The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Seeded Sourdough

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swiggin's picture
swiggin

Seeded Sourdough

I just wanted to recommend the recipe given on this site: Seeded Sourdough Recipe, and post a couple of pictures of my try at the bread. I found the recipe to be well done, and the ferment/proof times pretty close to what I used. I was surprised the loaf came out as well as it did, as I thought the seeds may break the worked up gluten (I did do a couple more stretch and folds than called for, maybe that helped, perhaps not), and the oven spring was fairly good for how little a boule I made (may be due to a better scoring pattern, or a higher hydration than I am used to, or luck). Anyways, thanks to the original post-er, as I have found a reliable seeded sourdough recipe that I will definitely make again. 


 Seth


Sorry for the low quality of pictures- taken with a macbook. 


The taste and texture were good, and even had hints of peanut butter (yet there were no peanuts in it, guess it was the roasting of sesame/sunflower seeds).


 

LindyD's picture
LindyD

That's a great looking boule, Seth.   Doesn't the bread have a terrific aroma and taste?  It's one of my favorites.


Since you enjoyed that recipe, I encourage you to pick up a copy of Jeffrey Hamelman's Bread.   It contains many more terrific formulas.

Liam's picture
Liam

Hi


The photos of the bread look great!  I've used the Bread Bible  "Tyrolean 10 grain Torpedo" loaf and it's pretty terrific as well.  I can't recall at this moment whether she tells you to soak the seeds overnight or not, - but do.  Otherwise you might be chewing on little bullets!  I was also told not to include the soy nuggets because they would adversely affect the yeasties.  Odd since RLB uses them.


I couldn't find them anyway.  Instead I bought most of the other seeds and then added Red RiverCereal to the mix, so my loaf is more like 14 - 1/2 grain torpedo loaf.  The half is because I "repeated" a grain or two by using the Red River cereal.


 


I also love your counters!  Would you tell me the colour/pattern/style?  I have always wanted counters that look like Lapis Lazuli.  Neat!


Thanks and Regards


L

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

This is lovely bread. I'll second Lindy's suggestion to get Hamelman's "Bread."


If you like the seeded sourdough, you'll love the 5-grain levain in "Bread."


David

swiggin's picture
swiggin

Thanks for comments. I really should get 'Bread', but at the moment I am just searching around here for the pertinent information for my questions - I really like the recipe/information exchange that seems to be a part of bread making. I am going to look for a more seeded bread (this one only had three), but not sure what advantage of all those extra grain/seeds would have (besides nutritional), I think any hint of taste from the combination of seeds would be lost. 


 Seth


-Sorry, but I have no idea about the counter except it serves the purpose. I think the light in this case is playing tricks.

AOJ's picture
AOJ

Seth, you inspired me to try something new. This is my first attempt at the seeded sourdough. Hand mixed/folded and made three small loaves approximately 1 lb. each. I never get a real open crumb, but it sure tasted good. My wife's new favorite.


 

swiggin's picture
swiggin

Well whatever your doing I would keep doing it. The color of the crust, as well as the crumb look really good (I sort of cheat by baking mine in corningware, don't have to think about added steam). My crust wasn't extremely open, but I still found it nice and moist. From the bread I have baked so far, only a couple, it too was our favorite. 

Liam's picture
Liam

Sorry to reply again after so many days.  Having made a few different seeded breads over the years, including one or more from Bernard Clayton's first book and a wonderful little paperback by Mariana Honig, called Breads of the World, I can tell you that all the different seeds make a very tasty loaf - with a LOT  of fibre.   This loaf is not heavy either.   In particular I can taste the buckwheat (which I have hated from childhood - long story).  In this bread with the other many seeds add nuances of flavour popping in here and there, it works.  So to answer your question, it makes a nice malty crumb with lots of flavours and textures in the mouth.  Since the seeds have been soaked it's nice texture, like biting into a perfectly toasted walnut.   Now everyone else out there may not get the malty taste, they may taste something else.  I have a notoriously poorly trained palate.  The range of my general impressions are UMMMM GOOD, or HHMMM I'M NOT FOND OF THIS.  This is funny because I love wine, fine cheeses, bread, food in general and cooking.  I entertain delusions of knowing wines and yet I still go with UMMMM GOOD and etc!  My fella, who does all the things bad for one's tastebuds, can pick out and name (for example) blackcurrant, or mown grass or licorice as a note in a wine, and he has had no training for this.  While I love him for it and have named him my official taster, it secretly makes me green with envy.  Your loaf does look wonderful though and I may have to get the recipe out and try it again.  My first attempt left me unimpressed, but as usual I had some family disaster which led me to fudging the recipe here and there.


Cheers and keep on baking!  Now, I'm going to see if I can get a reprint of Breads of the World because my copy is in tatters.  It has wonderful recipes that work first time!


L (the real Liam's douce moitie)