The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

banneton

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scottsourdough's picture

Moldy banneton

March 28, 2010 - 5:37am -- scottsourdough

When I reached for my banneton this morning I was in for a big surprise. The entire bottom of the banneton was covered in blue mold! Obviously, I decided to hold off on using it for now.


Has this happened to anyone else? I keep my banneton in a a plastic bag, but it isn't sealed like a ziploc. From what I'ver heard, it seems most people allow some flour to stay in the grooves of their bannetons. I leave some flour in the grooves, but not an excessive amount. I'm not sure what caused the mold. The only thing I can think of is that it should have been in a sealed bag.

Jessica Weissman's picture

Brotforms and dry tops

February 24, 2010 - 10:29am -- Jessica Weissman

I've been raising my standard loaves in brotforms for quite a while.  Lately I've been getting blowouts rather than nice expansion.  It almost seems as though the top crust (the one that rests on the bottom when the loaf is rising in the basket) is drying out a little.  Feeling the tops of the loaves confirms this.  They dough is reasonably hydrated, but not at crazy ciabatta levels or anything.  I'd be more specific, but this is happening with a variety of recipes.


I bake on a stone, and use ice melting in a hot pan for steam.

maryserv's picture

found great price on coiled wicker baskets for final proofing

January 20, 2010 - 9:17pm -- maryserv

Hello all,


I've been on a quest to find a reasonable priced coiled wicker dough-rising basket.  I finally found it but it requires a $50 dollar order to even place the order (they are wholesale to public).  And yes, even when I order 2 of all: round, oval, rectangular - and throw something else in I'm still not to $50.  If anyone is the in the Houston, Texas area and is looking, I'm happy to combine orders.  Or I suppose I could order, receive and then send on to you if you are not local.  The prices are crazy-good for untreated rattan coiled baskets - $6 each. 

milwaukeecooking's picture
milwaukeecooking

Sun-dried parmesan bread


This was my kitchen sink recipe.  I accidentally made too much baguette dough so I decided to throw some of it in my banneton with a few added extras.  I had sun-dried tomatoes around and I had recently ground up some parmesan.  So, I thought, why not mix it into my extra dough.  Before putting it into the oven I spritzed it with water and gave it a sprinkling of cracked pepper.  Out of all the breads I have made this one actually made my mouth water when it was baking.  The smell was incredible.  Here is how I made it. 


Follow my poolish recipe for the dough.  I made 900 grams of dough for this recipe.


After the second rise lightly flatten out the dough into a square that is roughly 12"x12".  On one half of it sprinkle 1/4 cup ground parmesan cheese and then, on top of that, gently press in 1 cup of chopped sun-dried tomtatoes.  Leave 1/2 inch of dough around the edges so that you can seal it back up again.  Fold the empty side over the top of the tomatoes and press down on the edges to seal.  Flatten the dough slightly and business fold it into thirds (like you are mailing a business letter).  Let your dough rest for 5 min and business fold again.  I folded mine three times. 


At this point you should have a few layers of tomato and you will want to shape your dough into a boule.  You don't need a banneton for this because all of the folding and shaping has made your dough fairly tough and it will stand on its own.  However, let your boule rise for an hour, until doubled, before baking. 


Pre-heat the oven to 500F while your dough is rising.


Right before baking spritz your boule with water and top with pepper.  You need the pepper...trust me. 


 Spray the walls of your oven with water and bake for 2 minutes.  Repeat.  Repeat.  Turn the heat down to 425


Bake again for 20 min at 425.


Rotate your bread 180 degress and turn the heat down to 400 and bake for 20 min.  


Check the temp of your bread.  If the internal temperature isn't over 195 it isn't done.  The optimal temp is between 195 and 205. 


I wanted to take pictures of the crumb so you could see the tomato goodness inside but it got eaten before I could remember.  Next time I will post a picture of the crumb.  This is a recipe that I would like to re-create again. 


sun-dried parmesan bread


http://veggieinmilwaukee.wordpress.com

saraugie's picture
saraugie

I want to purchase Brotforms and/or Bannetons and need some advice.


Lined or unlined, that is the question ? I'd hoped to stop at that one question, since I could use the Shakespeare ending, I will anyway :)


I want to get one round and one oval, what sizes should they be ?

mabaker's picture

Do you use Bannetons for all of your breads?

January 6, 2010 - 10:10am -- mabaker

Hi!


 


I usually make breads with prefermented dough- like Pain Paysan, French Bread, beer bread etc...


These doughs are pretty stable...after reviewing this forum I saw that many of you are using the proofing baskets.


Do you use it for any bread or mostly to high hydrated breads like the sour dough.


 


Just curious....


 


Going to do my first order from FSBI so if you have some recommendations...please do!


 


Thanks!!!

HunterS's picture
HunterS

Greetings Freshloafers. . . 


 


I've been lurking on this site for way too long without making a post and for the first time I took a pictures of a bake I had this past weekend!  The loafs are 10% whole rye 10% whole wheat 80% general mills gold medal bread flour.  There were all leavened with a 100% hydration sourdough starter made with bread flour.  This is the first time I used white rice flour to dust my bannetons/baskets and I it worked wonderfully, no sticking at all after proofing overnight!


 


 I proofed the loafs overnight at approximately 50 degrees Fahrenheit for 12 hours and used cornmeal for dusting the peal.  I am lucky enough to have family members that have a 50+ year-old Baker's Pride stone lined pizza oven in the their kitchen which I cranked up to 500-600 degrees to bake the loafs:


Oven closed


The Oven takes about 3 hours to get fully heated and can get as hot as 800 degrees. . . great for pizzas! 


Oven inside


Since it is a pizza oven it only has a height of about 12" so no huge loafs. . .   In order to create steam I placed a tin bowl filled with river stones in to which I poured into after the loafs were loaded.  I was also sure to bake all four loafs off at the same time since a full oven produces its own steam.


unbaked loafs


Two of loafs were proofed in cheap 1 dollar baskets:



and two were proofed in nice willow bannetons.  The dough was made using only one build.  I mixed all the ingredients in a 20 quart hobart mixer on speed 2 until the dough was ready then I let the dough rest for a few hours folding it every hour or so.  I used 2 lbs of dough in the cheap baskets and 1.5lb in the nice willow bannetons.  I forget to mention that I added some soaked wheat berries into the mix as well to give the crumb some texture.  Before presenting you with the next pictures let me explain that I have never had the opportunity to bake directly on stone in a very hot oven and therefore was not prepared for the crazy awesome oven bloom I got on my loafs!  I only put very smalls cuts into the loaf which led to this:



This loaf was the most affected by the heavy oven bloom.  


 


In case you are wondering I baked them this dark because I like my bread that way.  


Here are the rest:


circle cut FAIL haha


Super bloom!  Next time I will make deeper cuts. . .



Oh yes. . . 


I learned from this bake that baking good bread is most affected by the oven you are baking in then anything else in my opinion.  It is hard to beat baking a wood fired stone oven or even a vintage stone lined pizza oven like the one that was used in this bake.  Also cheap dollars baskets work just as well as imported german willow bannetons. . . . I forgot to take a picture of the crumb but it was very nice! Maybe I will add it later.


 


 


 

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