The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

barley flour

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Franko's picture
Franko

Earlier this week while rummaging around in our local cookware store looking for unfluted French tart rings I spotted this nifty looking 18" long baguette style brotform.

I've seen them online in the past, never paying them much attention for some reason, but knew as soon as I picked this one up for a closer inspection I wouldn't be leaving the store without it. The idea of a dark, crusty loaf full of mixed grains and seeds contrasting with the white pattern of the brotform immediately came to mind rather than using it for a typical white baguette. While I continued my search for the tart rings I started considering possible recipe sources to use for the loaf I had in mind, thinking I'd likely find what I was looking for in Jan Hedh's “Swedish Breads & Pastries” or possibly Dan Lepard's “The Handmade Loaf“. After finally locating the one and only straight sided tart ring in the entire store, I drove home with the new purchases and immediately started going through my baking books looking for the type of bread I'd envisioned. Dan Lepard has a good looking formula for a Sunflower bread in his book that I almost went with, but it called for a levain and I'd already decided that I wanted to use a yeasted preferment of some kind for this loaf. As is often the case I found what I was looking for in Jeffrey Hamelman's “ Bread”. The two recipes I drew inspiration from were the Five Grain Bread with Pate Fermentee and his Sunflower Seed Bread with Pate Fermentee, on pages 129 and 131 of the book. Between the two, I opted for the higher percentage of pate fermentee he uses in the Five Grain Bread, swapped out the malt syrup used in his Sunflower Seed Bread for honey, and used an 80/10/10 combination of white AP flour, whole dark rye, and barley flour for the final mix.

 The percentages used in the initial formula came fairly close to giving me a workable mix, but needed a few adjustments for hydration, reflected in the formula below. The mix should be fairly slack, but not so much that developing it over the stretch and fold sessions becomes a matter of having to scrape it off the counter after the first S&F. The bread isn't as crusty as I'd hoped for, likely due to the higher percentage of honey used in the final mix, but I can live with that given the slightly sweet flavour and soft chewy texture of the crumb. For the next bake of this bread I'd like to include some of the   black currants we dehydrated last year in the mix to add a note of tart to the flavour profile. I'm sure this bread would lend itself to savoury additions such as cheese, fresh herbs or roasted onions as well. Formula and procedure included below. 

Best Wishes.

Franko

Procedure for Multi Grain Baguette with Seeds and Pate Fermentee 

  • Mix all ingredients for pate fermentee and let sit in a covered bowl for 14-16 hours @ 70F

  • Mix all ingredients for the multi grain soaker at same time as pate fermentee and leave in covered container at room temperature. 

  • Final dough:

    Mix the flours and pate fermentee with the water, adjusting for hydration if needed. Autolyse for 40 minutes. 

  • After autolyse is complete add the salt and instant yeast and mix till the dough is slightly developed. Add the grain soaker and honey and develop by either doing stretch and folds in the bowl or slap and folds on the counter until a slight windowpane can be achieved. The dough should be slightly sticky and moderately developed. 

  • Bulk ferment at 76F/24C for 90 minutes giving a full stretch and fold every 30 minutes.

  • After the last S&F round the dough to medium tight ball, cover and allow 15 -20 minutes for the dough to relax before shaping. 

  • Shape as a baguette or batard, and place seam side up in a floured brotform. 

  • Preheat the oven and baking stone to 485F/251C for 45-60 minutes prior to baking. 

  • Final rise of 45-50 minutes at 74F/23C covered with plastic sheet. 

  • Tip the loaf on to the underside of a parchment covered 18 ”/45cm long sheet pan or a peel if shaped as a batard. Score as desired, and slide loaf onto the preheated stone, with steam system in place and oven vents blocked. 

  • Bake at 485F/251C for 10 minutes, unblock the oven vents, remove the steam system and lower the heat to 465F/240C. 

  • Bake at 465F/240C for 10 minutes, rotating the loaf periodically for even colouring. Bake a further 10-15 minutes at 455F/235C or until the internal temperature is 210F/98.8C 

  • Turn the oven off, prop the door open slightly and leave the loaf in the oven for 20 minutes to cool gradually. 

  • Wrap the loaf in linen and place on a wire rack for 4-5 hours before slicing. 

  • NOTES: The bake times are based on a 680 gram loaf. Longer bake times will be needed for larger loaves. For transferring the loaf to the oven I recommend using parchment paper to avoid any likely sticking. The dough is soft and difficult to handle in a baguette shape. After the first 10 minutes of baking the parchment can be removed easily from beneath the loaf.

