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Best generic sweet bread recipe

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urban.gecko's picture
urban.gecko

Best generic sweet bread recipe

Ever since I started baking, I've been trying to recreate a bread that I find at a local chinese bakery. This one is a little different from your run of the mill chinatown bakery, and seems to be a bit higher end with individually wrapped buns. Anyway, they have a chocolate bun type thing that's hollow with a thin layer of chocolate inside. What's special however, is that the bread itself is very soft and yet fluffy, doesn't stick to the roof of your mouth, and when you tear it apart, it comes apart in kind of fibrous chunks rather than just breaking apart like french bread or white bread. I've tried using the popular 'hokkaido milk bread' recipe, and it's close, but not quite as soft. I haven't tried brioche yet and that's next, but if anyone knows any really fantastic moist soft and fluffy sweet bread recipes/has any tips for me to improve my bread (ie longer kneading? Special proofing step?) that'd be awesome. I know this is sort of vague; any help would be appreciated! Thanks again

Darth Lefty's picture
Darth Lefty

Joy of Cooking has a nice one at the end of the bread chapter, for coffee cake, cinnamon rolls, etc.  Is that the consistency you are after?

george's picture
george

I posted a request for the recipe a year ago. Yes I know what you mean and they are found widely in Asian countries.


I have yet to get a recipe that works. I think I have to sign up as an apprentice in one of these bakery to learn.


Can some one help?


 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I've been trying to make a feathery,soft texture in a white bread and the closest I've come is when I use about 1/4 or 1/3 of the flour total as pastry flour as well as the use of milk,egg and butter. I think the egg protein helps build a lattice to trap the CO2 and is more tender than the gluten structure.The lecithin in the egg yolk, the fat in the milk/butter help tenderize the crumb.I think the picture of the feathery crumb on this site:


http://www.camemberu.com/2007/09/hokkaido-milk-loaf.html


is an excellent representation of what I want to achieve. Could this be close to what you want with the chocolate buns? If you are close with the Hokkaido milk recipe, it may be technique that will get you there(and some tweaking to make it chocolate-which will change the hydration/technique).


This:


http://schneiderchen.de/237Hokkaido-Milky-Loaf.html


seems to be a recipe that many people use.


I would also suggest that really mixing this dough for a long period to really encourage long gluten strand development may be an advantage.It will also really hydrate the starch so it gels and may not be so crumbly-almost like a ciabotta.


 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Have you tried the water roux starter method?  If not, maybe you could give it a try.  I made this loaf before, using both sponge and water roux starter, the dough is very versatile and can be used in making buns:


pictures, recipe, and buns made with the same dough.


 



the popular 'hokkaido milk bread' recipe, and it's close, but not quite as soft



 


If you up the hydration, it will produce softer breads.  Commecial bakeries may have used bread improvers to achieve the softness you mentioned.  If you can get a hold of those improvers (I've heard homebakers can get them from Taiwan), you may give them a try as well.


Yippee


 


 

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

Every time I see your bread pictures I want to take a bite of them.  My stepson went to Singapore for internship this summer and I asked him to get me Yvonne Chen's Bread Doctor book.  He found it and he will bring it to me for Christmas.  I am very excited... can't wait to try some of her recipes.  I may need someone to translate but hey once I get the basic down, I should be flying with lots of fun!


Yippee's picture
Yippee

Happy to help.  Just let me know when.


Yippee

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

It will be after Christmas but I can hardly wait. 

dollhead's picture
dollhead

What about the Tang Zhong/65° method of breadmaking?  While I haven't tried it yet, I do plan to.  The breads look great on this website using that technique:  http://wlteef.blogspot.com/2008/03/65c.html


Recipe/technique is based on Chen's works and some say it is much better than Hokkaido bread.  I will be trying it soon. 

urban.gecko's picture
urban.gecko

Thanks for the replies, everyone!! The Tang Zhong method looks like the water roux method...I tried it once while making chinese buns and got a pretty nice texture, although still not *quite* as fluffy. I'll have to experiment - I will report back here!