The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bakers stone

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Knit-Baker's picture

Baking Stone Gift

December 25, 2012 - 12:39pm -- Knit-Baker

I received an Emile Henry Baking Stone for Christmas. I have  periodically baked bread, kneading it in my KitchenAid Mixer and had planned to buy a couple of loaf pans this weekend. Well, I don't need those now. Just made my first loaf on the  stone, ready in 12 minutes (instead of 30)  it tastes amazing with a great crust. 

tametcalf's picture

Any modifications needed for baking on a stone vs pan?

February 18, 2010 - 11:32am -- tametcalf
Forums: 

Hi,


 


I'm new here and also new to making breads (other than using breadmachine). A couple weeks ago I started making simple Boule that I found in "5 minutes a day for fresh bread". 


 


I was going to try a different recipe I found in a bread book. The recipe says to put it in a bread loaf pan. Is there any modification to the recipe if I want to make more of a round artisan sytle of bread?


 


Thanks and I'll keep reading the forums & lessons.


-T

HunterS's picture
HunterS

Greetings Freshloafers. . . 


 


I've been lurking on this site for way too long without making a post and for the first time I took a pictures of a bake I had this past weekend!  The loafs are 10% whole rye 10% whole wheat 80% general mills gold medal bread flour.  There were all leavened with a 100% hydration sourdough starter made with bread flour.  This is the first time I used white rice flour to dust my bannetons/baskets and I it worked wonderfully, no sticking at all after proofing overnight!


 


 I proofed the loafs overnight at approximately 50 degrees Fahrenheit for 12 hours and used cornmeal for dusting the peal.  I am lucky enough to have family members that have a 50+ year-old Baker's Pride stone lined pizza oven in the their kitchen which I cranked up to 500-600 degrees to bake the loafs:


Oven closed


The Oven takes about 3 hours to get fully heated and can get as hot as 800 degrees. . . great for pizzas! 


Oven inside


Since it is a pizza oven it only has a height of about 12" so no huge loafs. . .   In order to create steam I placed a tin bowl filled with river stones in to which I poured into after the loafs were loaded.  I was also sure to bake all four loafs off at the same time since a full oven produces its own steam.


unbaked loafs


Two of loafs were proofed in cheap 1 dollar baskets:



and two were proofed in nice willow bannetons.  The dough was made using only one build.  I mixed all the ingredients in a 20 quart hobart mixer on speed 2 until the dough was ready then I let the dough rest for a few hours folding it every hour or so.  I used 2 lbs of dough in the cheap baskets and 1.5lb in the nice willow bannetons.  I forget to mention that I added some soaked wheat berries into the mix as well to give the crumb some texture.  Before presenting you with the next pictures let me explain that I have never had the opportunity to bake directly on stone in a very hot oven and therefore was not prepared for the crazy awesome oven bloom I got on my loafs!  I only put very smalls cuts into the loaf which led to this:



This loaf was the most affected by the heavy oven bloom.  


 


In case you are wondering I baked them this dark because I like my bread that way.  


Here are the rest:


circle cut FAIL haha


Super bloom!  Next time I will make deeper cuts. . .



Oh yes. . . 


I learned from this bake that baking good bread is most affected by the oven you are baking in then anything else in my opinion.  It is hard to beat baking a wood fired stone oven or even a vintage stone lined pizza oven like the one that was used in this bake.  Also cheap dollars baskets work just as well as imported german willow bannetons. . . . I forgot to take a picture of the crumb but it was very nice! Maybe I will add it later.


 


 


 

Glacrwlf's picture

Petalite baking stone?

December 16, 2009 - 10:56am -- Glacrwlf

Has anyone ever heard of the mineral called "Petalite"? It's a lithium feldspar that, when used to bake, radiates infrared rays that exceed that of a stone oven. It's supposed to create really good bread! I watched "Yakitate!! Japan" to find that out. Can I really use it in clay, and more importantly, can I use it to make a mold with volcanic rock? Please help me!

Gadjowheaty's picture

Hi from kid baker, returned

November 23, 2009 - 8:49am -- Gadjowheaty

Hi All -


Fantastic site, just wanted to say hello.  My story is that I began life as a kid cook close to 40 years ago, by first baking and pastry making, then, with the seed given as a present by way of Jacques Pepin's La Technique, working it cover to cover, I began a life in French cooking. (few pics):


 


Braised lamb shank, flageolets

corkysmom's picture
corkysmom

What is a bakers stone ?  Can someone please send a pic of one please!!

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