    Link to full sheet [HERE]

     

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Now that I finally made the famous Phil's 100% Whole Wheat Desem bread I figured it was time to push the envelope and put my own twist on it.  I love onions so I added some toasted onions and figured I would try to mix up the flour a bit by adding a small percentage of Quinoa and Barley flour.  Both of these flours impart a nice nutty flavor to the dough along with the toasted wheat germ I also added.  I also added some dehydrated onions since I ran out of the toasted onions and wanted to make sure I used enough in the recipe.  Just for the hell of it I added some pistachio oil to make it even more nutty tasting.

I refreshed my whole wheat starter I built for the last bake of 100% Whole Wheat Desem bread and the next day away we went with mixing the final dough.

Please see Phil's original recipe for his  formula for 100% Whole Wheat and his original procedures here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27999/honest-bread-100-wholewheat-desem-bread-and-some-country-bread.

Ingredients

243 grams (refreshed) Desem Starter

650 grams Whole Wheat (KAF 100% Organic)

130 grams Quinoa Flour

119 grams Barley Flour

20 grams Roasted Wheat Germ

838 grams Water (90 degrees F.)

20 grams Sea Salt (or table salt)

11 grams Toasted Onions

4 grams Dehydrated Onions (I ran out of the toasted so used this instead)

11 grams Pistachio Oil (you can omit if desired or use any nut oil or olive oil)

Procedure

Like the last bake I decided to change his procedures by using my Bosche Mixer as follows:

I mixed  the flours and wheat germ together with all the water except for 50 grams and let them autolyes for 1 hour.  I added the dried toasted onions to the remaining 50 grams of water.  After an hour  I added the levain and the water with onions, pistachio oil and salt and mixed on speed #1 for 1 minute and #2 for 4 minutes.  I then did a stretch and fold, rested the dough uncovered for 10 minutes.  I then did another stretch and fold, covered the dough and let it rest for 10 minutes.  I did one more stretch and fold and put it in a lightly oiled bowl for 1.5 hours.  I then put it in the fridge overnight.

The next day I let the dough sit out at room temperature for 1.5 hours.  After 1.5 hours I formed it into loaves and put them in floured bannetons and let them rise covered for 2 hours.  Score the loaves as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

I then baked on my oven stone with steam at 450 degrees until both loaves were golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 200 - 210 degrees F.

The bread had a great nutty flavor and you can taste the barley and quinoa flours for sure along with the onions.  The crumb was nice and moist and open with a nice dark medium hard crust.

isand66's picture
isand66

I recieved my new delivery from King Arthur Flour the other day so decided to use some of my new ingredients and threw together a sourdough bread with eggs and corn flour (it's supposed to be finer and less gritty than corn meal).  I also decided to add some Barley flour which I find adds a nice nutty flavor to the bread.  The final loaf was a little dense, but overall I was satisfied with the end result.   This bread is perfect for a hearty stew or simple toast and butter or jam in the morning.

Ingredients

15 ounces 65% Hydration Starter Refreshed

4 ounces Barley Flour (I use King Arthur Flour)

15.5 ounces European Style Flour from KAF (or Bread Flour)

2 ounces Corn Flour (King Arthur Flour)

2 Eggs beaten

1 Tablespoon Freeze Dried Shallots or fresh if preferred

14 ounces Luke warm water, 90 - 95 degrees Fahrenheit

2 1/2 Teaspoons Sea Salt

2 1/4 Teaspoons Instant Yeast  (you can omit the yeast if desired and let the dough sit for 1 1/2 hours to 2 hours before refrigerating)

Directions

Using your stand mixer or by hand, mix the water with the starter to break up the starter.

Add the flours, salt, yeast (if using), and mix on the lowest speed for 2 minutes.  Let rest for 5 minutes.

Mix for 4 minutes more on medium speed, adding more flour if necessary to produce a slightly sticky ball of dough.

Remove dough to your lightly floured work surface and need for 1 minute and form into a ball.

Leave uncovered for 10 minutes.

Do a stretch and fold and form into a ball again and cover with a clean moist cloth or oiled plastic wrap.

After another 10 minutes do another stretch and fold and put into a lightly oiled bowl that has enough room so the dough can double overnight.

Put in your refrigerator immediately for at least 12 hours or up to 3 days.

When ready to bake the bread, shape the dough as desired being careful not to handle the dough too roughly so you don't de-gas it. (If you did not use yeast, let it sit in your bowl for 2 hours before shaping).

Place it in your bowl, banneton or shape into baguettes.

Let it sit at room temperature for 2 hours covered with oiled plastic wrap or a wet cloth.

Pre-heat oven with baking stone (I use one on bottom and one on top shelf of my oven), to 500 degrees F.

