The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

kneading blade stuck on the Zojirushi shaft - removal tips?

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betty2dogs's picture
betty2dogs

kneading blade stuck on the Zojirushi shaft - removal tips?

I recently replaced my old Breadman [12 years of steady use!] with a new mini Zo. I love this new breadmaker, but I have trouble removing the kneading blade from the shaft after I am done baking a loaf. Does anyone have any suggestions for me? I am worried about scratching the non-stick surface of the pan as that is the only reason I had to finally replace the old breadman - the final straw came when I had to pry an Easter loaf from the pan in pieces.  I wonder if it is important to remove it at all, but don't like the idea that I can't clean the pan properly.

Thanks for any help! 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Put enough water in the bucket to cover the blades and let it soak for an hour or two (or overnight). The instruction manual says not to do that, but I have been for 3.5 years now with no noticable ill effect.

sPh

As I said when the first baby was born, "I don't care what the label says; if it doesn't survive in the washing machine we didn't need it"!

betty2dogs's picture
betty2dogs

Thanks! I soaked it again - longer - and then like magic it sild off.

Cookie in Texas's picture
Cookie in Texas

I usually try and spray the post with non-stick spray.  This helps some.  Then I soak the pan.  If the paddles still do not come off easily I use a plastic disk that is from Pampered Chef to place under the paddle and lift.  The plastic disk comes with all of Pampered Chef's stoneware. 

betty2dogs's picture
betty2dogs

Thanks! I think I will also grease the post a little. That used to work on my old Breadman.

I don't want to use the Pampered Chef blade yet. I did start to use that on my old bread machine bucket and while it was very good at removing the stuck-on crust bits, I think it also marred what was left of the finish on the bucket. Of course, the old bucket had long lost most of its non-stick coating. With this new machine, I plan to be as gentle as possible for as long as I possibly can.

Cookie in Texas's picture
Cookie in Texas

Just to clarify, I never use the Pampered Chef tool to scrape my bucket.  I actually try not to touch the bucket at all.  It is just the right size to get under the paddle and lift with it.  I believe it is a similar material that is safe for no-stick cookware, so if it does happen to touch the bucket it should not do any damage. 

I definitely am VERY careful about the finish on my bucket too.  I definitely want to preserve my bucket's life as long as possible.  I love my Zoji.  We just used it to make pizza dough last night.

betty2dogs's picture
betty2dogs

Now I can picture exactly what you meant. Thanks for clarifying. The little zo is making Ethiopian Honey Bread this afternoon. Mmmm. I use Norman A. Garrett's recipe from Quick & Delicious Bread Machine Recipes.

mcs's picture
mcs

I'm not familiar with your Zoji design, but when I have trouble with my dough hook on my mixer sticking to the post it fits on, I spray food grade silicone (H1) on a tissue and wipe down the post and the inside of the dough hook fitting. It doesn't run, dries very fast, and doesn't gunk up when it gets hot like some oils do.
-Mark

http://thebackhomebakery.com

Kevin B's picture
Kevin B

Because I hate the "big hole" in a loaf of bread, I learned to remove the paddle, after the last “kneading”, ( before the final “knock-down”, which I do with a gentle shake– or with a spatula, at the top edges only: and then ONLY if I feel it really needs it. Whole Wheat I let alone).

 I flour my hands, reach in, remove what dough as may be necessary, and remove the paddle, then gently replace the dough back to center ( as much as is possible).  These breads come out lovely, and in a nice sandwich size. ( Oster machine with a  rectangle shape pan).

In this way, the “stuck paddle” syndrome, no longer occurs. 


Otherwise, it is the temperature involved in baking & the weight-pressure of the paddle pushing the dough, ( along with the fact some baked bread is sticking on the shaft & in the TINY space(s) in-between the shaft & paddle)  that make it stick: Before I started removing the paddle before baking, it would sometimes remain stuck even after a good soaking, so try this.

