The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Slowrise's picture

Nashoba Brook Bakery in Concord, MA

March 24, 2010 - 4:58pm -- Slowrise

Nashoba Brook Bakery, located in West Concord, MA, is a fabulous bakery specializing in sourdough-based artisan breads. The company produces thousands of loaves of bread a day in a massive French press oven, visible to cafe customers through large glass windows that encase the bread room. 

Daisy_A's picture

Hello from another newcomer

March 19, 2010 - 5:53am -- Daisy_A

Hello to all on this website and many thanks for your support of new bakers.


I am a home baker living in the UK. I came to this site via a search on sourdough starters so made a few posts before I realised there was an introduction board. I have to say I have received good support already, particularly with respect to nurturing my starter.

cavali's picture
cavali

This is my Caprese Boule, I most say I am very happy with the result, its my wettest dough so far, hardest to deal with (I am a newby after all) but the best bread so far. Super crunchy crust. nice aromatic crum.


Ingredients:


2 cups of Bread Flour


2/3 cup of all purpouse


1/3 cup of white cornmeal


1 1/4 tsp of yeast


1 cup of water 90F


1/4 cup of tomato sauce


3/8 cup of basil (crushed dried)


2 Tbsp cream cheese


1 1/2 tsp Salt


1 Tbsp sugar


 


- Mixed all 3 cups of flour with salt on your usual bowl. 


- prepare the yeast with 1/4 cup of water @  90F add the sugar (wait 10 min)


- create an opening in the middle of the flour


- Mix the yeast with the rest of the water and the basil


- get the liquid mix in the flour opening


- mix all together with a wooden spoon


- Let autolyce for 20 min.


- Fold (or try to, its very very wet) for some 20 min


- 1st rise for 90 min


- fold for 15 to 20 more min


- 2nd rise for 60 min on flat surface covered with the bowl.


- punch and fold, form and place on top of your  (covered with cornmeal)sheet


- sprinkle all purpouse flour on top of the Boule (this i just learn on a video, i was really frustrated with the clean look of my bread tops, i wanted the white rustic finish you get from a baker, this trick does it).


- rest for 30 min


- oven @ 500 1 cup of hot water at the bottom pan


- place bread in. 5 min lower temp to 400


20 min latter lower temp to 350


cook till internal temp is 200.


 


Enjoy


 


 

saraugie's picture
saraugie

Which one book, has the most, the tastiest recipes ?  Instructions on bread baking 101 not necessary, if it has that's ok but not essential by any means.

gonzalezbrazil's picture
gonzalezbrazil

I´m here back now in this my first post of 2010.


 


I´m an artisan bread baker from Petrópolis, Brazil, where i started baking breads to survive. I have had a pet-shop at my city for 23 long years , but i´d losted my business on a riverflood at 2003, January. The waters invaded my pet-shop and destroyed all. Then, with lots of bills to pay, lots of unsolved payments i declared me on bankrupt. The next years were so hard times and for many following days i had no money to buy breads on bakery. Then i decided to study recipes of breads and study how to bake my own bread at home. I found a new recipe of that famous Jim Lahey´s no-knead method and started to bake that breads first to my own, but then i decided to sell them to neighbors, parents, and friends. Parallel i´d started to reasearch lots of new breads from all the world´s corners. Now, after one and 8 months after that challenge, i have my own small bakery where i produce a variety of 170 breads, cakes and buttered biscuits. I had my history narrated at one of best reportage Tv show in Brazil from local Globo Network Tv. My history you could view in this video but the language is our local portuguese:


http://g1.globo.com/globoreporter/0,,MUL1052006-16619,00-COMERCIANTE+REVELA+RECEITA+PARA+SUSTENTAR+A+FAMILIA.html


And here you could view my flaxseed bread step-by-step recipe of that Jim Lahey´s bread version, but still in portuguese language:


http://g1.globo.com/globoreporter/0,,MUL1052070-16619,00-VEJA+COMO+PREPARAR+O+PAO+INTEGRAL+DE+TRIGO+COM+LINHACA.html


  I hope you enjoy it.


After those months of many reasearchers i baked lots of ethnic breads and Challah Bread is one of my favorites.


In my city, of Germanic colonization, i´ve been contacted on last June to bake breads at a local Germanic Festival called Bauernfest. And i created an original bread for that event, that folks loved a lot. With the Challah dough, i baked a bread filled with honey brushed on top, sliced rippened bananas, walnuts and golden raisins, sprinkled with grounded cinamon. When i finished, i´d folded that bread similar like Germanic Strudel. It turns AMAZING. The people at festival looked to that loaves and asked me imediatly: Is it a Strudel??? Then i decided name that bread as Jewish Strudel.


