The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts


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johannesenbergur's picture


  • 1 dl (100g) lukewarm to warm water
  • ½ dl (50g) plain naturel yogurt
  • 15g fresh active yeast
  • 8 g honey
    (pref. liquid)
  • 10 g sea salt
  • 10 g olive oil
    (this is a minimum, feel free to use more, I reckon 25g would be ideal)
  • 250g various types of flour, I used and recommend:
    30g Graham flour
    70g semolina flour
    150g wheat baking flour
  • Poppy or sesame seeds or for sprinkle

This recipe is very small, the smallest I've ever made. Usually I double the ingredients mentioned, except for the yeast, the dough rises just fine with 15g.


(Work: 20 mins - 1st rise: 30 mins - work: 5 mins - 2nd rise: 35 mins - bake: 30 mins)
Estimated time from start to finish: 2 hours 

Mix the warm water and yogurt, so you get a tepid mixture. Add the yeast and stir till dissolved. Add salt and honey and dissolve. Add the flour to the mixture, I ususally add 100g, mix and add then add more.

Knead the dough for approximately 10 minutes, put it into an oiled container, cover it with a hot teatowel and leave it to rise for 30 mins or so, can be more or less, usually more means better and less means less good.

Should be doubled after half an hour and shape it into a loaf. Place the loaf onto your baking surface of choice. Pat the bread with milk and sprinkle the seeds on top of it. Cover it again with a warm towel and let it rise for 30-60 minutes; Afterwards put the loaf into your oven.

Bake for approximately 30 minutes, until the crust is golden and it makes that hollow sound you know so well, when you knock on the bottom of it.


mcs's picture

 This past week (June 5-11) May visited the Back Home Bakery from the L.A. area for her internship.  During the week we had the usual work-load plus a bunch of extra palmiers and baguettes for a special order.  The area she felt she improved on the most was controlling the factors to get the desired dough temperatures in both loaf breads and laminated doughs.  Although I'd like to think that being in the bakery was her main highlight of the trip, seeing this as we were coming home from the Tuesday night farmers' market was probably at the top of the list. 
Thanks for the hard work May, and for spoiling Hoku rotten.


May working on the 20qt mixer while we start the rolls


shaping as I record times in the background





cookingwithdenay's picture

3 States Awaiting Governor Signatures on Cottage Food Laws

June 7, 2011 - 11:53am -- cookingwithdenay

Just an FYI! There are 3 states currently waiting on their Governors to sign and pass their state Cottage Food Laws. The states are Florida, Illinois and Texas (the bills are currently on the Governors' desk). The cottage food law in Washington state should go into effect in late July or early August (it was passed). Bakers are still trying to get support from legislators in California. Keeping your fingers crossed.

Happy Baking !


cookingwithdenay's picture

Illinois residents to sell home-baked goods at farmers markets

May 27, 2011 - 2:38pm -- cookingwithdenay

A bill that would allow Illinois residents to sell home-baked goods at farmers markets is headed to the governor's desk. Senate Bill 840, which passed the General Assembly Friday, would allow the sale of home-baked "non-potentially hazardous food," such as bread and cookies, at farmers markets and community events.  It also allows for the sale of jam, jelly and fruit butter.


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