The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Green Tea's picture
Green Tea

After some successfully delicious baking sessions...


Spinach Cheese Boule - made wonderful sandwich bread



Pain de Provence - absolutely amazing!!!  SO good as toast! (but, yes, I really need to work on my scoring, not just my usual complete degassing of a bread as I attempt to slice...)



...I finally decided it was about time (as I started bread baking last November or so?) to try to develop my own recipe.


And I chose the obvious.


With the reference of numerous other bread recipes, I ended up with my Sweet Green Tea Bread.


(The glaze was stolen and slightly altered from Beth Henspengers Sweet Vanilla Challah (so good!!) in her book Bread for All Seasons)


Anyhow, here was how it was supposed to go:



Sweet Green Tea Bread


Preferment
1 tbsp active dry yeast
3/4 cup warm water or milk
1 cup all purpose flour


Dough
2 ½ cups all purpose flour
1/3 cup sugar
1 tsp salt
6 tbsp green tea leaves
1 cup strongly brewed green tea (with or without the tea leaves)
1 well beaten egg
3 tbsp very soft butter


Glaze
1 egg yolk
¼ tsp vanilla extract
½ tsp sugar


Sesame seeds (optional)


Preferment: Mix the yeast, warm milk or water and flour together, set aside ½ hour minutes.


Glaze: blend ingredients, set aside.


Dough: In a large bowl blend the flour, sugar and salt. Grind half of the green tea into powder. Blend the (dry) green tea into the (liquid) green tea, add egg and let it sit for a few moments until the (dry) green tea is soft.



Add the green tea mixture into the dry ingredients and then beat in the butter, lastly mix in sponge.  Knead with generously floured surface and hands until smooth and satiny (or until whenever you think it is ready- it was more of a guess on my amateur behalf).


First rise- until double in bulk.
Second rise- mostly degas, shape into one large loaf or two small ones and let the dough rise until double in bulk again.


Bake- Glaze and sprinkle with sesame seeds before putting in the oven preheated to 350ºF (with a preheated pan in bottom). Pour water in the pan and spray the oven walls and bake for around 30-50 minutes.



Looks just like one big cha sui bao! (Chinese barbaque pork bun)



And... here was how it really went.  I forgot to put in the butter and went very much off schedule for near the ending moments of the final rise I ended up having to leave the poor bread on its own for around three hours... although I did pop it in the cellar to try to slow rising!


Despite that it turned out wonderfully and the smell that filled the house was heavenly!


Now if I were to make it again... I think I would cut the ground green tea down to only 2 tablespoons, I have to admit there might have been just a bit too much. 


Please, if you have an advice for improving my recipe please, please reply!  It is probably in dire need of improvement!

Mitch550's picture

Errors in Hammelman and DiMuzio Bread Books

July 31, 2009 - 10:39am -- Mitch550
Forums: 

Hello to all,


I've read book reviews here, on Amazon, and other places about apparent errors that were noted by readers in Jeffrey Hammelman's and Daniel DiMuzio's otherwise wonderfully rated books. Both of these books are published by Wiley, and I was surprised and bothered that Wiley hadn't posted Errata pages for either of these books.  Dan's book only came out this past February so one can possibly excuse the fact that there isn't an Errata page for that one, but Jeffrey Hammelman's book was published in 2004, so it's hard to find an excuse for that.

mneidich's picture
mneidich

This is my first post, so before I get into the details, here's a little bit about me. I live in the Pacific Northwest, and I took up breadbaking a few years ago when I moved here from the Southeast. The first breads I made were Challahs, and I got pretty good at making them. I'd make pizza, too, but that doesn't really count. After a while, I decided to start my own sourdough starter earlier this year, and after baking every week (except during Passover when I wasn't supposed to), I was starting to get a little annoyed that my breads wouldn't turn out how I wanted them.


Yesterday afternoon, i decided to do some calculations and create a bread that is about 65% hydration. I also knew that I needed to adjust my flour. I like using Bob's Red Mill because it's local, but it only has about an 11.7% gluten content. I adjusted my flour by adding vital wheat gluten to the the flour I used.


