The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

artisan bread

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

You can go nuts trying to find the perfect pizza dough formula. The cookbooks and the web are full of recipes for various types of dough and full of opinions regarding the type of flour to use, the ingredients (beyond flour, water, salt and yeast) and the mixing and fermentation methods that work best.

My goal for today was what I understand to be classic pizza napoletana. The dough should consist of the four basic ingredients only – no oil, sugar, malt or other stuff. The crust should be very thin and crisp on the bottom, not soft or soggy. The toppings should be minimal, so the crust is the main attraction.

After reading through many, many recipes, I settled on the one in Maggie Glezer's “Artisan Breads.” It uses the 4 ingredients only. It is for a Naples-style pizza. It is credited to Emanuele Leonforte of Hosteria restaurant in Port Chester, New York.

Leonforte uses a mix of Doppio Zero and high-gluten flour that Glezer calculates as resulting in about 12.5% protein. He uses a remarkably short mix. He ferments the dough for a long time but only once. Glezer gives the option of retarding the dough overnight and fermenting it the next day, and that fit best with my schedule. The method I used is described below.

 

Ingredients

Wt.

Baker's %

KAF Bread Flour

500 g

100

Instant yeast

1/4 tsp

0.2

Salt

10 g

2

Water, lukewarm

330

66

 

Method

  1. Measure the flour, yeast and salt into the bowl of a stand mixer and mix them.

  2. With the dough hook in place and the mixer at slow speed, gradually pour in the water.

  3. Mix until the dough forms a ball and cleans the side of the bowl, about 3 minutes.

  4. Cover the bowl and let the dough rest for 10-15 minutes.

  5. Mix the dough at Speed 2 for about 3 minutes. It should be fairly smooth but will not pass the window pane test.

  6. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured board and divide it into 4 equal pieces of about 200 g each (to make 10 inch pizzas).

  7. Shape each piece into a tight ball.

  8. Place each ball into a 1 qt Ziploc bag with a tablespoon of olive oil. Roll the ball in the oil and seal the bags.

  9. The dough can be refrigerated overnight, frozen for later use or allowed to ferment at room temperature for 5 to 6 hours for use the same day. (I refrigerated two balls and froze two.)

  10. For refrigerated dough, remove it to room temperature 3-5 hours before you plan on making the pizza, depending on room temperature.

  11. An hour before baking, pre-heat the oven to 500ºF (or more, if possible) with a baking stone on the middle shelf.

  12. Remove one ball at a time from its bag and shape into a 10 inch round by your method of choice.

  13. Top the pizza as desired, immediately transfer it to the baking stone, and bake for 8-10 minutes until done. Repeat for additional pizzas.

The toppings I used for each pizza were:

  1. Brush the entire surface of the shaped pizza dough with olive oil.

  2. Sprinkle with a tablespoon of finely chopped fresh rosemary.

  3. Sprinkle with a large clove of garlic, sliced very thin.

  4. Distribute on the pizza a cup of cherry tomatoes, halved, cut side up or a cup of fresh roma tomatoes peeled, seeded and cut into quarters.

  5. After baking, optionally top with fresh arugula or basel leaves.

 

Pizza with Cherry Tomatoes, pre-bake

Pizza with Cherry Tomatoes, baked

Pizza with Roma Tomatoes, pre-bake

Pizza with Roma Tomatoes, baked

The results were wonderful! The dough stretched easily to paper thin without tearing and baked so crisp there was no sagging when a slice was help up by the corona. Biting into it was a noisy crunch. The flavor of the crust was delicious. The whole experience sold me on minimalist toppings.

Pizza bottom crust

Thin crust

Crust

I don't think adding a few capers, or olives or mushrooms would do any harm, but I don't think making pizzas with heavy saucing, lots of cheese or lots of anything will be tempting again.

 The pizza was a nice follow-up to last night's bruschetta.

Bruschetta with fresh funghi porcini and with tomatoes and basel

David

Submitted to YeastSpotting

Ryan Sandler's picture

Major events in the "Bread Revolution"?

March 10, 2011 - 12:12pm -- Ryan Sandler

I'll start with my question, to pique your interests, and then explain why I'm asking:


The Question: What, would you say, are the major events of the "bread revolution" of the last 20-30 years?  By this I mean events which stimulated a great deal of interest in either buying or making at home high quality bread (or both).  For instance, the publication of the Bread Baker's Apprentice, or Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day are recent events that might qualify, although I don't know what the real magnitude of those are.

bfb's picture

oven range purchase recommendation

January 14, 2011 - 9:12am -- bfb

Hello,


I'm looking for a white freestanding range with convection oven. I currently own a Frigidaire range which has been in my townhouse, but temperature knobs start being loose and I can't control the temperature anymore, very annoying. 


I love cooking and have participated in farmers market to sell my Asian artisan breads, so oven is very important. My friend recommended me Viking, Wolf, or Jenn Air though they are too expensive for me. My budget would be less than 1K. 

dcsuhocki's picture
dcsuhocki

Polish bread is absolutely amazing!  Hundreds of ryes, rolls, street breads; the list is endless.  I will try to get some more pictures, but here's a start:


Link to some of my pictures of authentic Polish bread:


http://www.associatedcontent.com/slideshow/54352/polish_bread.html?cat=22


 

nicolesue's picture

Open vs. Close Crumb

May 25, 2010 - 9:15pm -- nicolesue

Hi,

I've made the 'lean dough' recipe from PR's ABED a couple of times. Most of the time, dough often comes out with large open crumbs, except for a loaf I made yesterday. Instead of the usual, the crumbs were close, more like regular bread loaf. Taste wise, the bread was thoroughly cook with no gummy texture at all. All in all, still very good to eat.

May I know what causes the crumbs to open and not? I've been using the same recipe each time. I'm just curious, and would like a better understanding, to help me control the outcome of the bread better next time.

thehsmomof3's picture

Whole Wheat/ Whole Grain French Bread, Ciabatta, or similar bread

May 1, 2010 - 3:18pm -- thehsmomof3
Forums: 

I have been making 100% whole wheat bread (both with hard red and hard white wheat) for quite some time.  My family loves the loaves, and I love the ease of baking using my Bosch Universal.  (I have rheumatoid arthritis, and I'm unable to knead by hand.)  However, I want to branch out into French bread, Ciabatta, artisan bread or something smiilar.  Has anyone successfully made this type of bread 100% whole grain using a Bosch or similar machine?  Please share your recipes.  I would be most grateful.  Thank you, Sherri

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