The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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loydb's picture
loydb

This is my take on Bon Appétit's Thyme Gougères. I subbed chives for the thyme, and used finely milled hard white wheat for the flour. I also hedged my bets with 1/4 teaspoon of baking powder. These are cheesily delicious, and are begging to be filled with something (duck liver patè maybe?)


loydb's picture
loydb

This is the BBA basic sourdough to which was added 2 diced granny smith apples, 4 oz of toasted walnuts and 3 oz of small-dice parmesan and asiago cheese. The starter was KA New England that had been fed 50/50 with KA bread flour and home-ground hard red wheat. The final flour addition was 15% WW, 5% Rye and 80% KA. It got a stretch-and-fold at 15, 45, 90 and 120 minutes, then proofed for another 3 hours. The final shaped loaves proofed a little over two hours before being glazed with egg yolk and baked. Baking time was a total of 45 minutes to get the internal temp up -- I'm sure there was a lot of moisture from the apples. It's yummy. Yes, it really is slightly purple (from the walnuts I believe).

 

chrisg's picture
chrisg

My son wants pizza.  I can't say no to him. He is so flippin' cute. He also thinks my pizza is better than anything from a pizza place. So, I can't say no. Plus it gives me a good reason to make some dough.  This recipe comes from the America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook.  The recipe is at the end, if you want to try it. I spent lots of time testing recipe after recipe and found that this one makes a nice, stretchy dough.  I tweeked it a bit.


 


Ready to Rise


I tried something new with this batch of dough. I let the machine go for 5 minutes, then let it rest for 5, then turned the machine on for 5 more minutes. I have to say it came out nice and silky.


First Rise


After about 45 minutes on the counter, I shoved it in the fridge for about 1 more hour.  I did this because I had to run an errand.  Pizza dough is forgiving, so no worries.  The most amazing thing happened, the dough became super elastic.  I stretched one so thin, I think it only had one side. THIN CRUST HERE I COME!


Balls


They are like pretty little maids in a row.  I let them rest on the counter to warm up.  Cold dough is hard to stretch.   My wife likes her pizza thick, I am kind of a purest when it comes to pizza. I prefer napolitian style pizza, so I have a happy medium that even the kids love.


Rolled out


I found that if I don't run the docking wheel over it I get ginormous bubbles and everything slides off.  That looks cool, but my stone and oven become a big ol' mess.  Topped


I just top it with a quick and simple pizza sauce and some mozzerella/provolone mix  - Into the oven with you!


This goes in...


Ready to Cook


 


 


 


 


This comes out!


DONE!


I love pizza!


 


Basic Pizza Dough (from America's Test Kitchen)


4  1/2 c. bread flour


1 envelope yeast


1  1/2 t. salt


2 T. olive oil - (the better the oil, the better the flavor of the crust.)


1  3/4 c. warm water (I use bottled water. I don't know if that makes any difference, Ask a New Yorker.)


It's all dump and go from here. Try out the 5-5-5 method for yourself (it's in the blog.) don't forget to stick it in the fridge for at least an hour.  I plan on trying it over night to see what happens.  I will update if it is good.


 

Terrell's picture
Terrell

I've been making a lot of bread lately. Had some extra that I either needed to throw away or make something out of. They won't let you feed it to the ducks in Portland, you know. So, I used my remarkable internet research skills to look for recipes using leftover bread. Apparently, many people just make bread crumbs and put them in the freezer. I was looking for something a little more exciting. The New York Times happened to have a recipe for panade published last week in an article about young yuppy farmers (you may have to register to see the article.) It was interesting but it uses a lot of cauliflower, not one of my favorite foods, so I kept looking. Epicurious had a strata recipe with spinach that got a ton of comments but it was one of those recipes that you have to make eight hours ahead. I rarely know what I want for dinner until I get right up to it so I hardly ever plan that far ahead unless I'm cooking for company. The strata sounded good though so I checked around for something similar and came across this recipe from Martha Rose Schulman, also in the New York Times. Her recipe just mixes all the ingredients and pops it right in the oven. It sounded perfect, so I stopped at the grocery store on my way home and picked up the cavolo nero or black leaf kale that I was sure was in the recipe. I checked the dried mushrooms she calls for, was appalled at the price and decided to substitute fresh criminis instead. Last night, ready to cook, I pulled up the recipe again. Hmmm, her recipe is for cheese strata with chard. Why was I so sure it was black kale? Ahh, the kale was in the panade. OK, another substitution. Of course I was also using my leftover whole grain bread for her french baguette and some random bits of cheese I wanted to clear out of the fridge instead of the Gruyère she listed. I guess we'll see how it comes out. An hour or so later and I was pretty pleased with myself. I had accomplished my goal of using up some of that bread and made myself a pretty tasty dinner. Here's the recipe...


Strata with Cavolo Nero and Mushrooms (seriously adapted from Martha Rose Shulman)

  • 4 or 5 thick slices of whole grain bread (I used about 4 cups of my Pilgrim's Bread)

  • 1 tablespoon butter

  • 1/2 pound of crimini mushrooms, coarsely chopped

  • half bunch (about 8 ounces I think) of cavolo nero/dark leaf kale, stemmed and cleaned

  • 3 garlic cloves, 1 cut in half, the other two minced

  • 2 cups of milk (I used 2%)

  • 3/4 cup of grated cheese, tightly packed (I used what I had in the fridge, about half goat cheddar and half kasseri)

  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

  • 1 teaspoon dried rosemary

  • salt and pepper to taste

  • 4 large eggs

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • freshly ground pepper


Cavolo Nero   Crimini


Preheat the oven to 350. Oil or butter a two quart baking dish or gratin pan. If the bread is soft, as mine was, toast it lightly and then rub each slice front and back with the halved garlic clove. If your bread is really stale, you can skip the toasting. Cut into 1 inch dice. Place in a large bowl and toss with 2/3 cup of the milk. Set aside.


