The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

baguette

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xaipete's picture
xaipete

OK, so I know it sounds like an oxymoron, but it works! Baguette dough is one of my favorite pizza doughs because it is easy to handle, has just a hint of sweetness, and bakes up as a sturdy, crisp, and thin platform (no sagging) that works no matter whether the topping be light or heavy. I baked this in the oven on my new stone (I didn't want to risk repeating last Friday's BBQed-beyond-all-recognition pizza). I had planned to top it with some pesto and fresh basil, but the pesto had molded and the basil, shriveled, so I just went with sauce and fresh mozzarella.


Neapolitan style pizza


--Pamela

proth5's picture
proth5

For those of you following baguette quests, a new "Best Baguette in Paris" has been named:  M. Frank Tombarel at his boulangerie Le Grenier de Felix, 64 Avenue Felix Faure (XVeme).


We have high hopes that Janedo can quickly make a trip there to learn his secrets.... :>)


Happy Baking!

IanT's picture

baguette:very hard tough crust...not so many bubbles, help!

February 14, 2009 - 6:01pm -- IanT
Forums: 

Alright ... tried this recipe the other day (a few times...3 to be exact...) first time making bread in quite some time... I want to really start baking a lot, as i love bread. but also because id like to donate alot of it to people and families in need...kind of just a personal thing... ok...


 


this is my recipe I used (from foodnetwork.com):


 

dontblamethebread's picture
dontblamethebread

I have been trying to be able to emulate the french baguette and I have yet to find the right formula. King Arthur flour does not cut it in my opinion. Anyone who can recommend a good flour? I want a exrtmely light baguette with a crisp snap and big whole crumb stgructure. I have tried recipes from Artisan Baking Across America, King Arthurs recipe and the Bread Makers Apprentice but helas they don't come close. They look good and taste ok but I am still in the quest for it.


Any advise greatly appreciated.


 


Carl

mcs's picture

a short baguette video

December 19, 2008 - 3:23pm -- mcs
Forums: 

Fresh Loafians,
I just made a short video on pre shaping and shaping baguettes using the Anis 75% hydration dough.  If you'd like to check out the entry in my blog it's this entry: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/9959/more-anis-baguettes


If you'd like to just see the video, here it is.
I never quite got the 'classical technique' of shaping them, so this is the 'only way I can do it' style.
-Mark
http://thebackhomebakery.com

fredsambo's picture
fredsambo

So it has been a while since my last post, I guess it was a busy summer, LOL.

 

I made some simple baguettes today. I did a 4 hour poolish and then mixed up an ordinary french bread recipe (water, salt, flour, poolish). I then put the dough in the refrigerator, since I wanted to go to bed (9pm). My wife took it out at five this morning and this is what it looked like at seven, when I got up:

 

First Rising

 

I cut the dough into four somewhat equal pieces and shaped them into logs; I set aside the fourth piece for my next batch.

Preshape

 

Then I let them sit on the "bench" for an hour.

Covered with a dish towel.

 

After pacing around drinking coffee for the longest hour ever, I flattened out all of the air...

Flatten

 

...and rolled them into baguettes.

Baguettes!

 

Now, I usually cover my french bread with a big pot, to emulate steam injection, but alas, these baguettes were too long! My solution was to start off at 550 degrees preheated for an hour and then carefully pour 1/2 cup of water into a small cast iron skillet, closing the door quickly. I think the key is keeping the oven above 450 degrees the whole time, since the evaporated water will make the temp drop dramatically. My water never stopped boiling and the steam cloud upon opening the door was impressive. CAUTION: A lot of steam comes out of the oven when first opened up, don't go sticking your face down there!

Skillet

 

After proofing for another hour I scored and then brushed them with plenty of water. Once they hit the stone I turned the temperature down to 500 degrees for four minutes, then removed the skillet and turned the temp down to 450 for the remaining time.

Ready to go!

 

I am pretty happy with the results, although they could be darker, but they taste wonderful!

Baguettes

 

I am making a country style next, with the old dough I saved from this batch!

 

Happy Baking!

redcatgoddess's picture
redcatgoddess

This is the most basic & easiest to acheve Baguette formula from Le Cordon Bleu (where I am trained).  This formula will yeild about 3 22" classic baguette.  You can use this recipe for

 805 g bread flour

16 g salt

6 g instant yeast (or 18 g fresh or 9 g active)

523 g water (or 511g if fresh yeast is used, or  520g for active yeast)

 

This is what we called "straight dough," basically, everyone comes to the party!

  1. Mix the dry ingredients together, includes the yeast (active or fresh yeast needs to disolved in the wtaer 1st.
  2. Add the water to the dry.  Now, just mix the dough w/ you hand, until there is no dry or wet spot (and yes, the dough is still VERY sticky at this point and I know, but just leave it).  Cover it with the mixing bowl & let rest for 5 minutes.
  3. Remove the dough and knead/throw the dough (and yes, it will stick to the counter top or board, but please do NOT use any more flour, additional flour WILL change the formula.  Just knead the dough until it is not longer stick to your tough about 5 - 10 minutes.  Cover the dough w/ the mixing bowl again, let stand for another 5 minutes.
  4. Remove the dough and LIGHTLY knead it until the dough starts to show a little tearing on the side of the dough. 
  5. LIGHLY spray the mixing bowl w/ commerica pan spry (to make sure the dough doens't stick to the bowl, then cover w/ the plastic wrap.  Let ferment for 45 minutes (yes.. that's all it takes).
  6. After 45 minutes, slowing & lightly (use a bowl scraper) 'flap' the dough upside down onto the counter, then lightly pat out the large air bubbles & fold the dough into 3rd (3 folds).  Put the semi-rectangula/long dough back to the bowl, cover, let rest for another 45 minutes.
  7. Use a bowl scraper, 'flap' the dough from the bowl & dived into 3 potions (about 450 g each).  Lightly pat out large air cells, 3 folds, cover w/ plastic wrape and let rest for 10 minutes.
  8. Shaping... seal the seam of the baguette dough by firmly push the seem against the counter (as if you are chopping it, then start from the middle of the dough, slowly roll out the length of the baguette.  Then place the shaped dough onto a inverted baking sheet w/ springle of cornel, parchment, corn meal (pan, corn meal, parchment, corn meal).
  9. After shaping, spry the shaped baguette w/ either commerical pan spry or warm water, then cover w/ plastic wrap again, and let it bench rest for 20 minutes.
  10. Scoring... use a lame or sharp knife. Slash the baguette 5 or 7 times at 45 degree angle & about 4" long on the surface of the baguette.  The angel of the slach should look about 20 degree.
  11. Baking... 400F w/ 8 minutes of steam + 12 minutes = 20 minutes + extra minutes for desired crust color. Now, if you are a home baker, make sure you spry the baguette w/ WARM water HEAVILY then bake at preheated 400 F oven, about 20+ minutes, depends on the desired color.
  12. DO NOT CUT OPEN THE BAGUETTE UNLESS IT'S COMPLETELY COOLED!!!  Restaurants have us thinking WARM bread is the best, however, if you are cutting open a warm baguette, your 2 hrs work has just down the drain for nothing.  It has to be cool, please... another 30 minutes will not kill you...

I made the following Epi w/ this formula.
Epi

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