The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Ciabatta Techniques

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crumb bum's picture
February 20, 2007 - 9:58pm -- crumb bum

 Hello AllI would just like to thank the member who posted their technique for making a decent ciabatta.  If I could relocate the post I would assign you all to read it, its make the lightbulb go on stuff.  Before reading this post my ciabattas were nothing more than 2 inches of standard french bread with a single seperated bubble/membrane/cave on top.  The post stressed you want the "finished" loaf to be 2 inches thick and emphasized dimpling and pushing the dough out an inch or so thick.  In the past I would proof it in a couch supporting the sides thinking it would lead to all those great bubbles.  This one I let proof without any support.  I also was impressed that the post made their ciabatta at 72% hydration (memory?)  I always was at 80%.  Bottom line is my technique was bad.  This ciabatta is 75% hydration, three folds, dimpling/pushing to make the dough 1 inch thick proofed and baked.  I also baked this dough using the no preheat method.  1/3 cup water on floor of oven, place on middle rack, "no" baking stone, turn oven on to 525 for 10 minutes and down to 440 for remainder of time.  Thanks again for the help.Da Crumb Bum 

Hello All

I would just like to thank the member who posted their technique for making a decent ciabatta.  If I could relocate the post I would assign you all to read it, its make the lightbulb go on stuff.  Before reading this post my ciabattas were nothing more than 2 inches of standard french bread with a single seperated bubble/membrane/cave on top.  The post stressed you want the "finished" loaf to be 2 inches thick and emphasized dimpling and pushing the dough out an inch or so thick.  In the past I would proof it in a couch supporting the sides thinking it would lead to all those great bubbles.  This one I let proof without any support.  I also was impressed that the post made their ciabatta at 72% hydration (memory?)  I always was at 80%.  Bottom line is my technique was bad.  This ciabatta is 75% hydration, three folds, dimpling/pushing to make the dough 1 inch thick proofed and baked.  I also baked this dough using the no preheat method.  1/3 cup water on floor of oven, place on middle rack, "no" baking stone, turn oven on to 525 for 10 minutes and down to 440 for remainder of time.  Thanks again for the help.

Da Crumb Bum 

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Comments

Trishinomaha's picture
Submitted by Trishinomaha on

What did you bake this on? It's lovey, by the way...

 Trish

crumb bum's picture
Submitted by crumb bum on

Hey Trish

That is right, I did not use a bake stone on this bread.  With the no preheat method I simply place it on an aluminum baking sheet and place that on the middle rack of the oven.  Thanks for the complement.

Da Crumb Bum

Trishinomaha's picture
Submitted by Trishinomaha on

I'd love to try this - can you share the recipe or tell me where you found this?

Thanks!

Trish

andrew_l's picture
Submitted by andrew_l on

Could you tell us more about the no - preheat method? It sounds interesting - certainly more economical in energy. Presumably, instead of oven spring as such, it keeps rising until the oven reaches a temperature where the yeasts are killed off? Is it suitable only for ciabatta, or would it work equally well with , say, a 2 kilo miche? Or - Julia Child's baguette????
Andrew

crumb bum's picture
Submitted by crumb bum on

Trish

The recipe is basicly a 75% dough.  565g of flour, 425 of water, 10g salt, and a little under 10 grams yeast (2 tsp).  For the poolish I put into a bowl all the water and half the flour and 1/3 or so of the yeast and set over night until its ripe.  Put the poolish and flour into mixer and mix until you get a rough dough 1 min or so.  Cover and let set 20 min or so.  Add salt and remainder of yeast mix on medium speed for 2 minutes.  Put into a bowl and let set 40 min. the dough is still pretty rough and undeveloped at this point.  Give the dough a stretch and fold.  Repeat this 2 or more times as needed.  The dough should be much firmer and bubbly and alive. Let set 30 more minutes good side up then cut in half.  Place good side down on a couch or the counter on some rice flour pulling and pushing and dimpling the dough out to approx. 3/4 to 1 inch thick.  Don't force it let it rest if needed.  Proof until swollen more and gently turn over and place on pan.  You can brush off excess flour if need at this point.  Bake as I describe above or whatever method you use.  Let me know how this works.

Da Crumb Bum

    

Trishinomaha's picture
Submitted by Trishinomaha on

I'll give it a try this week-end. I long for the day when my bread will have a crumb like your picture!

 

Trish

crumb bum's picture
Submitted by crumb bum on

Hey Andrew

I posted a comment to the forum describing this method.  If you search using No Preheat you will find my description of the method.  This method certainly saves energy and allows you to wait until the perfect moment to bake.  As for the oven spring I am not sure what the difference is.  Both methods make the yeast grow to produce gas until they die at around 140f.  I have used this method succesfully on large 2 kg Miches, 500g batards and ciabattas.  I have not used it on panned breads but will probably give that a whirl sometime.  One website I read about this on claims the temp profile using this method and traditional methods are very similar.  It would be neat if someone out there could verify this using a temp. probe and graphing the temps at given times.  Give it a try and let me know how it turns out.

Da Crumb Bum