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Sourdough Semolina Bread

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zolablue's picture
zolablue

Sourdough Semolina Bread

I just posted the Semolina Sandwich Loaf ( http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4213/semolina-sandwich-loaf ) and wanted to share my experience making this sourdough version of Maggie Glezer’s.

This was really a nice little loaf with a great crust and also a very moist and beautiful crumb. It surprised me with the nice oven spring it had for such a seemingly small loaf.

The crumb has a beautiful yellow cast as well but the recipe uses AP flour in addition to the semolina (durum patent flour) so it was not as intensely yellow as the sandwich loaf which was 100% semolina flour.

I only proofed these loaves for 4 hours, rather than the 5 estimated by Glezer but I generally have a fast starter or it could have been the room temp that day. They were not large loaves and I goofed and preheated my oven to about 550 as I normally do but would not repeat that. I ended up baking them about 40 minutes but I did cover them at the end to keep them from getting even darker. Preheating the oven to the correct temp for this type of loaf would be much better.

I have to say again, this bread was wonderful. My neighbor who got the other loaf just loved it. I baked this bread the same day (last weekend) as the semolina sandwich loaf and it is still extremely moist. It was delicious last night used to sop up sauce from eggplant parmesan served with juicy grilled chicken (yum!).

This was, again, what I felt was a straight forward and rather easy recipe. Most of the time you spend is waiting but it was really fun to mix up and so easy to make into little loaves. I loved it and it you try it I hope you like it, too.

More photos here:

http://zolablue.smugmug.com/gallery/3506188#197819612

Sourdough Semolina Bread – Maggie Glezer, A Blessing of Bread

Skill Level: Expert

Time: About 20 hours (about 8 1/2 hours on baking day)

Makes: Two 1-pound (450 gram) breads

Recipe Synopsis: Make a sourdough starter and let it ferment overnight for 8 to 12 hours. The next day, mix the dough and let it ferment for 2 hours. Shape the dough and let it proof for 5 hours. Bake the breads for about 45 minutes.

For sourdough starter:

2 tablespoons (30 grams/1.1 ounces) very active, fully fermented firm sourdough starter, refreshed 8 to 12 hours earlier

1/3 cup (80 grams/2.8 ounces) warm water

About 1 cup (135 grams/4.8 ounces) unbleached AP flour

For final dough:

1 1/3 cups (225 grams/7.9 ounces) fine semolina flour

1 2/3 cups (225 grams/7.9 ounces) unbleached AP flour

1 1/3 cups (300 grams/10.6 ounces) warm water

2 1/4 teaspoons (11 grams/0.4 ounce) table salt

1 tablespoon (18 grams/0.6 ounce) mild honey or 1 tablespoon plus 1 1/2 teaspoons (21 grams/0.8 ounce) granulated sugar

Fully fermented starter

EVENING BEFORE BAKING

Mixing the sourdough starter: Rub starter into water until it is partially dissolved, then stir in the flour. Knead this firm dough until it is smooth. Remove 2/3 cup (135 grams/4.8 ounces) of the starter and place it in a sealed container at least four times its volume, to use in the final dough. (Place the remaining starter in a sealed container and refrigerate to use in the next bake.) Let the starter ferment until it has tripled in volume and is just starting to deflate, 8 to 12 hours.

BAKING DAY

Mixing the autolyze: In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine the semolina and AP flour. With the paddle attachment on low speed, stir in the warm water until well combined. The dough will look very granular and wet. Let the dough rest covered for 20 minutes.

Mixing the dough: Add the salt, honey or sugar, and starter to the dough and mix on medium speed with the dough hook for about 10 minutes, or until the dough cleans the sides of the bowl and becomes very extensible. If you did not weigh your flour to measure it, be prepared to adjust the consistency of the dough. The consistency will also be profoundly influenced by the degree to which the semolina was milled and its freshness. Add at least a tablespoon or two of water if the dough is very firm, or at least a tablespoon or two of flour if the dough is impossibly sticky and does not clean the sides of the bowl. The dough should feel very soft and tacky but be easy to handle and have a smooth sheen; it should clean the bowl at the beginning of kneading.

Fermenting: Place the dough in a large bowl and cover it with plastic wrap. Let the dough ferment for about 2 hours. It will probably not rise much, if at all.

Shaping and proofing: Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper or oil it, or flour two linen-lined bannetons. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Divide the dough in half. Shape it into simple rounds or long shapes and position the loaves seam side down on the prepared sheet or in the bannetons. Cover well with plastic wrap and proof at room temperature. It should triple in size; about 5 hours.

Preheating the oven: One hour before baking, position an oven rack in the upper third position and remove any racks above it. Place a baking stone on it, if desired, and preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C/gas mark 7).

Baking: When the loaves have tripled and do not push back when gently pressed with your finger but remain indented, they are ready to bake. If you have proofed them in bannetons, flip each one onto your hand first, then flip it seam side down onto an oiled baking sheet or, if using a baking stone, onto a semolina-sprinkled peel. Score the loaves with a single-edged razor blade in a decorative pattern. Spray or brush them with water and bake for 45 to 50 minutes, until very well browned. After the first 30 minutes of baking, switch the loaves from front to back so that they brown evenly. When the loaves are done, remove them from the oven and let them cool on a rack.

