The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

dough and weather.

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marsa's picture
marsa

dough and weather.

I work in a bakery and I am having trouble with either having to much water in the dough or not enough.  I know that weather has something to do with this but it is very frustrating .  Any suggestions will help.

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uluro's picture
uluro

Thought I'd take a stab at addressing this subject. First get an instant read thermometer. Mix all the dry ingredients, including instant yeast; take the temperature of the dry ingredients. Ex. if it is 65 degrees, then the liquid needs to be 65 dregrees. A base temperature of 130 degrees to 150 degrees is what you're looking for. The base temp depends on what machine you use to mix with. I use a cuisinart= 130 dregee base temp. With a Kitchen Aide mixer,base temp is 150 degrees. Once the dough comes together in the mixer or processor, it should have a temp of between 75 and 80 degrees. I use a raising bucket for the 1st rise and do not grease or oil either it or the dough, just cover it.

You may need to adjust this base temperature depending on the mixer used. Hope this wasn't too confusing.

 

uluro

mountaindog's picture
mountaindog

uluro - I use a dough raising bucket as well, but I have been very lightly oiling them with a mist of spray oil so the dough does not stick. Is there a reason why I should not do this, other than maybe it is unnecessary if I use a plastic scraper to clean out any stuck dough?

Thanks for the info...

uluro's picture
uluro

uluro The main reason NOT to use oil or grease in a bowl or raising bucket is that the dough will rise more easily if it doesn't have to "climb" a greasy wall.  I too use a plastic scraper.

Another note: use only one method of measurement; by weight or volume and do not interchange within the same recipe. I always weight everything, especially flour and it really doesn't matter what type of flour as long as you weigh it.

mij.mac's picture
mij.mac

Oh, I didn't realise that the dough climbed the walls of the bowl. Wow, that explains how I got dough on my ceiling. <g>
mac

uluro's picture
uluro

   TO MAC, WHAT UTTER  RUBBISH!

 

mij.mac's picture
mij.mac

Yes you're right it is utter rubbish. I was having  a little joke. 

mac

mij.mac's picture
mij.mac

Are you weighing or measuring your flour by volume?I weigh everything and only ever get different results when I use two different flours. I have never in all my life as a baker had to adjust a recipe because if different weather conditions, different flours yes, mix up the same weight of flour and water with flour A and flour B and you'll get different results. You should have a table of values for your flours.
mac

bakker_be's picture
bakker_be

The only way to get consistent results is indeed working with weight for all ingredients. I've been a professional baker for almost 20 years in Belgium, and the problems described are really common even among my former colleagues.

Another thing that's really important if you want consistent results is that your flour manufacturer needs to have a tight quality control, to avoid a difference in water absorption from one batch to the next. That's the reason why in my bakery I preferred to buy a slightly more expensive flour in stead of seeking to buy the cheapest to make "an easy buck" at the expense of stable quality.

Bart

titus's picture
titus

Bart:

Where in Belgium is your boulangerie? What is its name?

I live down the road in Lux and spend a lot of time in Belgium.

bakker_be's picture
bakker_be

I stopped due to health reasons 6 years ago. It was in Niel, a 12000 inhabitant village near Antwerp.

Bart