The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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KittenMitten's picture

Toaster Ovens

October 27, 2009 - 9:26pm -- KittenMitten

Hello all!


Was wondering if baking in a toaster oven is any different from a "normal" oven - the kind that's usually wall-mounted. What is your experience?


I'm not too sure what my current wall-mounted oven is - it does have a heating element on the bottom though.

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci


A friend on Foodbuzz was looking for a way to use Ficoco - fig jam with cocoa. In Italy sugar was expensive to produce so many things were made with jams or mosto cotto (grape syrup) to sweeten cakes, cookies etc. Itlians have many jam filled cookies and ficoco would be perfect for raviolo dolci, in fact figs were also used to make mosto cotto. A recipe we make during holidays, Ravioli Dolci is a great way to use different jam fillings and make your cookie different everytime.


http://turosdolci.wordpress.com/2009/10/22/ravioli-dolci-di-pulgia/ 


 



 

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci

I spent my summers on Cape Cod where there were cranberry bogs in our back yard. After the harvest was over there were often many berries just lying on top of the bog that got missed in the harvest and we would collect them and make muffins, cranberry bread and mix them with apple pie - they add a little tartness to the pie that I really like. 


View my recipe for Cranberry Walnut bread  at


http://turosdolci.wordpress.com

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci


In Italy desserts are often flavored with honey, chestnuts, pine nuts, hazelnuts and almonds. Cantucci originated in the Tuscany and it is thought that they were flavored with almonds from Prato. They can be found in every pasticceria in the Tuscany. Cantucci are mostly eaten with a glass of “Vin Santo” a sweet wine. Many restaurants serve small almond biscotti with coffee and some will have a bowl of them on the table at all times. It is probably the most well-known and popular biscotti in Italy.


Following is our family recipe for cantucci. Make a full recipe and stored in a metal container, they will last a few weeks. They can be frozen up to two months – they defrost very quickly. You will always have biscotti to serve with coffee when friends drop by. 



If this link doesn't connect, go to http://turosdolci.wordpress.com



http://turosdolci.wordpress.com/2009/08/01/almond-biscotti-“cantucci”-recipe/




 


 

 

mcs's picture
mcs

...and rounding up this year's interns at the Back Home Bakery was Brendan visiting from Washington, DC.  He came prepared with two-handed-roll-making-skills and a willingness to work his hardest at everything.  Thanks a lot Brendan for all of the help;  hope to see you running your own bakery some day.


-Mark


http://TheBackHomeBakery.com



shaping rye, stretch and fold on 15# Rustic White, ready to sell on a chilly Saturday morning

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci


Taralli are a biscuit that is eaten by Italians any time of the day. It should be named the national biscotti because taralli are enjoyed by young and old. Wheather it is for breakfast, as a snack, dunked in wine, as a treat for children, they are a biscuit that fills every occasion.  They can be found  in every bakery, market and in every Italian home.  There are many preparations of taralli, but the one here is from the village where my grandparants come from, "Vieste (FG) Italy".


Puglian Taralli
Recipe Summary
Prep Time: 50 minutes 
Cook Time: 20-25 minutes @ 375 degrees F 
Yield: 5 Dozen


Dry Ingredients


3 cups all-purpose flour, unbleached


2 cups semolina flour


2 teaspoons dry yeast


1 teaspoon salt


2 tablespoons fennel seeds, lightly crushed, or 1 tablespoon crushed black peppercorns, or 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes


WET INGREDIENTS


1 cup dry white wine, warmed


1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil, warmed


DOUGH


Sprinkle the yeast over the warm wine and let it stand for several minutes, then stir it into the wine and mix well.  In a large bowl put all the remaining ingredients and your chosen seasoning. Mix and knead well until the dough is smooth and elastic.  Return to a clean bowl and cover the dough with plastic wrap or a dampened towel and let it rise for 30 minutes or longer in a warm place.


ASSEMBLY


Divide the dough into pieces. Roll them into 1/2” cylinders. Cut them into 6” lengths. Bring the two ends together and join them to make a round doughnut - like shape. Press your thumb on the ends to seal them.


BOILING


Bring a pot of salted water to a boil and drop the taralli in a few at a time. When the taralli rise to the surface, remove them and put them on a clean towel to dry.


BAKE


Arrange the boiled taralli on a cookie sheet and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes, until they are golden brown.


Note:  When crushing the black pepper, do not use a grinder.  The finely ground powder from the pepper will make the taralli taste hot.  Use only hand crushed pieces.


 An old Italian say: "No matter what the argument, it can be resolved with a glass of wine and a handfull of taralli"


bobkay1022's picture

Bread/Convection/Microwave combined baking.

September 29, 2009 - 10:49am -- bobkay1022

I have a Sharp Micro/conv. oven  The manual says use low mix bake for bread/rolls . It also will let you put in a different temp than the 325 Degree normal and time. My recipes calls for pre heat. Sharp manual says no pre heat needed.  I have tried 40-50 lbs of flour over the last 4-5 months and have never got a good loaf of bread no matter what way I bake. convection alone or combo from manual.


Has any one had any luck . I lower temp25 degrees if convection only.

MISSiShrimpi's picture

Baking on Grill without charbroiled mess

September 25, 2009 - 7:39pm -- MISSiShrimpi

Hi Everyone!


I have tried and tried and tried again to bake on my gas grill and


all I get is a charred piece of nothing. I only have two burners set


as low as they will go. I have tried with and without my baking stone


with same results. I'm even using a cast iron Dutch oven set on top


my stone. Guess the real question might be what the temperature


inside should be, any one know? Seems like the big difference between


an oven and a grill is the oven has a thermostat and turns off whereas

JeremyCherfas's picture
JeremyCherfas

I went to a really interesting bread-making course about 10 days ago, and have simply not had time to write it up yet. One thing I did want to share though, was a film we were shown. It is called Les blés d'or, and was made by ADDOCS, a French film-making organization.


The film is about peasant bakers (and the word peasant is used as a badge of pride, with no pejorative undertones) who have rescued several old varieties of wheat and who bake in the traditional manner. The commentary is all in French (although the DVD for sale has other languages, including Italian but not English (yet)). I found it fascinating, especially the sequence that shows the mixing of the dough.


The recipe is very simple: 33 kg of flour, 22 litres (i.e. 22 kg) of water and half a bucket (maybe 5 litres?) of starter. And the entire mass is mixed by hand. It is absolutely glorious to watch, and if you've never seen a baker stretch and fold 55 kg -- more than his own body weight, I'm sure -- of dough, you have a real treat in store.


You can watch the video streaming in reasonable quality from the ADDOCS site. It is the second film down in the list on the right. I hope you enjoy it.


In view of an earlier post I was thrilled to see a loaf made from Touzelle what flash up on screen, albeit very briefly.


Jeremy

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