Comments

bwraith's picture
bwraith

ZB,

Just wonderful, great photos, great write-up. Darn, I'll never get to them all, but this is another one I'd like to try soon. I have the book, but this additional level of detail with photos and commentary is enlightening.

Bill

paddyboomsticks's picture
paddyboomsticks

Hi ZB,

         I have to say, this is a _fantastic_ recipe, your praise is not hyperbole at all!

 I got a great crust, and a really excellent, glossy crumb and nice, mild yet bitey flavour.

 

I got a more open, ciabatta like crumb than yours (I'm beggining to suspect my starter is a very hyper active one; my loaves are always beating the given times, and my oven rise is often next to nil, which I suspect means overproofing, too.). Mine also flattened out a lot in the rise, also.

But despite - or as well as this - it is a truly excellent loaf. I'll be making this one again, and I might post some photos later too. Thanks!

yonason's picture
yonason

If only some of my "mistakes" could come out half as well!

mljoseph12's picture
mljoseph12

I love to use semolina in my bread, however I recently moved and am not able to get my hands on any. Any suggestions or links to get some good semolina for a decent price?

MotoJack's picture
MotoJack

I get mine here at the link below.It's $1.99 per lb.I don't know if that's a good price or not.I also get my poppy seeds and other seeds here as well and seeds are very much cheaper than our grocery store here.


http://www.nutsonline.com/cookingbaking/grains/wheat/semolina-flour.html

droidman's picture
droidman

How fine is it?

yonason's picture
yonason

I went to the link you gave, and found that they said...


"this product is certified kosher. This item is certified kosher by the OK.  Visit ok.org for more info."


So I can use it.  I'll be ordering some soon, and maybe some seeds, too, but I haven't looked at them yet.  I get semolina pasta, which I like a lot, so I'm looking forward to making bread with it.


Regards

wmtimm627's picture
wmtimm627

I've found finely ground durum flour at a local Indian grocery at very reasonable prices.

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

http://www.bobsredmill.com/product.php?productid=3481&cat=0&page=1


You could also check their store finder, there might be a store in your area. For home miller's their wheat berries are on sale at 20% off. I don't know if the prices are good or not, since I don't mill my own flour.


Betty

ruth hurst's picture
ruth hurst

New to posting, but I have been lurking for many months. I just love this forum & web site!

I tried this recipe recently & it works out perfectly. I had my family & friends try it out first, but I will certainly be baking this for the Guests at our fishing camp.

I have acquired a 50 lb bag of the semolina for $20 CAN from - get this - the guy we get our fishing bait from. He finds the semolina holds together in the flour & water dough balls he uses in the minnow traps better than AP. He gets it from a wholesale baking supplier in Winnipeg, MN. Not sure which one, but I could ask if anyone would like to know.

I will also be making more for a good friend & helper to take home on Tues. He LOVES it too.
Thanks for such a great go to recipe.

Renee B's picture
Renee B

I know it was an old post, but I would love to know where your bait guy got semolina for that price.

yonason's picture
yonason

this was an accidentl repeat of what I said above, but I don't know how to delete it.


 

RachelJ's picture
RachelJ

awesome looking bread that!

Chrissi's picture
Chrissi

I know this is a pretty old post, but I'm looking at making some of this as my first sourdough recipe with my new (week old) starter - it doubles in about 2 and a half hours right now so I think it's doing well :)


 


I was wondering if any of this can be altered somewhat: for example, I would like to leave the final proofing overnight to have bread in the morning.  Can I do this? Should I refrigerate it?  Or will it just not work at all that way?


Thanks!

madisonbaker26's picture
madisonbaker26

This is a wayyy late response to your post, but I just made these today and did an overnight retardation before I shaped them...turned out pretty great.  I overproofed a little bit, but other than that, they were awesome.

jerminal's picture
jerminal

Hi,

Could anyone help me to find a bread recipe of the bread illustrated on the cover of the Maggy Glezer's book "Artisan Baking".

I thought it might be Filone (Tom Cat's Semolina) , but   the crust looks different and doesn't have sesamy seeds. I looked through the book and couldn't find it, maybe I am missing it. So if anyone knows could you please tell me  on which page it is.

Thank you,
J

 

Heidela123's picture
Heidela123

My entire family extended family and of course me! Thank you for a really lovely versatile loaf
I know this is way late but I am way slow! And this loaf is worth the post!

I buy great semolina of all types at Eastern European markets the best one I have found for this bread is Russan and has a Kiwi and various fruit on the package. I wish I could tell you the name, but no way

This is a consistently good recipe that only varies with my choice of starters, that I like!
So I scraped a vanilla bean into a loaf, I am simplistic in my taste I very seldom even mix more than two types of flour,
I like this bread with a hint of saffron
Pepper ( fresh black fine grind)
Pinch of mace
But
The fragrance of
Olive oil, vanilla and semolina
Made me go fetal!

No matter where I have shared this, not a crumb is left!

Thank you!

Yin's picture
Yin

Hi Zolablue,

The bread looks fantastic. Is the yellowish crumb coming from the semolina?

 

What is the hydration % for the firm sourdough starter?

 

Yin