Then it was a ´must` after that occasion. Always baking Jewish Strudel i become famous among locals and i decided to begin the 2010´s post productions here sharing with you this bread i think you´ll love a lot!


 


Here the recipe:


You could begin making the dough of KAF blog´s recipe for Challah you get here:


http://www.kingarthurflour.com/blog/2009/01/05/challa-lujah/


Then, do the following path:


Rest the  original dough of Challah to double size for one hour, then deflate it and rolling it in a great rectangle shaped dough. Brush the surface of dough with honey, sprinkle clover and cinnamon all over the dough, then sliced sliced rippened bananas or apples, golden or sultan raisins and a lot of chopped walnuts. Then fold the dough in a third then another folding in last third, just like an envelope sealed. Sprinkle an amount of wheat all purpose flour and cinnamon clove mixture at top and bake exactly like you done with Challah.


 


This bread turns excellent, with astonishing aromas and softly sweetened dough. You could variate the fruits you choose for filling it with a diferent assortment like figs, black prunes, apricots, combining them with those correspondent jams to brush on surface. It´s amazing when sliced the bread with fresh heavy cream on top.


 


For your mouthwatering P.J.Hamel promised me to publish a recipe and picture of this marvellous Strudel...a Jewish Strude for next posts at KAF blog!

Nica Linda's picture

Baking bread in the Tropics?

April 23, 2009 - 1:13pm -- Nica Linda

Hello Bakers,

Over the past year I have discovered that I love to bake bread, and not just because I have been baking out of necessity (sadly, good bread is hard to find where I live). Without the convenience of internet right in my kitchen, my single resource has been the "Fannie Farmer Cook Book" published in 1970 that a friend gave me. But as of a month ago, we finally have dial-up speed internet out here in the campo. One of my first searches lead me to The Fresh Loaf!

madzilla's picture
madzilla

So I have been learning to bake bread.  I did NOT buy a bread machine, which I did consider for a while.  I was thinking about what would be easy, simple, less time consuming.  But when it came down to it, I just didn't like the constraints of a bread machine.  The loaf pans are so small, sometimes square, and the whole paddle thing just leaves me cold.  I had a bread machine when I lived in Germany.  I used it and hated it. It dumbed me down and I never understood the whole process of bread baking.  This made it impossible to troubleshoot or use anything other than the basic settings. 


Now, without a bread machine, I am so happy.  I feel like I have found a new hobby [that hopefully won't make me TOO fat!] and it is very exciting to create such wonderful works of edible art.  The breads that I have made so far, that have been successful, are a half-white, half-wheat loaf that is very nice, and would be great for sandwiches, cinnamon toast, and just about anything else.  The other loaf I have made that needs a bit of work is the artisan bread.  I have managed to get the right size, rise, and color...but need to work on the scoring and taste. 


Next I will try making a huge starter in the fridge and flavor it with some sourdough starter I already have.  Another really interesting thing I am doing, is using the bread mixes I am getting delivered.  Hodgson Mills makes some great mixes, but I don't use them as is.  I use them as additives to my breads for more flavor and the dough conditioning properties.  I could buy dough conditioner, but this is much more fun to experiment!


I also am working with gluten, and this addition is particularly helpful up here in the mountains.  I am at almost 8000 feet, so the high altitude is also a challenge.  But I am figuring it out as I go.


Thats it for now. Will post my recipes soon.

madzilla's picture

My second Artisan Loaf

March 18, 2009 - 9:28am -- madzilla

Ok, so the first loaf was horrible.  I baked it on a stone, and it didn't brown. I basically didn't bake it long enough.  Here is a picture of my second attempt.  I baked it in my Cuisinart 2 quart saucepan with lid, sprinkled with a bit of cornmeal, at 500 degrees [30 min. lid on, 20 min. lid off]. It turned out very nice and was a great texture. However, I felt it was a bit bland and will add some sourdough starter next time. I also need to work on the scoring I think.  It was very crusty and I like that, but not very pretty, I guess. Need to keep practicing!

groverman85c's picture

Baking in Beijing, dry bread, please help!

February 10, 2009 - 7:02pm -- groverman85c

Hello,


 


I have started a bakery in China producing a local type of quick bread. the recipe is below


 


50 eggs


25kg flour


2.5 ltrs oil


4 kg sugar


 


we use a sour dough starter that was given to us by a company producing the same type of bread. we combine the ingridients and the prepared sourdough starter and then add luke warm water to mix them in an industrial mixer. we mix for about 1 min and the dough comes out relatively dry, not sticky at all.

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