The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

bread machine

  • Pin It
LourdesPrincess's picture

Spaghetti Bread Failures

April 9, 2010 - 7:07am -- LourdesPrincess

Hello!


 


 We've been having trouble getting a good loaf of Spaghetti bread with our bread machine. Every time it either doesn't rise to the top of the pan or it sinks in the middle. The bread machine we have is Corner Bakery, Bread and Desert Maker from Breadman TM. Perhaps someone can tell me what these symptoms are from or maybe you have a no-fail spaghetti bread recipe? Any help is much appreciated!


 


Bernadette

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I've been baking artisanal bread only eight months. TFL has been my primary mentor, and inspiration. Prior, I baked bread, weekly, in our Zojirushi bread machine, dutifully turning out three loaves of sandwich white bread, or 40% whole wheat sandwich bread: machine kneaded and proofed, oven baked. For hearth-baked breads we sought out commercial bakeries--San Antonio in the winter months, eastern Connecticut in the summers. On rare occasions I'd buy a packaged bread mix, and bake it in our Zo; we were usually dissapointed.


Yesterday, I was rumaging around in a cupboard, looking for something. I didn't find what I was looking for, because far in the back I found a long-forgotten bread mix: 9 Grain, Hodgson Mill, at least a year old, likely even more ancient. Let me quickly add, I have never been employed by nor reimbursed in any way by Hodgson Mill--I don't even know what state they call home. Neither is it my intention to write this post to praise their mix, but as things turned out...


For the moment, I forgot what I'd been looking for. The bread mix caught my full attention. I opened it; the sealed-cellophane enclosed flour appeared bug free--hard to tell for certain among the ground seed specks scattered throughout. I was doubtful, however, about the yeast packet enclosed; I searched for a date stamp, but found none, and the label's ink looked...well, faded. I briefly considered tossing it all in the waste bin; my Yankee frugalness kicked in, and I considered saving the scant four cups of flour mix to incorporate into one of my future loaves.


Finally, I decided to just make it.


I got out the bread machine--we still use it every third or fourth week--to make our favorite sandwich breads, but it no longer has its own place on the kitchen counters. I tossed out the yeast packet, and substituted a tsp. and one-half from our freezer-kept IDY, known to be fresh. I put the machine on dough cycle, and bulk proofed the dough an additional forty-five minutes, for a total of one hour and fifty minutes. I panned it, and let it rise until slightly more than doubled, slashed it and baked it at the recommended 350°F. Other than replacing the yeast, extending the bulk-proofing time, slashing the top, and steaming for the first ten miuntes I followed the manufacturer's directions.






Nothing unrecognizeable (nor unprouncable) in the ingredients. I toasted two pieces this morning, and added a bit of butter and a dab of honey. Mmmm-m-m-m!


So what's the point?


For me, it was a reminder, and a little lesson in humility. I don't have to go to the obsessive degree I do to have good bread. Tasty and nutritious home-made bread is within reach of anyone willing to take a very few steps beyond grabbing a loaf in the bread aisle. I choose to bake because it's fun, and I get an ego boost proportional to the loaves' oven spring, its flavor, and my family's and friend's praises. But at the end of the day, I'm only doing what my ancestors have done, at times with only their hands for tools, and an open fire: baking our daily bread.


David G.

b2brechin's picture

can I use my bread machine with freshly ground flour?

January 22, 2010 - 2:11pm -- b2brechin

Hi, I have been using my bread machine with regular store-bought flour, but now I am about to buy a mill. I read in one book that a bread machine will not work well enough with the freshly ground whole wheat flour. I can't find any other info on this and thought maybe you guys can help.

Can I use my bread machine or am I going to have to buy something like the Kitchen Aid mixer?
And if so, what are some inexpensive options (less than $300)? (I don't have time to do it by hand)

wmtimm627's picture

Durum flour

January 5, 2010 - 11:41am -- wmtimm627
Forums: 

I recently found an Indian market that sells durum flour in 20 lb bags. To most of us, this is semolina flour. I'm having a hard time finding decent recipes for my bread machine that use this hard wheat flour. The best one I've used so far uses half bread flour and half semolina. It's delicious, but I'd like something different.

dragon49's picture

Salt Free BarleyBread Machine Bread

October 27, 2009 - 11:33am -- dragon49
Forums: 

I forgot to add salt to a Barley Bread recipe that I made up.  I was worried about an oversized Yeasty bread, or a Bread that had not formed correctly.  My internet research led me to sites that advised on not cutting out salt, as it regulates the yeast activity and helps form the bread.


