrap, and put in fridge over night.

Next day: 

--Beat out butter in sheets.  I beat out enough butter to cover the surface of the dough when rolled out.  Chill butter.  Roll out dough as flat as possible, chill

--Take dough sheet in squarish shape, place the butter sheet on the dough in a diamond (points hitting the middle of the dough's sides).  Wrap the dough around the butter like an envelope, making a smaller square.

--Roll out into long rectangle, using water for the rolling pin and hands to assist.  Fold the dough over into thirds--you should have three layers on top of each other.  Roll out.  Repeat folding and rolling again, then put in fridge.

--Repeat the folding and rolling twice, then put in fridge.

--Roll out dough again.  Cut into long triangles, making a wide bottom and a point at the top in the middle of the other two (help me here...what kind of triangle is this).  Roll up the triangle with the flat, two-pointed side first, ending with the top middle point.  Use light flour to help.

--Let them proof.

--Bake 10-15 minutes in preheated 475 degrees Fahrenheit oven.

crumb view (sorry, poor camera)

 

constructive comments welcome

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - croissant