So, here are the results: The holes are just right, the crumb is nice and open, and the crust is nice and crusty (duh - it's a crust, right?!). Here are some pictures, and below the pictures are the instructions.






Evening before bake:


Ingredients:



  • 300g Bread flour (13% gluten content)

  • 225 grams lukewarm water

  • 50g highly active firm starter



  1. In a medium-sized ceramic bowl, mix the starter into the water, then add the flour.

  2. Mix until even consistency is achieved (a couple minutes)

  3. Leave mixture in bowl and cover with plastice wrap.

  4. Let sit in kitchen for ~10 hours (overnight)


 


The Day of the Bake:


Ingredients:



  • 450g Bread flour (13% gluten content)

  • 262g water

  • Starter mixture from previous evening.

  • 20g kosher salt

  • 30g olive oil



  1. Mix flour and water in a large bowl.

  2. Separate 50g of starter mixture and store in a jar for a future bake. Add all of the rest of it to the flour and water mixture.

  3. Mix just a little bit, then add oil and salt. Mix again until fairly incorperated.

  4. Turn out onto a clean surface (no flour or oil)

  5. Knead for 10 minutes, until gluten is well-formed.

  6. Form the dough into a ball and roll it in a little flour (to prevent it from sticking to the bowl while fermenting).

  7. Put the dough in a large ceramic bowl and cover with a damp cloth.]

  8. After ~2 hours of fermentation, take the dough out and form it into loaves, The dough probably has not changed much in size at this point.

  9. Put semolina flour into two bannetons to prevent loaves from sticking.

  10. Place formed loaves in bannetons and let proof for 5 hours (until dough doesn't spring back when poked)

  11. While dough is proofing, put baking stone on the second-to-top shelf in oven and heat oven to 550 degrees. Put a metal cookie sheet on the bottom shelf in the oven for steam-creation.

  12. Just before baking, lower temperature to 425 degrees.

  13. Turn loaves out onto a peel, slash them, and put on bread stone.

  14. Pour ~1 cup boiling water into the cake pan to create steam.

  15. Bake for 45 minutes, turning loaves at the half-way mark.

  16. Cool loaves uncovered on wire racks.


Okay, so that's it. If you try the recipe out, let me know how it goes :-)


-Matt

IVXX's picture

How to Preserve BRead??

July 21, 2009 - 1:51am -- IVXX

Good Morning Everyone!!


 


 


I am new to the forums,but I need some help.I have been making breads and stuff from eversince I was a kid with my mom.Everybody in my family loves my rolls and breads I need to send some baked items overseas and am worried about it spoiling.


it takes anywhere between a week to 2 weeks to get by mail.Is there anything I can do to help keep  the bread soft or even the icing on my rolls? or just keep them from going bad ffor that amount of time?


 

MommaT's picture

recipe or name for greek daily bread with sesame on top

July 18, 2009 - 8:52am -- MommaT
Forums: 

Hi,


 


I had the very big pleasure of spending the last two weeks in a tiny village on the coast of greece, south and east of Kalamata.


The primary bread at the local grocery store, and every taberna we visited, was the same simple loaf. Oval or torpedo shaped, it had a moderate to fine crumb with white-bread taste (although quite yellow inside) and sesame seeds all over the top.  It did not taste overly milky or egg-y, but more like a loaf with quite basic ingredients.

cookingwithdenay's picture
cookingwithdenay


Have you ever developed an original recipe? Most people think it is some long drawn out process, but remember you are not Pillsbury test kitchen with thousands of dollars and test kitchen cooks to address ever question or issue.


When you find a recipe that is good, reliable and consistent...that's a keeper. If it is not, you have a couple of choices. Rework the recipe, refine it so it works, put it in the "to-do" pile for a later date or toss it. What you do depends on how much time you want to devote to recipe and only you can answer that question.


