The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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hsmum's picture

altoids survival bread

September 23, 2009 - 8:52pm -- hsmum
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Well no, it actually doesn't contain Altoids.  Just the tin.  And probably your survival would have to be in jeopardy before you'd actually resort to this.  But!  Kudos to the baker (?) for his resourcefulness.  :)


Here's the link:


http://www.instructables.com/id/Altoids-Tin-Bread-Bake-Survival-Bread/


Actually, maybe I'm being unfair.  I suppose this might be a great technique for backpackers.


Karen


 

Glass-Weaver's picture

Suggestions Please: Bread for 5-day Rafting Trip

August 11, 2009 - 12:40pm -- Glass-Weaver

I'm going on a 5-day river trip with a group of 14 people.  There will be two transportation days prior to getting on the river.  So...I need a bread that will stand up to 7-8 days of storage in hot conditions, and that can handle the rough treatment of being bounced around in a dry bag (a dry bag is like a back-pack that will not allow water inside.)  We plan to make sandwiches, but the bread doesn't have to be sliced loaves.

Aprea's picture

Looking for a great suggestion for camping trip

April 5, 2009 - 11:22am -- Aprea
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Hi Everybody - I am sending my brother, his wife and 2 teenage boys, my husband and 2 older children off canoeing the next couple of days.  I am hoping somebody can inspire me with a nice sourdough loaf to send them off with - something like the columbian sourdough, which is loaded with whole grains.  I have never tried this recipe - i am very good at the BBA sourdough with 10% whole wheat - but I was looking for something that will hold up well, and stick to their ribs.


 

Erzsebet Gilbert's picture

"I pita the fool," or, a report on camp baking and a gyro filling recipe

March 22, 2009 - 10:03am -- Erzsebet Gilbert
Forums: 

Hello, everybody!  


I'll begin with another thank-you to all those who responded to my previous/first post, my questions about baking while camping.  Using all the help, I'm planning upon trying bread-steamed-in-a-can, or crumpets, or English muffins quite soon.  Last night, however, I had success.(!)...

Charleen2027's picture

Simple sourdough procedure for camping?

July 28, 2007 - 1:59pm -- Charleen2027

I've been making bread while camping for quite a while -- flour, water, salt, commercial yeast, proof, rise a couple times, shape and bake. It's dependable and fun. But I want to expand the flavor - and challenge - and start making sourdough bread. Commercial bakers, and ambitious home bakers have evolves pretty complex multistage processes which require careful temperature control pretty much all along the way, so the limited tools and lack of temperature control while camping present extra challenges.

xabanga's picture
xabanga

Hello,

This is my first posting (although not my first bread). I've been researching an easy campfire bread recipe, and I ended up with a recipe for Australian Damper bread (actually there were several). I tried baking the bread at home, but because it used chemical leveners, I thought it tasted more like a biscuit rather than a bread (it was still good however). I did a little more research and found a recipe for a damper made with yeast (which is not the traditional way to make it). I had planned on baking it the traditional way in campfire ashes this weekend but I ended up baking it in my oven using baking tiles. So here's the recipe:

Australian Damper with Yeast

2 1/4 tsp yeast

2 Tbsp sugar

3 cups bread flour

1 Tbsp baking powder

3/4 tsp salt

1 1/4 cup warm water

1/4 cup melted butter

Mix the dry ingredient in a bowl. Add the melted butter and mix it in the flour mixture. Slowly add the water, knead lightly (about 1 minute), adding more flour as necessary. Let the dough rest in a bowl for 10 minutes. On a lightly floured surface, knead and shape the dough into a boule. Place it in a floured linen-lined proofing bowl and let it rise for 30 minutes.


Meanwhile preheat the oven to 375 degrees F with a baking stone on the middle rack and an old pan on the bottom rack. When the dough is risen, transfer it to parchement paper on an upside down cookie sheet (it helps slidding the dough onto the baking stone). Slash the dough.

Add ~1 cup boiling water to the old pan in the oven and let it steam for 1 minute before slidding the dough onto the baking stone. Bake for 35 minutes then cool on a baking rack. Enjoy!

Next time I'll try the bread on a campfire.

slothbear's picture

Coleman Instastart propane camping oven

April 10, 2007 - 7:42pm -- slothbear

I was wondering if anyone has experience with this oven. At home, I bake two to three times per week. Right now, I'm traveling across America in an RV that doesn't have an oven. I'm really starting to miss baking my own bread.

I think Coleman came out with this oven last year and I haven't been able to find a lot of reviews -- and none that cover baking bread. This is certainly the opposite of a super-precise commercial oven with steam control -- but I'm willing to accept some imperfect bread instead of store-bought bread.

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