The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bourke Street Bakery book

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MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

Here is one of my recent bake from the Bourke Street Bakery cookbook, the Chorizo and Thyme roll.


The roll is really nice and the flavour is really well-balanced with chorizo and carmelised onion.


It was an easy and quick recipe, apart from slicing 500g of onions and having to cook them until they become really caramelised. But it's all worth it.


The recipe is also quite versatile that any filling combination is endless. I'm thinking chicken pesto with sundried tomato for my next bake.



For recipe you can see details in my blog http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/2010/10/chorizo-and-thyme-roll.html


Cheers,


Sue

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

 This loaf turn out to taste really nice with the nutty flavour and texture from soybean & linseed.


The recipe is adapted from Hamelman's multigrain sourdough and Bourke Street Bakery's soy and linseed sourdough. I basically followed Hamelman's method and recipe but replace the grains with soy and linseed to the equal amount.



I also noticed that my loaves rise really well this time. The bread structure also appeared to be well-developed (I think and I hope). I figure that this could be a result from a more mature/developed culture. I left the culture to ripe for about 19 hours this bake as oppose to the usual 12 hours.


 



Bread baking never ceases to excite me. There are lots of flavours and texture to explore. I've been baking bread for over 4 months now....but I'm still sitting in front of the oven looking at my babies being baked and risen to its full growth...at every bake....and still get excited every time. It has been such a satisfying experience.


 


 

welling's picture

Bourke Street Bakery Book

March 28, 2010 - 4:03am -- welling
Forums: 

I'm not a professional baker but i have been successfully baking as an amateur for a couple of years now. In this time I have learned a few basics, such as that strong white flour can absorb water of 60% of the flour weight (approximately). That is, 3/8 water to 5/8 flour. I know that this is flour dependent, but only within a couple of percent.

welling's picture
welling

I'm not a professional baker but i have been successfully baking as an amateur for a couple of years now. In this time I have learned a few basics, such as that strong white flour can absorb water of 60% of the flour weight (approximately). That is, 3/8 water to 5/8 flour. I know that this is flour dependent, but only within a couple of percent.


Today i tried to use the Bourke Street Bakery Cookbook to make simple white pizza dough. The recipe called for 600g flour and 445ml liquid (water, milk, oil). This equates to 74% liquid to flour weight. Needless to say, the dough resembled a batter and required several handfuls of flour to bring back to workable dough.


I normally use a Ciabatta dough for my pizza bases, so I am quite used to working with a wet dough, but this was rediculous. Luckily I have enough experience to know what to look for, but others may not be so fortunate. I will be interested to see how other recipes from this book work out.


I am keen to hear other's thoughts and experiences with this book.

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