 Mix


In a large skillet, saute the mushrooms in the butter for 2 to 3 minutes, just until they smell good. Remove from skillet and set aside. Add the still wet kale to the skillet and cook over medium high heat until it starts to wilt. Cover the pan and let the kale steam until it has collapsed, about 5 minutes. Add more water if needed but just enough to steam not boil it. Uncover and stir. When all the kale has wilted, remove from the pan and rinse in cold water. Squeeze to get out the remaining moisture and then chop and set aside. Add 1 tablespoon of the olive oil to the skillet and quickly saute the minced garlic over medium heat. Stir in the mushrooms, rosemary and kale. Stir together and season with salt and pepper. Remember that the cheese and bread both have salt in them so adjust your seasonings with that in mind (my dish turned out slightly too salty because of this, I think). Remove from the heat and add the kale mixture to the bread cubes. Add the grated cheeses (not the Parmesan, that comes later), toss to mix and then arrange in the prepared baking dish.


Saute


Beat the eggs in a medium bowl. Add the remaining milk, the 1/2 teaspoon of salt and some freshly ground pepper. Pour over the bread mixture. Press the bread down into the eggs. Sprinkle the Parmesan on the top and drizzle the other tablespoon of oil on top of that. (The oil thing is in Martha's recipe. I have to admit that I couldn't tell there was oil there and will probably not waste the effort next time I make the dish.) Place in the oven and bake 40 to 50 minutes until puffed and browned. Serves 4 to 6.


Cheese Strata with Kale and Mushrooms


Martha says you can do all the hard work ahead, up to the egg step, and it will keep, covered, in your fridge up to a couple of days. Add the egg and milk when you're ready to bake. Next time I make this I will probably halve the recipe and bake it in a small dish. It's way too much for one person to dispose of. I'll likely let the bread sit out to get a little more stale before toasting. And as I said, I will cut the salt a little bit. The crimini were fabulous, great flavor. It was, however, the rosemary that really made it.


Dinner time

fatherjay's picture

Adding cheese to bread

June 3, 2010 - 9:36pm -- fatherjay
Forums: 

A friend asked me last week to make a rosemary-asiago bread.  It sounds terrific, so I asked for her recipe.  She doesn't have one!  But I'm going to do it anyway.


I'm just wondering if anybody has any pointers on adding cheese to an existing bread recipe.  How will the added mlik fat affect the proportions?  Should I adjust the other liquid? If part of it is milk, is that a good idea? a bad idea?  If my basic recipe includes some other fat (oil, butter...) should I reduce it? leave it out?

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

Took a cheese making class this week. Learned to make fresh mozarella, ricotta, creme fraise, mascarpone and queso blanco. I couldn't believe the difference between fresh made cheese and store bought. I know I will be using these recipes a lot in the future. I can hardly wait to make my blueberry braid bread with mascarpone cheese, using the fresh version. I might make it with ricotta this time too. One of each, just to compare.


The cheeses were so easy. The only one that was the least bit fussy at all was mozarella and that is only because you have to stretch it. That was so easy after making bread. The others were stir, strain and go.


I also bought a nutrimill today. Now I'm looking for grain bins for the 50lbs of hard red spring wheat and 25lbs of rye that I picked up at the baking store this morning. Man, can hardly wait to get back into the house and have a real kitchen!!! I was looking at all those bags of kamut, spelt, soft wheat, durum, etc. I'm going to be dangerous when I have a full sized house!

LeadDog's picture

Jalapeno, Bacon, and Cheese

September 20, 2009 - 8:59pm -- LeadDog

We used to buy a sourdough bread that had Jalapeno and Cheese in it that we really liked. When I saw in bread books formulas for Bacon and Cheese I thought why not Jalaneno, Bacon , and Cheese? I was right on track with that question as the bread really does taste great. Here is a picture of the finished bread.

And a picture of the crumb.

rick.c's picture

Can I just make a recipe up?

September 10, 2009 - 8:45pm -- rick.c

OK I am pretty sure I can...  I do have a couple questions, (at the end)


So, I have been eyeballing the BBA Potato cheddar & chive recipe, as well as some sourdough recipes and beer & cherddar recipes from this site.  So, I am trying to combine all 3.  I got a Saranac Brown Ale, nice dark & hoppy flavor and mixed it with enough flour and inactive starter, now called "hoochie momma" to get the sourdough cultures going.  I keep Hoochie starved until I want to use her, she works harder for the food that way.  OH YEAH!!! but that's another story.

gaaarp's picture

Blessed Are the Cheesemakers

December 13, 2008 - 7:40pm -- gaaarp
Forums: 

I hold Barbara Kingsolver responsible for the fact that I now own Ricki's Cheesemaking Kit.  In her book Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, Kingsolver somehow made cheesemaking sound like as much fun as making bread.  And maybe some people find it to be so.  To quote Hannibal Lechter, "I, on the other hand, do not."  The cheese it made was fine.  It just seemed like too much work to me.

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