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Summer Herb sourdough rye

May 15, 2006 - 1:00pm -- Joe Fisher

Here's a nice pair of loaves from Bread Alone. It's made from a 100% rye starter. It includes all the fresh herbs I had in my fridge (tarragon and thyme) and 4 cloves of garlic.

I wanted to make the dough in the evening, shape it, and retard it in the fridge overnight. I got a bit of a late start, and the dough had almost-but-not-quite doubled in its first ferment by 1am. I had to be baking it by 7am, meaning it'd have to be out of the fridge and warming up by about 6am (which is when I got up to heat the oven). So I didn't think it'd have enough time to get a good rise in the fridge.

rmk129's picture
rmk129

Okay, now I am trying to figure out how to post photos without having them appear in the Gallery :)
I just discovered "Flickr", so I will try to post a link to my site to show my first attempt at Floydm's Pain Sur Poolish". I ended up adding 1 1/2 extra cups of flour, but next time I will try to follow his advice and keep the dough as wet as I can handle :)

Both loaves. I have a tiny oven so I can only bake one loaf at a time.

Crumb of the first loaf. At least I think that is what you call a "crumb", judging from other people's descriptions on this site?

Crumb of the second loaf.

The very pale loaf was the first loaf I baked. I did not use a wash or glaze, although I sprayed the outside of the loaf lightly with warm water before putting it in the oven...I read somewhere that was a good way to create more steam (I also always have a small pan in the bottom of my stove and I throw a cup of water into it to produce steam just as I put the loaf in the preheated oven). Now I am not so sure about the loaf-misting idea because maybe it is responsible for the pock-like marks on the crust of this loaf??? I think I also had issues with the oven heat for this loaf--I have a gas oven with no temperature indicators at all. I baked it for 40 minutes and it was still that pale!!!

The darker loaf was the second loaf. I put it in the fridge while the first loaf was baking, then I used an egg white wash spread on with my fingers...maybe I deflated the loaf a bit too much this way and this is why the shape is like a perfect semi-circle??? I made sure the oven was very hot this time (the flames sounded very loud), and it only took 25 minutes to bake even though I turned it down to "halfway" (whatever temperature that might be) after 15 minutes.

My major trouble is definitely telling when the loaves are done. I did the hollow-sounding test, and they both seemed done, but when I cut them open an hour later they both seemed a little too moist in the center for my liking...or am I being too impatient cutting them open so soon? I should probably invest in an oven thermometer to test the loaf temperatures...

I would be happy to receive *any* suggestions, criticisms, and/or comments about my loaves and/or best methods for posting photos. I am really looking forward to learning from the members on this site!!!

precipice's picture

San Francisco Baking Institutue - experiences?

May 8, 2006 - 4:14pm -- precipice
Forums: 

Has anyone taken one of the 5-day workshops at the San Francisco Baking Institute? I was thinking of taking their "Artisan I" class and wasn't sure whether it was worth it. Any advice appreciated (including Bay Area alternatives that may be better).

http://www.sfbi.com/workshop_artisan1.html

Thanks!

-p

longlivegoku's picture
longlivegoku

Well this is my 2nd attempt at Jeffrey Hamelman's whole-wheat bread. The first turned out pretty well so my wife requested more (the best toast ever according to her). I started the pre-ferment the morning before work, mixed up the dough after work and then fermented/proofed. Unfortunately time was my enemy as I was unable to allow a full final proof. As a result I had some out of control oven spring action I think. No matter, tasted better this time than last! (different flour)

Bread image

Joe Fisher's picture

Sourdough pecan craisin bread! Pix

May 7, 2006 - 4:00pm -- Joe Fisher

Recipe from Bread Alone. The recipe calls for dried cherries, but I had craisins on hand.

Yes, the crumb is purple :) That's from the reserved liquid used to soak the fruit. The crust is awesome! I think all of the sugar from the craisin juice caused it to caramelize nicely.

There's 2 cups of craisins/pecans, and just a little over 2 cups of flour. It's basically fruit and nuts loosely bound together with bread :) Kneading was definately interesting. Every addition of fruit and nuts changed the moisture content of the bread. Good practice for getting a "feel" for dough.

Anyway, here's the pix. Enjoy!

Joe Fisher's picture

For those who asked about my techniques - pix and commentary

April 30, 2006 - 2:30pm -- Joe Fisher

Hey all! Some folks were asking me about my shaping and baking techniques, so here they are.

We're making 2 recipes. Sourdough Rye from Bread Alone, and Basic Sourdough Bread from The Bread Baker's Apprentice. The rye is made from my 100% rye starter named Clyde, the other from a white starter named Gertie, which was seeded with a bit of Clyde's leftover.

I've already made the rye dough, and it's gone through its first ferment. My hand is in the picture for scale.

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