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Chard and Saffron Tart with Yeasted Tart Dough

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xaipete's picture
xaipete

Chard and Saffron Tart with Yeasted Tart Dough


This tart made a delicious dinner. The tart was lighter than a traditional quiche because of the yeasted crust. We really enjoyed the Chard and saffron filling. (Hans: I’m thinking this is right up your alley and that you will come up with some magnificent variation!) I used crème fraîche in the dough but will use butter next time. Although the crème fraîche made the dough very tender, I think butter would have made the dough easier to work with and given the finished product a more flavorful crust. In other words, I thought the crust was a bit on the bland side.



The tart, dough and recipe, were adapted from The Greens Cookbook by Deborah Madison.


Yeasted Tart Dough


1 teaspoon instant yeast


¼ cup warm water


1 large egg, room temperature


150 to 200 grams flour (I used Guisto’s Baker’s Choice)


½ teaspoon salt


3 tablespoons crème fraîche or soft unsalted butter


Dissolve the yeast in water. Combine 150 grams of the flour and salt in a medium bowl, and make a well. Break the egg into the middle of the well and add the crème fraîche or soft unsalted butter (I used crème fraîche, and an extra large egg, so had to add additional flour), and dissolved yeast.


Mix everything together with a flexible spatula, shape into a loose ball, cover and let rise until double, about 1 hour.




Chard and Saffron Tart


1 large bunch of chard, enough to make 8 cups of leaves roughly chopped


1 tablespoon butter


1 tablespoon olive oil


1 large onion, medium diced (about ¼” dice)


2 cloves garlic, finely diced or pressed


¾ teaspoon salt


3 eggs


1 ½ cups milk or cream or a combination of both (I used regular cream-topped milk)


Large pinch of saffron threads, soaked in 1 tablespoon of hot water


½ teaspoon finely grated fresh orange zest


6 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese (about 1 1/2 ounces)


Nutmeg


2 tablespoons parsley, chopped


pepper


3 tablespoons pine nuts, toasted in a dry pan


Prepare the yeasted tart dough and set aside to rise in a warm place.


Cut the chard leaves away from the steams and chop the leaves into pieces about 1 inch square, wash well, and drain in a colander.


Preheat oven to 375 degrees and soak the saffron threads.


Heat the butter and oil in a large 12-inch skillet. Add the onions and cook over medium heat until soft and translucent (do not brown), about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, chard leaves and salt. Turn the leaves over repeatedly with tongs until they are tender, about 5 minutes. Set pan aside.


Prepare the tart shell: Flatten out the dough and place in a quiche pan (I used a 10” x 2” deep tin quiche pan with a removable bottom sprayed lightly with pan-spray)*. Press the dough out to the edge using your finger tips and up the sides. You can let the dough relax for 20 minutes if it starts shrinking back on you. I was only able to coax the dough about half-way up the side of the pan which was just high enough to hold the filling. The dough should be thicker on the sides and thinner on the bottom. I was pleased to see that as the tart baked both the dough and its filling rose up to the top of the pan.




Make the custard: beat the eggs, stir in the milk or cream, infused saffron thread liquid, orange zest, Parmesan, a few shaving of nutmeg, and the parsley. Stir in the chard and onion mixture, taste, and season with more salt if needed, and pepper.


Pour the filling into the tart shell and scatter the toasted pine nuts on top.


Bake until the crust is nicely browned and the custard is set, about 50 minutes. (I placed the quiche pan on a baking tray. If I had placed it directly on the rack, the baking time might have been shorter.)


Unmold and serve with a salad (I made a salad of butter lettuce and fresh navel orange slices tossed with a herb shallot walnut oil vinaigrette).


Serves 4 to 6



--Pamela

*If you don't own this type of deep quiche pan, I think you might be able to use an 8" inch spring-form cake pan. You don't have to worry about the filling leaking out because the tart dough is like bread dough.

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

looking...so mouthwatering and with salad makes a lovely presentation at the table.  Nice write up, Pamela!


Sylvia

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Thanks, Sylvia. You are also so complementary! --Pamela

SallyBR's picture
SallyBR

Loved everything about this recipe - I've never made yeasted pie dough, seems like something I need to try


 


AND, I just got a last bunch of chard from my garden - I'm tempted to make it this weekend....


 


thank you!

DonD's picture
DonD

So delicious looking... Great job Pamela!


Don

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Thanks, Don. Give chard a try. --Pamela

DonD's picture
DonD

I often use it as a wrapping for my vegetable and seafood terrines.


Don 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

That's a great idea. --Pamela

ques2008's picture
ques2008

i like that!  i've been looking for those molds recently, but the stores i've been to don't have the size i want.


awhile back, you posted a picture of an Armenian store in Montreal when you blogged about lhamajouns, or something like that.  Well, I saw it on my way to laval last week, and i remembered you.  i was in a rush but i made a note to go visit one day.  and it looks spanking new.  i'm dying to see the inside.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

You can buy these pans at fantes.com for a very reasonable price.


http://www.fantes.com/tart-pans.html


Funny but I've been thinking about making Lahmejuns again too.


