The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

baguette

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jennyloh's picture
jennyloh





I had an interesting bake today. Using the 5 minutes a day fresh baked bread recipe, I decided to try my hand on baguette again. 

 


The result was quite satisfying. Large holes,  crunchy crust,  and when I press down,  it bounces back.  The taste is quite interesting,  even though I didn't put much salt,  it is quite salty on the crust.
check out the details of the recipe and method here.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Shiao-Ping's excellent post on Mr. Nippon's Baguette formula and the images of her crumb and those in the book inspired me. From what I can tell, the 12 hour cool autolyse as a significant effect on the dough. The dough is sticky as Shiao-Ping cautioned and acted differently from any other 75% hydration dough I have worked with. It was trying to wind it's way up the shaft of the dough hook on my DLX mixer for one thing. It was window paining BEFORE kneading. After an initial mixing with the hook, I let it set for 15 minutes to allow the salt time to melt and the pinch of IDY time to incorporate before kneading for 1 minute on first speed and only 2 minutes on speed 2. The dough was smooth and silky from the first seconds of kneading. Quite beautiful really, if you know what I mean. I had pulled a small amount of dough after the initial 15 minute pause since it looked so smooth and was surprised to see how transparent the film was. After 2 minutes on speed level 2, I stopped and placed the dough in a lightly oiled plastic container and proceeded with the stretch and fold procedure that SP laid out. The total bulk ferment time was 3 hours with 5 S&F's.


One issue I had was that the 12 hour autolyse is supposed to be done at 60F. I looked around the kitchen for a drafty garage door that would serve as a place to maintain the cool temperature I had established with cool water. It worked out perfectly. The outside temp was a balmy 5F this morning and my bowl of autolyse flour and water measured at 61F. However, after adding the starter, salt and IDY together the DDT is 22C or about 72F. The friction factor isn't any where near that spread so I floated the dough bowl in warm water during the first 20 minutes in preparation for the first S& F. It worked out fine but it's a little clumsy having to make that adjustment. I wanted to follow the protocol as closely as I could and being wildly off the DDT would be a big error.


Shaping and proofing was as normal. I wanted to try the scoring pattern of SP's second set of images where the chef is trying to suggest wind in his slashing pattern. To me it looks like a series of slashes that wrap the long loaf with one following the last and the gaps bridged by another set of cuts. I won't pretend to suggest that it turned out anywhere near the chefs pattern. It took me a few years to be just moderately proficient at the traditional pattern. This is way harder but I will continue to practice. I think the effect of so many cuts will be to allow the crumb to expand more giving room for that airy open crumb structure. We will see. As I write this, I have just removed the three baguettes from the oven. I spritzed 2 of the loaves and left one with the surface flour on it. I can see I should of cut deeper already.


I will cut one open and we shall see if we are going out for dinner or not.


Eric






breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,


I'm sure you've seen my post here venting about my breads not turning out very well:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/16100/perfect-baguette-eludes-me-my-breads-are-getting-worse


Anyway, I was inspired to try a Pain a' l'ancienne Baguette from here:


http://www.applepiepatispate.com/bread/pain-ancienne-french-baguette/


Of course, I can't seem to stick to recipes, so here is what I did instead:





Total Ingredients:


350g AP (Whole Foods 365)


100g BF (KA Bread Flour)


100g Graham Flour (Bob's Red Mill)


350g Water


10g Kosher Salt


100g Firm Sourdough Starter (60% Hydr. straight from fridge)


2g Active Dry Yeast (1/2 tsp)


Total Dough Weight 937g


Directions:


Day 1


Make soaker with the following:


175g AP


100g BF


50g Graham Flour


325 g Cool Water


-Mix all ingredients, place in a bowl or plastic container, cover and refrigerate for 24hrs.


Day 2


650g Soaker from Day 1


175g AP


100g Firm Sourdough Starter


25g Cool Water


10g Kosher Salt


1/2 tsp Active Dry Yeast


-Mix all ingredients in large bowl, cover and let rest (autolyse) for 20-30 minutes.


-Knead 50 strokes in bowl, cover and rest for 1 hr.


-Turn dough on lightly floured surface, return to bowl, cover and let ferment for 2 hrs.


-Divide into 3 equal pieces, preshape into loose ovals, cover and let rest for 15 minutes.


-Place baking stone on 2nd rack from top, arrange steam pan with lava rocks under stone, off to side, and preheat oven to 500F with convection.


-Shape baguettes by rolling and stretching them gently until they are betwen 15-16" long.


-Proof for 45 minutes on linen couche.


-To bake, place them on peel, slash using lame or sharp razor/knife, place in oven directly on stone.  Add 1 cup of water to steam pan, close oven door, bake for 10 minutes at 460F with convection.  Rotate and bake for another 18 minutes without convection, or until internal temp registers 210F.  Cool for at least 30 minutes before eating...


Notes: I should have baked them at 480F and then at 460F after rotating.


Enjoy!


