The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

One-step Panettone?

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breadnik's picture
breadnik

One-step Panettone?

Well, I thought I was preparing for Christmas well in advance but it turns out I wasn't.


I've been reading the BBA at lunch (as is generally my habit, to read cookbooks while I eat -- this is how I learned to cook in the first place) and came across Panettone recipe. I thought, what a great idea, I'll make this for my Christmas farmers' market. My customers would love that -- and I still have plenty of time to practice making it.


No such luck, of course. Having read closer, I realized that to follow PR's recipe I'd have to embark on a whole new adventure of getting involved with barm. As I said in my first post, I am still deathly afraid to try my hand at multiple-step doughs. Basically, it all boils down to my fear of using formulas and getting confused with math.


So I started looking for a tried and true panettone recipe that does not involve barm. My TFL search produced a number of threads (with plenty of beautiful pictures) but no recipes that would be a simpler one-step process. Someone mentioned Jim Lahey's slow-rise panettone recipe and I decided that I would like try that. Is there a recipe on line? I looked and looked but couldn't find it. If it exists, I would really appreciate a link. If it doesn't, is it in his new book?


Which brings up another question. Like so many others, I started baking thanks to Jim Lahey's no-knead bread. So I would really like to have his book. What's your opinion? Is it a book worth having?


I would be very grateful for any thoughts and suggestions.


Nika

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

http://www.andreasrecipes.com/2008/12/25/slow-rise-panettone/


kingarthur.com has a relatively simple looking, straight dough pannetone recipe, among several others. Also a follow along blog, with pictures for at least one recipe.


King Arthur recipes are almost foolproof.

breadnik's picture
breadnik

for the link.


I did see this recipe but I didn't realize it was an exact rendition of Lahey's recipe. Also, I realized that in the BBA there's a recipe for Stollen that I could use. I might also consider baking a Russian Kulich, which, as far as I know, is very similar to panettone. Having lived in Russia most of my life, I have baked Kulich before, and I feel a bit more comfortable baking it.


Nika

Nancy Baggett's picture
Nancy Baggett

Funny that you should mention that particular recipe because I just got a nice comment yesterday from someone who had purchased my bread book, Kneadlessly Simple, and had made my panettone recipe. It is about the easiest one around--nominally uses the direct method, although since the entire batch undergoes a long, cool rise, the flavor is pretty complex. The moistness of the dough also facilities the self-kneading, so the finished bread has plenty of texture. My method for all the breads is more or less similar to the one in Lahey's NYTimes recipe, except I do a retarded first fermentation by calling for ice cold water; skip the hand-shaping in many recipes; and build in a lot of options for slowing down or speeding up the second rise to increase convenience for the home baker.  I don't think this recipe is posted on the web anywhere, but if you send me an e-mail request (there's a place to do that on my site Kitchenlane.com) I will e-mail you the recipe. You could also check out the book from the library or buy it! It is doing very well on Amazon and is on sale there.

breadnik's picture
breadnik

Nancy,


Thank you so much. Unfortunately, our local library has a pathetically limited selection of baking books, so I doubt I'll be able to find your book there. I will look into buying your book, thank you.


In the meantime, I think I will request your recipe by email, since you so generously offered help.


Nika

KenK's picture
KenK

Would it work ok to bake a pannetone in a standard 4 1/2 x 8 loaf pan?  Assuming the recipe used about 3 cups of flour.

amazonium's picture
amazonium

Having just completed a marathon panettone recipe in the past month (and it was totally delicious!) I, too, am looking for a simpler recipe that will give me the requisite airy shreddy crumb and richness. I have a batch of PR's brioche going and I am going to TRY and adapt it for panettone- i.e. sweetening it up a bit and adding the mascerated dried fruit. I haven't made his brioche recipe before so I am making it straight up to see how it bakes up before I go screwing around with it. I am making the rich-man's recipe- 1 pound of flour to one pound of butter. Goodness but it is a wonderfully silky beautiful dough! I can't wait to see the results. Keep us posted if you come up with a workable solution, as shall I.


Amaz


http://www.hippolytacancook.blogspot.com/

breadnik's picture
breadnik

Amaz,


I have made PR's rich man brioche and it is simply wonderful - light, airy and very, very flavorful. In its original form, though, it is definitely not sweet enough to be panettone, and would have to be reworked to become one. I am yet to do that.


However, I now have Nancy Baggett's one-step recipe from her book Kneadlessly Simply which she kindly shared with me before I buy her book. I will give it a try. But before I got her recipe my thinking was exactly like yours -- to try to rework PR's brioche recipe into panettone or use his Stollen recipe from the BBA.


Good luck,
Nika

amazonium's picture
amazonium

Let me know how the new recipe turns out. My loaves are doing their final rise and I was a bit worried that I was going to be baking bricks of butter instead of bread! But after the dough reached room temp and the rise began I breathed a little easier- it looks like it will be superb bread! I intended to bake one loaf of it in a panettone paper just to experiment and I forgot!!! It has been a looooong day so I forgave myself- lol.


Amaz


http://www.hippolytacancook.blogspot.com/

breadnik's picture
breadnik

Good luck with your brioche, Amaz. I will let you know how Nancy's panettone will turn out.


Nika