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/12631/lahmejun-lahmacun-lahmajoun-armenian-or-turkish-pizza


--Pamela

ques2008's picture
ques2008

i did check out fantes.com.  they sell a lot, you could go crazy.  i just love these stores, wished i owned one.


yeah, make those lhamjouns again.  they're quite popular among TFL'ers.

gcook17's picture
gcook17

Wow! This looks good.  I better to pick what's left of the chard and make try this tart out over the weekend.


-greg

xaipete's picture
xaipete

It was easy to make, Greg. I'm sure you'll enjoy it. --Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

We love the Greens cookbooks, not to mention the restaurant!


I'm inspired by your quiche. I've got some beautiful chard, and I just stocked up on pine nuts.


You mentioned that the crust tasted bland. Do you think it was the crème fraiche, or might it just need a smidge more salt?


David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I went to the restaurant once and it was terrific! I've owned the cookbook since 1987! It has some fabulous recipes, e.g., black bean chili enchiladas!


On the salt: I did think that the salt might need to be bumped up when we tried it last night esp. since I had to add extra flour, but I also think that creme fraiche is probably just blander than butter.


The dough was very soft and baked up almost like a brioche or challah, amazingly light and tender and nothing like pizza or FB.


I reheated a slice in the oven for lunch today--it didn't seem to suffer any loss of flavor after being stashed in the fridge overnight.


I've never made, or even heard of a yeasted tart dough before. I'm anxious to try it again perhaps with another filling.


There is a new Greens cookbook out (Field of Greens). I just checked it out on Amazon and was able to view the recipe for Yeasted Tart Dough (pg. 215). It is the same as in the 1987 edition except the creme fraiche option has been dropped.


http://www.amazon.com/Fields-Greens-Vegetarian-Celebrated-Restaurant/dp/0553091395/ref=sr_1_15?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1258758870&sr=8-15


(Field of Greens describes the tart dough as like brioche dough, buttery moist but not so rich.)


--Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

We've had the "new" Field of Greens cookbook since 1993. These books (and Greens Restaurant) rehabilitated vegetarian cooking for me after the blandness of The Moosewood Cookbook recipes.


Greens' black been chili is pretty terrific.


The chard tart sounds better and better, but it's True Cod prepared à la schrod, baked with garlic/parsley/bread crumbs on top, tonight. 


David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

As long as it's True Cod, it sounds good to me. I love True Cod! I'd tried Black Cod (from WFs) once and didn't care for it. We're having a Chanterelle and Laura Chenelle goat cheese pizza brushed with white truffle oil (from Costco--the oil not the pizza!) and a watercress and fennel salad. :-)


Cheers,


Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I don't know if "Black Cod" is really related to "real" cod or not. Did you know Black Cod is the same as Butterfish is the same as Sable (the fish, not the fur-bearing varmint)?


David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I don't think Black Cod is related to True Cod. Black Cod is the same as Butterfish (Sable). Interesting. I guess I'll avoid all those names in the future. Thanks.


--Pamela

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

aka butterfish, sable..is probably one of the healthiest fish on the planet to eat..one of the lowest fish in mercury and high in healthy fish oils.  My favorite way to enjoy it is grilled over hot wood coals with a bit of seasoning.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Grilled, eh? That might make it more appealing to me. Thanks, Sylvia.


--Pamela

kelley515's picture
kelley515

Mom, I mean, Pam, I made this delicious tart for dinner last night, but my crust was also bland, despite using butter instead of creme fraiche.  I think the dough may need more salt.  I also might be tempted to put a pinch of sugar in the dough - to give the salt something to contrast with.  The dough was fairly easy to work with.  After it rose, I sprinkled some flour on the counter and my rolling pin, and rolled it out a little bit (not all the way though - I left it thick enough that I could fold it and pick it up without breaking it) and from there, I pressed it into an 8 " springform pan.  I was able to coax the dough about 1/2 way up the sides, but I think, because I was using a smaller tin than the 10" one you used (I need to go to fantes.com and buy one of those beautiful deep tart pans), the filling came all the way up to the top of the dough.  The dough did rise just slightly taller while baking, so all turned out well, but next time, if using the 8" springform pan, I will not pour all the filling into the pan at once (I might hold a few tablespoons back).  My husband loved the dish!  And, I loved how far I was able to stretch just 4 eggs for a whole dinner!  We both had two pieces last night, and I can't wait to reheat a piece for lunch today.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Glad you and Roroc liked it, Kelley. --Mom

Salome's picture
Salome

I might try a tart inspired by this recipe tomorrow. I haven't got the required ingredients on hand, but I have an idea of a tart in my head:


sourdough-crust (your overall proportions, but as I've got some fresh sourdough on hand I would like to add maybe 50 gms of rye-sourdough...).


for the filling I am thinking about something with pumpkin and spinach, maybe as well seasoned with a touch of saffron.


Well, if I get to make it, I'll post the results.


Looks wonderfully tasty, your tart!


Salome

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Any well thought out combination of interesting ingredients will work. Good luck. Let us know what you come up with.


--Pamela