Tim


 

LA Baker's picture

My first baguettes - DL's Parisian Daily Bread

February 6, 2010 - 5:37pm -- LA Baker

I made my first Baguettes today!!  They were SOOOO tasty!  I made the Parisian Daily Bread, used Organic APF, SAF Instant Yeast and Sea Salt.  No changes to the recipe and it turned out great.  Here are my comments:


First, it rose really fast!  Doubled during the first fermentation (when it was only supposed to rise about 25%) and then doubled again after my turn. 

mcs's picture
mcs

I guess that's what I'd call a pizza made with 75% hydration baguette dough.  MMMMmmmmmmm!  Tomato sauce covered with seasoned chicken, marinated artichoke hearts, mozzarella and parm.  Next time you make baguettes, do yourself a favor and reserve some dough for dinner.  Tomorrow night will be calzones.



-Mark


http://TheBackHomeBakery.com

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hi All,


Here's some more catch-up blogging.  The top 2 are basically fat baguettes.  The bottom 2 are my made up version of bauernbrot with breadcrumbs.  Enjoy!


Tim





jombay's picture
jombay

I really enjoyed the loaves I made last time so I made a few more this weekend. These ones had a bulk fermentation time of about 40 hours. I'm really enjoying this new whole wheat starter. Has great flavour, crazy active and only a couple weeks old.


Shape, no grigne but still very good looking loaves.



Crumb


emilyaziegler's picture
emilyaziegler

The original post can be found on my blog: http://www.foodbuzz.com/recipes/1765649-homemade-baguettes-and-rolls-


Tuesday, January 12, 2010
Homemade Baguettes and Rolls!!!
This was my first attempt at making homemade bread and I was absolutely TICKLED with the results. This dough was so easy to manipulate and tasted so good after it was finished baking. I recommend this to anyone and everyone. It is so simple. I know that working with yeast can be intimidating, but I promise you it's not. I am a complete novice in this realm of baking. Trust me. Use the boule dough recipe I have recently posted to make baguettes, rolls, or any shaped bread your heart desires! I promise you will not be disappointed. I couldn't keep enough of this bread on the table. It was eaten up so quickly! It remains soft for quite some time, unlike what is purchased in a store. DO IT. DO IT NOW. MAKE THIS BREAD. :o)



Homemade Baguettes
Courtesy: Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day


1. Use a grapefruit sized amount of Boule Dough.


2. Here are the instructions, verbatim, from the cookbook: "The gluten cloak: don't knead, just "cloak" and shape a loaf in 30 to 60 seconds. First, prepare a pizza peel by sprinkling it liberally with cornmeal (or whatever your recipe calls for) to prevent your loaf from sticking to it when you slide it into the oven. Sprinkle the surface of your refrigerated dough with flour.


3. "Pull up and cut off a 1-pound (grapefruit-size) piece of dough, using a serrated knife. Hold the mass of dough in your hands and add a little more flour as needed so it won't stick to your hands.


4. "Gently stretch the surface of the dough around to the bottom on all four sides, rotating the ball a quarter-turn as you go. Most of the dusting flour will fall off; it's not intended to be incorporated into the dough. The bottom of the loaf may appear to be a collection of bunched ends, but it will flatten out and adhere during resting and baking. The correctly shaped final product will be smooth and cohesive. The entire process should take no more than 30 to 60 seconds."



[SIDENOTE: Okay, so I didn't have a pizza peel (it is on my list of things to get by the time I'm married), but you can make it work- either transfer the dough VERY CAREFULLY onto your baking stone by hand or slide it on by using a cornmeal covered cookie sheet.]


5. Work the dough so that it is cylinder shaped, approximately two inches in diameter. Make sure your work space is well floured. Once the dough is the correct shape and size, allow it to sit for 25 minutes. At this time, preheat your oven to 450 degrees F.


6. Place a baking stone and empty broiler tray into the oven AS IT IS PREHEATING. Put the baking stone in the middle of the oven, and place the broiler pan below it, on another rack.


7. Once the dough is finished 'sitting,' use a pastry brush and brush water onto the top of it, so that you can cut diagonal slits on the top of the dough using a serrated knife (I found this a touch difficult to do, but try your best).


8. Once the oven is ready to go, CAREFULLY put the dough onto the baking stone. Right after you put the dough onto the baking stone, put a cup of warm water into the broiler tray so that it steams. Quickly shut the door so that the steam stays inside of the oven.


9. Bake the bread for 25 minutes, or until it is golden brown and firm to the touch. Once it is finished baking, place it on a rack to cool. Once it is cool, it is ready to slice and enjoy!


 



Homemade Rolls!
Also courtesy: Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day


 


The next day, I had enough dough left over to make individual rolls for lunch! There are minor differences to the recipe above.


The dough only needs to be shaped in a ball. It must sit on a cornmealed surface again (either a pizza peel or cookie sheet) for 30 minutes. Place whole wheat flour on top of the dough as it sits. Use the serrated knife again to make the slits (the difference with the baguettes in this section of the recipe is that traditional baguettes do not have flour on top of the bread, so water is used instead). Preheat the oven to 450 degrees again with the baking stone and broiler tray in the same places as noted for the baguette recipe above. Bake for 30 minutes, or until golden brown and firm to the touch.



Enjoy!! It is truly delicious!!!!


 


 

jombay's picture
jombay

Had another go at Bouabsa baguettes. I probably could have kept them in for another minute but I decided I would try a lighter crust today. These only had about a 12h bulk ferment.


Shape


BB1


Crumb


BB2

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