The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Recent breads and two fruit desserts

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hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Recent breads and two fruit desserts

Here are some of the breads baked over the last couple of weeks:


First is a pain au levain with whole-wheat (p. 160 in "Bread"):


Pain au Levain


The original formula is great and it's a very nice dough for practicing folding, shaping and different slashes. It's a pleasure to see the cuts open up and bloom during oven spring, and the subtle flavour works well with just about anything. One of my all-time favourite loaves that I keep making often!


Below is a photo of a levain stuffed with dark raisins:


Raisin levain


The loaf is based on the formula for "Golden Raisin Bread" in Hamelman's book (p. 172), but I made this without commercial yeast, and with 25% prefermented flour from the levain instead. I found a 2hr. bulk ferment and an overnight retardation to work well, and I soaked the raisins in water prior to mixing, so they should not rob moisture from the dough. I like the addition of rolled oats in the formula, which works great with the raisins.


Finally, yesterday I made a flax seed rye with an old bread soaker (click here for Hamelman's recipe). It's a 40% whole-rye loaf, with a healthy dose of flax seeds. I omitted the commercial yeast here as well, and instead lengthened the final proof to 1 hr 45 mins. I would also like to add that my sourdough was fully ripe after approx. 12 hrs, so I did not let it go the full 16 hrs as suggested in the formula. I also had to add some water to get the desired degree of stickiness - I'm guessing an 82 - 83% overall hydration is right for my flour. After final shaping, the loaf was rolled in a mix of sesame, flax and caraway seeds, and placed with the seam side down (i.e. seed side up) in a brotform. Below is a photo of just after final shape (left) and just prior to baking (right):


Flaxseed rye proof


Here's the loaf just after pulling it from the oven - once again baked with the seam side up (seeded side down):


Flaxseed rye


... and here's the crumb:


Flaxseed rye


I think it's a very nice formula that produces a loaf with a deep flavour and a slight sour tang. It keeps for days due to the high hydration, and is a solid every-day sort of bread. Recommended!


Finally, two fruit desserts this week: A galette (using cream cheese pie dough) with nectarines and blueberries:


Galette


... and a charlotte with raspberry bavarian cream (and the remaining blueberries):


Charlotte


 

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, hansjoakim.


I particularly like the looks of the rye with flax seeds. Thanks for the link to the formula. I may try to make it this weekend.


David

LindyD's picture
LindyD

You need a sign on  your kitchen door, Hans, reading artist at work.  Gorgeous breads.


Seeds on the bottom....that's a new concept to me.  I imagine they get quite a bit browner than if baked on the top, but that must add a deeper nutty taste to the bread. 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Gorgeous baking, Hans!  Did I hear an echo!


Sylvia

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

I know I've asked before, what would be a whole rye equivalent ? I can purchase, BRM dark rye and light rye. Would either one suffice?


Am I understanding correctly that I need a LB of old bread for altus?


Thanks,


Betty

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Thanks for the compliments, everyone :)


David: I think you'll love it, so do have a go.


Lindy: Thanks, Lindy :) I also thought that the seeds on the bottom would get dark and perhaps even bitter, but quite the contrary... The photo doesn't show it very well, but they almost didn't colour at all. Actually, they would probably be more toasted (and nuttier) if they'd been on top during the bake. Perhaps they don't dry out as much when they're jammed between the loaf and the baking stone? By the way, have you tried sifting flour into the brotform to avoid sticking dough, Lindy? Nothing's more frustrating than having the loaf tear and deflate as you're trying to peel it out of the form...


Sylvia: Thank you :)


Betty: Hmm... perhaps you should put the rye flour question to David, as he's an expert on US flours. "Whole rye" is 100% extraction rye flour, so that would exclude light rye at least. Dark rye sounds like the way to go to me - what separates this from other whole rye flours is probably its ash content. According to the label, my whole rye has some 1.9% ash content. And yes, for the full batch, you'd need 1lb old bread. I used some 50gr. toasted old bread in my scaled down formula.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I have the rye sour and soaker ready to mix the final dough. I used some "old" miche made with First Clear flour for the altus. My saved old rye was frozen, and I didn't want to take the time to thaw it.


I scaled Hamelman's formula to make one 1 kg boule. I'll post the numbers after the bread is baked and I have photos to share.


BTW, I used a white rye sour as my "starter" but fed it with Bob's Red Mill Whole Rye Flour. The term "Dark Rye" sometimes refers to whole rye but not always. American flour terminology is so unstandardized.


David

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

I have Bob's Red Mill Dark Rye flour. I checked at their website and they don't have Whole Rye flour. Are you sure that's what you have?


Betty

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Betty.


If the text on the packaging is truthful, I have what Bob's Red Mill says I have.




David

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Sometimes I take things too literally..I thought it had to say "Whole Rye flour".  I didn't realize thay are one and the same. Now I can proceed..


Thanks again, Betty

LindyD's picture
LindyD

No, Hans, I've not tried using the sifted flour technique on my brotform yet.  About all I've baked over the past months is my trusty Hamelman sourdough and his bagel formula because both are easy and can go into the refrigerator overnight.   Too little time this summer for anything but the easy breads.

I hope to next month, however.  Right now the seasons are starting to change so my free time is devoted to getting in the winter's firewood, garden clean-up, and all the other necessary autumn chores.  

I miss rye and salivate just looking at your flax seed bread.

 

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

You busy bee!


You know, if you bake me a chewy sunday morning bagel, I'd be happy to help you out with wood chopping and raking leaves.

cake diva's picture
cake diva

Hans,


Your breads look always stunning.  I will hang my apron the day my breads turn out like yours. --- cake diva

Jw's picture
Jw

really nice! I like your approach with the seeds, it also looks nice on the cut loaf. I will give that a try as well. compliments to the north!

Cheers,
Jw.

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Thanks cake diva (is that your real name? ;) and Jw! Try it and tell us how you like that flax rye :)