As you test, and retest, you will find a pattern to the process and it will fall into an everyday groove. I would suggest that you schedule time each month to test or at least review the recipes you are working on. Remember it's not just about recipes, this is a listing of products you can enter into contest, feature in a magazine or newspaper, include in a future cookbook or sell in your home-based bakery. When your bakery is up and running and a local journalist ask...may we have a recipe to attach to your story? What will you say, no they are all secret...


Always have a dozen or so recipes that are uniquely yours that you don't mind sharing...just in case.


You may also want to place a recipe in your marketing materials...not that people will prepare them necessarily, but to show you are open to sharing your knowledge and skill. You are a great baker and this is not the time to be shy!


Now with that said, you don't have to give out your best recipes, just things you don't mind sharing. Give it some thought.


There is an old saying, there is nothing new under the sun, and it is so true. It is easy to add a new twist to something, but food companies spend millions to create new products, it's a real challenge; but every once and a while an independent culinary innovator comes up with a unique and inspiring food, spice or taste. Take a look at what is missing out there on the grocery shelves... get creative. I would love to see an alternative to buttercream frosting, but I have not yet figured out what it should be, something sweet, creamy and not made with all that fat.


 

treelala's picture
treelala

http://www.redrivergorge.com/


I Was thinking about how to bring health to a community and I thought about scripture about breaking bread with others. I decided to reach out to Cincinnati my home town. I am going through the community centers and reaching out to the directors to be involved in a brick bread oven workshop. I believe this will be a great tool for healthier neighborhoods. I wan to share this workshop with the fresh loaf community hoping that you will npass this tool along to people you know who are go getters when it comes to lifting up urban life. Blessing to all!


Featured Site: Red River Gorgeous, Bread Oven Workshop
Weekend of July 24, 25 & 26 2009

Red River Gorgeous, Wilderness cabin retreat sponsoring a breadoven workshop hosted by Welsh timberframer, Don Weber. Interested parties please email cdourson(at)redrivergorge.com. The workshop will be held the weekend of July 24, 25 & 26, 2009. Stay tuned for details and get ready for two days of hands on experienceop and enjoyment.

Bixmeister's picture
Bixmeister

Besides bread making, one of my other hobbies/interests is homebrewing.  I have brewed for over 15 years now.  I am an all-grain brewer which means I brew with grains rather than extract.  I am also an AHA beer judge at certified level.  You need to pass a test for this.  I am a member of a very fine beer club, QUAFF which put San Diego on the map beerwise by winning the National Homebrew Club of The Year award 6 years consecutively and several California titles.  You may ask yourself why am I telling you this when this is a bread oriented forum.


The answer is because I promised to bake bread for the National Homebrew Conference being held in Oakland, CA this year.  I promised four Ciabattas.  What I baked was 4 Ciabattas plus a bonus bread, my first attempt at a 6 strand braided Italian bread:


 



4 CIABATTAS


 



MY FIRST 6 STRAND BRAIDED ITALIAN BREAD


 


Comments and Suggestions Welcome

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

I was inspired by David (dmsnyder) and his 5 hour baguettes. I needed a sandwich bread that was as lean as I could get it but was still very much soft crusted and soft of crumb. I've found it, I think, by slightly modifying the 5 hour baguette idea and adding one enrichment: olive oil.



Stephanie’s Simple Bread
Makes 1 small loaf


225g AP or bread flour
10g rye flour
15g white whole wheat flour
3/4 teaspoon instant yeast
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
170g water


Mix ingredients in the bowl for your stand mixer until you form a shaggy mass. Mix, on low, for 5 minutes, then increase speed to medium for 3 or 4 more. I left this in a clean bowl for 75 minutes for a first rise, folding at 25 and 50 minutes, and 60 minutes for a second rise. Shaped carefully and proofed for 40 minutes, scored, and spritzed with water. Baked for 30 minutes at 425 degrees.


I posted the recipe on my blog, too.


So thank you David. Thanks also have to go out to Susan of Wild Yeast for inspiration due to the fact that I was browsing the Wild Yeast Blog when I thought about how good a simple bread would be with the locally homemade ham salad I bought today.

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