 


None of this advice was true.  I suspect that the advice served to sell salt.  Other than being a little bland tasting, nothing was wrong with the Bread.  It formed and rose normally.

dragon49's picture

Opening the Top of the Bread Machine while Baking

October 6, 2009 - 4:28pm -- dragon49
Forums: 

I have been making some breads that rise so much, they are hitting the top of the glass of the Bread Machine.  If I open the top the Bread will have room to grow.  I would need to do this for the last 30 minutes of the cycle.  I am worried that doing so will lower the temperature inside the machine and the Bread will not properly bake.


 


Please advise.


 


Thanks

gtprice's picture
gtprice

For more years than I care to remember, Ive had an urge to make bread using natural leavening, ever since I picked up a lttle booklet on "Sourdough Bread," which included a packet of "sour dough starter;" at the San Franciso Airport while on a business trip long before my retirement in 1987. Mostly my efforts have been a disaster; because, I now believe, I've concentrated on the "sour dough" concept, trying to capture and propegate "natural yeasts," I must have a brown thumb when it comes to raising wild yeasts!!!!! Recently I abandoned my fixation on "sour dough" for I'm really not that into the unique taste; and now believe that what I really yearn for is the ability to make a good loaf of bread with leavening that I have nurtured from an initial package of store bought yeast, without any further use of such. It just seems so unnatural to have to buy and use a package of store bought yeast every time I make a loaf of bread. If I have to buy the yeast I might just as well buy a loaf of bread!!!! Today I produced my first loaf of edible bread using only 1 cup of flour, and two cups of, what amounts to a third generation, sponge.


I did this using a bread machine, because I'm also not that into hand kneading, and all that sticky dough.  


So here's my recipe


Starter: First Day - Two cups warm water, 1 tbsp suger, two cups all purpose flour. 1 pkg yeast.


           Second Day - Two cups warm water, 1 tbsp sugar, two cups all purpose flour


           Third Day - Remove two cups sponge, place in bread machine bucket. Allow to breed for several hours. Add 1 cup flour, and process on basic bread cycle. Then add two cups of water, 1 tbsp sugar, 2 cups flour to remainder of sponge.


Repeat third day routine for each subsequent loaf.


So all you "Artisen Bread" bakers out there - sent me your comments - favorable, or not!!!!!!

davidg618's picture
davidg618

My wife makes three loaves of light whole wheat bread, alternating every other week with an all-white flour version of the same recipe. Two of the loaves are our "daily bread", the third routinely goes to a neighbor. She uses our bread machine, a Zo, on the "Dough" setting, and does a 2nd bulk fermentation, panning and proofing, and baking outside the machine. The machine does a one hour bulk proof; her second bulk proof is usually 2 to 2-1/2 hours depending on the dough's behavior. The long bulk proofings allow the doughs, expecially the whole wheat version, a chance to develop good flavors.


Curious if I could convert the recipe to a sourdough, i scaled it to produce the same dough weight and hydration as the original recipe, but replaced some of the white flour and water with 240g of active sourdough starter at 60% hydration, built using the 3-build approach I use for all my sourdough formula.



The photo answers my curiousty with a firm yes.


However, the experiement taught me the question I should have asked: "Is it worth the additional time and effort?"


This bread is all one would ask for in a sandwich bread: excellent flavor; closed, but light and slightly chewy crumb; and a soft crust--even before I brushed them with butter. But I can say the same things about my wife's bread. Here's a photo of her all-white version I took a couple of weeks ago.



From my point-of-view we're going to stay with the tried and true Yvonne has baked for the last six years. Doing the sourdough was fun, and we will certainly enjoy eating the result.


Sometime in the future I'm going to see if I can be successful baking a single sourdough loaf entirely in the Zo. I think it's possible, in the programmable mode, using a very active starter, and removing the paddles after the knead step. This will allow up to a four hour bulk fermentation step. But that's for another day.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - bread machine