Invert the whole empty pan over a steamer or a pot of boiling water, while placing an ice cube on the underside ( which is now its "TOP) of the inverted pan, the slightly shrunk shaft, may loosed from the expanded paddle: I did this twice, before deciding to remove the paddle BEFORE the bake cycle.



Hope this might help someone! ! !

Kevin B's picture
Kevin B

Thanks so much for the 
food grade silicone spray tip!

 

tabasco's picture
tabasco

I read somewhere (I think on the Zoj site) that if you have trouble getting your paddles out of the machine to look underneath the pan and gently turn the wing nut (if your pan has one) under the paddle.  I did this and it released beautifully. 


Might not be useful for all machines, but worth a look-see, anyway.

lhowemt's picture
lhowemt

I picked up a used Oster 8511, without a manual.  The manual is the mail, but I want to make bread now!  I found a great website detailing how to figure out how to use the machine, and it starts out with removing the paddle.  Well, I can't get my paddle out.  I'm going to try some of these techniques tonight/this weekend, but I'm wondering if some machines have paddles that don't come out.  A friend had a machine that she said the paddle didn't come out of.


Thanks!


Laura

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Remember the flour and water paste you made as a kid. Thats essentially what a basic dough is. It can become almost "rock hard" when dry. The dough will always work its way between the paddle and the "peg/post" it is attached to. If/when the dough is cooked/dried, the paddle will often be stuck to the post, somewhat.


I only use my machine for kneading, and by the time I get back to clean the dough pan, the paddle is stuck, somewhat.


You may be able to visably see that paddle is made to come off. See pictures below.


Try filling the pan with a little warm to hot water to a level that completely covers the paddle. This may soften/dissolve the offending "paste". Then after 30-60 minutes or so, try to gently jiggle the paddle upwards off the peg.


 You may have to use one hand inside the pan to grasp and pull/jiggle the paddle, while the other hand is holding onto the "wingnut" under the outside bottom of the pan.


lhowemt's picture
lhowemt

I tried soaking it once last night, and it "looks" like I got all the goo out.  A toothpick was also helpful.  My paddle hole and peg doesn't look quite the same.  The peg isn't solid all the way to the top of the paddle hole, I'll have to post a picture later, if this last (24 hour) soak doesn't work.  Once I get home from work I'll get giving it another jiggle, and possible try the steam/ice technique.  I like the expand/contract idea.  I expect this used unit might be REALLY glued together!  Thanks for your info and photos.

tabasco's picture
tabasco

Maybe try to run the kneading cycle with hot water in the machine?

lhowemt's picture
lhowemt

Thanks!  I got it off after clicking the bowl into the machine, and twisting the paddle bach and forth a bit, then taking it out and rinsing in hot water.  I did this about 3 times then it pulled right off.  quite the YUK it exposed underneath!  On to figuring out how big it is, and how to run it.  Fun fun!

fogfire's picture
fogfire

WE got a bread maker for $1 at school sale.  The blade was cemented to the post.

Soaking didn't seem to help, not sure water could get in there.

I took a strong 8inch zip tie. you can get them a Fry's or hardware stores, radio shack etc.  Made a loop by just starting to feed the tie into the locking end.

looped it over the blade side, and pulled it to the very center. Then was able to hook two fingers into the loop and pulled up and at slight angle to keep the loop pressing on the center.  That gave me the leverage and direct up force needed to free the post.  When you pull on the blade that puts and angle on the force and can work against you.. If you can get something under the very center.. and pull pretty much straight up.. that is where the reduced force needed is.

 

(Yes science geek meets bread maker)

Chuck's picture
Chuck

To keep it from happening again, I find I need to completely get all the old dough off. Soaking in cool water helps  ...but isn't enough by itself. I want to get it truly clean; on the other hand I do not want to scratch it.

So I use an old plastic picnic fork as a scraper tool. It's tougher than dough, but not so tough it can scratch the teflon surface. I've broken off two tines so I can thread the remainder inside the hole and get all the bits of dough off. No more stuck paddles for me!