The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

100% whole wheat bread

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

 

I am continuing my exploration of fresh-ground flour this week with another bake of Peter Reinhart's “100% Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread” from Whole Grain Baking. I baked this bread three weeks ago and found the flavor marvelous, but the crumb was somewhat dense and cakey. I had ground the flour from hard red Winter wheat at the second from the finest setting. I did like the chewiness from the coarser ground grains. So, looking for a lighter loaf overall but maintaining the chewiness, I modified the formula and procedures somewhat.

Reinhart's formula calls for half the flour in a soaker of flour, milk product and salt. For the liquid, I used ¾ non-fat Greek-style yoghurt and ¼ water. The rest of the flour is in a biga made with flour, water and instant yeast. The biga is mixed, kneaded and refrigerated overnight.

I ground the wheat for the biga at the finest setting of my KitchenAid Grain Mill. This resulted in flour that was still a bit coarser than KAF WW flour, for example. I ground the wheat for the soaker at a medium-coarse setting.

I thought that I could get a lighter crumb and higher rising loaf if I developed the gluten in the biga portion before adding the soaker to the mix. So, I added all the other ingredients (salt, yeast, honey and canola oil) to the biga in the mixer bowl. I mixed for a couple minutes with the paddle at Speed 1, then with the dough hook for 11 minutes at Speed 2. The dough was rather sticky, but it cleaned the sides of the bowl, almost cleaned the bottom and had window paning. I then added in the soaker, which was quite crumbly, and mixed with the dough hook until it was incorporated into the dough.

After a 5 minute rest, I briefly kneaded the dough on the board, incorporating another couple tablespoons of fine ground whole wheat in the process, then transferred the dough to an oiled batter pitcher for bulk fermentation. Fermentation, proofing and baking were according to Reinhart's instructions. Note that, three weeks ago, I baked this bread in a Le Creuset oval Dutch oven. Today, I baked on a baking stone and steamed the oven using the SFBI method I've described in earlier postings.

The crust was crunchy, especially from the coarser pieces of wheat. The crumb reminds me of a 100% rye with rye chops. It's not what I was aiming for, but it is interesting. The crumb has two distinct textures from the different grinds of grain - tender and chewy-crunchy. The flavor is delicious.

I'd count this a worthwhile learning experience, but it's still not my ideal crumb for this bread. 

The other bread that I baked today was my San Joaquin Sourdough. I fed the levain with a 50/50 mix of KAF Sir Galahad and fresh-ground whole wheat. The final dough had 5% fresh-ground rye.

San Joaquin Sourdough breads with Julia Drayton Camelias

San Joaquin Sourdough Crumb

David

 

idiotbaker's picture
idiotbaker

 

(Guest Post by Smokestack)
DOUGH NIGHT: As over clean dinner plates, around 8pm, Idiotbaker and I decided: it was time. Mrs. Idiotbaker and children fled the scene to make room for the culinary chaos about to ensue. Soon the wondermill was lighting up its fine-flour afterburner under Idiotbaker's impatient gaze, while I poured over the five-foot long schedule, wondering how we were going to pull all this off. 
We started with the Panettone. Peter Reinhart's recipe times sixteen. The test loaf turned out alright. We decided to incorporate more white wheat into the flour mix. No time to test again, so we're in uncharted territory as far as flour blend goes. 
One thing to remember when using a 20qt Hobart with a broken low-speed: hand-mix first. After the cloud of flour (raining butter) settled, the damage seemed negligible. The dough looked great after some Hobart TLC.
While Idiotbaker was tweaking the dough, I was doing the hard work: tasting booze/fruit mixtures for each of our four planned panettone batches. Fruits used: cranberry, cherry, currant, mango. Booze: Bacardi, Triple Sec. A couple of the batches had some OJ in there too. 
Also on the docket for the evening was prepping dough for 8 loves of Hutzelbrot. Using a mash is new to both of us. [IB- I messed up and added the altus to the mash as it went into the oven. :( .] No test batch for the Hutzelbrot. This should interesting to watch develop tomorrow afternoon. 
For now, all the dough balls are resting in bags and bowls covering the dining room table; waiting for morning when we fire up the oven. Until then, I'm going to grab a few hours shut-eye. 