Slash loaves as desired and place empty pan in bottom shelf of oven.

Pour 1 cup of very hot water into pan and place loaves into oven.

Lower oven to 450 Degrees and bake for 25 - 35 minutes until bread is golden brown and internal temperature reaches 200 degrees.

Let cool on cooling rack and enjoy!

This post has been submitted to the Yeast Spotting Site here: http://www.wildyeastblog.com/category/yeastspotting/.

Please feel free to visit my other blog for more of my recipes at http://www.mookielovesbread.wordpress.com

 

Crumb Shot

freerk's picture

what makes my multi grain tangzhong crack?

June 26, 2011 - 12:15pm -- freerk

I am currently in the process of  putting together a multi grain unenriched loaf, relying on the tangzhong method to keep it nice and fluffy. Here is the latest result from its prettiest side:

 

But this is what I would like to talk about: on the dark side of the moon this is what is going on

halimahanne's picture
halimahanne

Hello all!  I've been reading this site and playing with artisan breads for.. oh 6 weeks now.  Anyway, great site and great information, thanks!  


Recently I bought a cookbook called Good to the Grain which has recipes with a bunch of different flours, including brown butter scones with teff, buckwheat cookies and more.  So, being rather poor at following recipes, I decided to make something up with my stock of weird flours for extra flavors. O M G! I ate half of the first loaf the first day.  I'm not sure that I can describe the flavor...sweet and rich... thats not quite right.  But I would like to share, cuz it was so yummy.


Biga/Poolish thing:


50 g millet


70 g barley


40 g teff


170 g whole wheat


320 g water


1/8-1/4 tsp yeast


I made at night and put immediately in the fridge at 9:30 pm.


Final Dough


Biga/Poolish


180 g AP


tsp yeast 


85 g water (on the warmish side to warm up the cold dough)


17 g salt (TB)


 


Autolyse 30 minutes without salt.  Added salt and did the French slap fold thing for maybe 5 minutes (where you pick it up bang the end on the table, stretch and fold it over).  Then I did 3-4  envelope thingys over the next 3 hours.  Shaped (not so good at that yet), rose and baked at 500 5 minutes with steam and then turned down to 450.  Not sure how long, used a thermometer  for doneness.


I want to try other breads (I have a starter in the fridge) yet I'm making this again for tomorrow! I'm addicted. Let me know what you think!  Thanks, Halimah

jschoell's picture
jschoell

This is my second experiment with using beer brewing methods to make a bread.


This time I wanted to see how the flovor of hops would taste in a baked loaf. 



barley flour soaker. Leave at room temp overnight.


 



1 lb of malted barley of your choice... I used 90% special B and 10% chocolate malt. Place grains in a large pot and cover with water (no more than 2 cups) Slowly raise temp until it reaches 160F, then turn off heat, cover, and let sit for an hour. strain the liquid into a new pot. Save the spent grain for other fun stuff. 


 



add whole hops to the strained wort, and begin the boil. Boil for 30 minutes, keeping a loose cover on the pot to prevent evaporation. Allow to cool to room temp. Strain out the hops and your wort is ready to add to the dough!


 


Combine the flour, salt, sugar, and yeast. Whisk together. Tear up the soaker and add to the flour mixture. Add oil, wort and water. Mix until you get a ball, then transfer to stand mixer.



knead for 5 minutes, rest for 2 minutse and knead 2 minutes more.


Place dough in oiled bowl and refrigerate at overnight or longer if needed. 



On baking day: Remove dough from fridge and allow to reach room temp, about an hour. Stretch and fold and place back into bowl. After 30 minutes, do this again. ferment until dough reachews 1.5x original size. Divide into 2-3 pieces depending on size of loaves desired (I made two, but I think smaller loaves would be better for a more open crumb). Allow to proof for and hour. Preheat oven to 500F. Add water to steam pan, insert the loaves and reduce temp to 450. After 15 minutes, rotate and reduce temp to 350. Bake for 30 minutes or until center of dough reaches 200f. 




The finished bread had a moist, chewy sandwich bread texture. It is not very sweet. I does have a nice malt flavor and i can detect a little of the hop bitterness and flavor. I think I'll add more hops next time!


NOTE: all these amounts are approximate!


SOAKER


2 cups barley flour


a few grains of instant yeast


enough water to make a sticky paste (about a cup... I didn't take exact measurements.)


FINAL DOUGH


about 3 cups bread flour


2 tsp salt


3 tsp raw sugar


1 tsp instant yeast


1 tbsp canola oil


about 1 cup of cooled wort


about 3/4 cup water 


 

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