 

curvesarein's picture
curvesarein

Well I decided to do something good for our health. Something I did 25 years ago and before when my young family was growing. I used to grind my own wheat and make my own bread from whole wheat grain. Everything we ate was fresh and full of nutrition and fiber. Then I married the Italian (half Irish too) and he wanted white bread or Irish soda bread etc. Not gonna touch the brown stuff. So I sold all my equipment to buy a stove! Big mistake. But seemed the thing to do at the time. Make the hubby happy! I wanted a new stove too! So now 25 years later I made a new investment in our health and bought a new model Bosch Universal Plus mixer with 800 watts of power and the ability to knead 4 loaves of bread in 10 minutes. Then I was on the search for the recipe from 30 years ago! Happy I found the website The Fresh Loaf and Old Wooden Spoon gave me the recipe I used back then ( that gave away our age right away!) My first day in the kitchen was like  the I Love Lucy show. Now I don't like to be on camera but this would have won me enough money to pay for my equipment for sure! Did I say it was an investment, not just a purchase.   Here is what I purchased after much research and past experience.     Nutrimill Grain Mill Nutri Mill Grainmill Flour Grinder   Now the first day was quite interesting, all seemed easy enough so I skimmed the directions on the equipment. I set up the Nutrimill to grind my wheat. Obviously I didn't have it quite locked in right as flour started shooting out the side, but one quick stop and we got that under control. Not too much mess to clean up. Then on to proofing the yeast. A little honey, warm water and yeast. It starts to bubble so I know it's working. Yay! Next is to start filling the mixer with water, flour, salt and honey, then I turn to find the yeast. It is starting to bubble forth like champagne out of the cup ! So I add that and proceed to add more flour until the dough pulls away from the side of the bowl. (that's how you tell it's ready)    Now my first mixer had 2 speeds, this has 4. I think I must have put it on speed 3. Somewhere someone said I should remove the outer rim of the bowl at this stage.     Now I never did that with the old one. But I figured why not, so removed it.    Then turned my back on the machine and went to the sink. I turned around and dough was breaking off and flying around my kitchen, I kid you not! Splat in the dining room, splat on the counter, splat on the kitchen floor. I put that rim on as fast as I could blink an eye. All went well after that and we got some beautiful tasty bread. Next baking day went smoothly with great results, (cinnamon bread) everyone wants to buy it. Not happening, that executive decision was made the first day. I'm not 25 anymore! I used to make 15 loaves a day, babysit and deliver the bread. $1.50 a loaf in the 80's. Now today was my 3rd day baking. I had to grind 20 lbs of wheat into flour that I sold for $4.00 for each 5 lbs. That took a while. Then I had some left over and decided to start a second batch of four loaves of bread. Needed to grind more flour.    Rule # 2 , don't overfill the hopper or turn your back on it. I'm always trying to multi-task. I turned around and the stove side of my kitchen looked like the first snow of winter!    I'm having to learn lots of patience with this new process, but the rewards are warm soft whole wheat loaves of bread. Guess what the Italian is eating willingly now? At lunch he waited for me to slice bread to make his sandwich. The little white rolls nearby were crying! The pictures tell the rest! I hear there really is an episode of I love Lucy baking bread! Gotta get that one from Netflix. Linda McErlean http://picasaweb.google.com/curvesarein/BreadBaking?authkey=Gv1sRgCMK-v5atusP07gE&feat=directlink   "Until one has loved an animal, part of their soul remains un-awakened."    

curvesarein's picture

Wanted: Original Bosch WW Bread recipe in the 80's. The one the demonstrators made.

November 9, 2010 - 4:21pm -- curvesarein
Forums: 

Ok, what excitement today!!! My Bosch Universal Plus mixer and food processor showed up and my Nutrimill and Bread Slicer. I spent all day super cleaning and organizing for my equipment. I am so glad I have lot's of room in my kitchen and pantry. The Nutrimill is large. Ok now I want to make the original recipe I made 30 years ago with the Bosc Machine then with 2 speeds. Does anyone have that recipe?

Mebake's picture
Mebake

This is another bake from "Whole grain breads" of P.Reinhart. It is Whole Wheat Hearth bread.

It is 100% WholeWheat.  70% of WW flour was from a sack of Indian Chakki atta (stone ground flour). I suppose Chakki atta is 96% extraction. Remaining flour was milled from red winter italian wheat, sifted. Therefore, i suppose that this is not entirely 100% ww, but close.

I used 1.5tsp veg. oil instead of butter, and 1.5tsp honey. The crust was chewy, and the crumb was somewhat moist but not dense. THe bread had a sweet wheaty aroma, and the taste was superb. It was indeed one of my best WW breads i have made.

I will definitely make this bread again.

 

Smita's picture
Smita

Easily the best non-sourdough loaf I have ever made. Followed instructions to the letter.

What surprised me the most was how incredibly light the loaf was. Very good for morning toast. Best within 3-4 days. Thank you Peter Reinhart and BBA!

 

Earlybirdsf's picture

Stone Ground Flour 12.3% Protein- Ideas or recipes?

March 1, 2010 - 1:07pm -- Earlybirdsf
Forums: 

I just discovered a local farmer, selling stone ground, hard red winter wheat, with 12.3% protein. I am looking for some good recipes, that I could use with this flour. I am not as accomplished as most of the amazing contributers to this site. Not yet, anyway.  I have already made a few loafs, using a 50/50 mix of stone ground flour, with AP, and used the "no knead" method, in last weeks NYTimes. It came out good, but I want better. I like both rounds, and loafs.

Thank you for the help.

Earl

San Francisco

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