The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Edouard Loubet

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Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

Edouard Loubet

Have you ever had the experience of searching for some one or something high and low?  We are in the dead of winter, but I am already thinking of spring.  A few years ago we were on our way to the jacaranda capital of Australia, Grafton, in the state of New South Wales, 300 km south of Brisbane.  Every October Grafton is as beautiful as April in Japan with its cherry blossoms.                


                                             


                  Spring in Grafton                                                           Spring in Brisbane  


Just before we reached the city I saw a quaint little antique store with a book store attached to it.  We went in and I found a cook book there, "A Chef in Provence" by Edouard Loubet, who, I learnt later on, owns a two Michelin starred restaurant in Lourmarin, south of France, 60 km north of Marseille.    Ever since then I have been searching on Amazon.com regularly to see if there is any new book by him.   Then, recently with my new interest in bread, I've been buying a few books in Amazon.fr.  Just last week it dawned on me that I should check on Amazon.fr instead for Loubet's book.   I couldn't believe my luck.  He published his second book last month! "6 Saisons en Lubéron."  So, after nearly three years of waiting, I've got another book by him.  


Every so often some bloggers at TFL will contribute some ideas to how best to utilise leftover starters or leftover dough.  Now, here is another idea for leftover dough.  It is one that I have used time and again.  I first got this idea from Loubet's A Chef in Provence.  I adapted his "parcel of baby leeks" (page 52) with the addition of prosciutto and gruyere (or bacon and cheddar as in the example below).   Or, instead of spring onions that I used below, asparagus and brococcini will work very well too.     


 


            


 


         


                                                                                                   


My version looks like a far cry from Loubet's original.


                             


Shiao-Ping

Comments

Reuben Morningchilde's picture
Reuben Morningchilde

The images are plain lovely! I worked some time in Pretoria, South Africa, and I remember the jacaranda flowers very well. It is such an impressive sight, isn't it?


And, to be honest, I like your little parcels much better than the ones in the book. Yours look genuinely homemade, with all the love that entails, and not so dressed up.

Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

My first ever experience with jacaranda was spring of 2003 in Athens for a Pavarotti concert.  I had never seen anything like it.  It was in a crowded street with lots happening.  The tree stood next to a church silently amid all noises.  I literally stood there with my jaw open, in awe. 


So it was most delightful to find jacarandas in Brisbane when we moved back here almost 5 years ago.  The colors they give to a street is like a God sent.  My idea of heaven is a pot of Oolong under these magnificent trees, and see the flowers fly in breeze.  


Shiao-Ping 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Beautiful photos!  Your parcels look delicious and I would like to give them a try.  Thank you for the suggestion!


Sylvia

gcook17's picture
gcook17

All your pictures are beautiful, Shiao-Ping. 


Why are the finished bread and onions shiny?  Did you bake them and then brush them with butter?  They almost look like they were fried.


One of our neighbor has a jacaranda tree and we marvel at the color every year when it blooms.  The fallen flowers never look as bright and colorful as the ones in your picture, though.

Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

... I brushed them with olive oil when they were hot out of oven.


 

Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

... some jacaranda trees have more vivid color than others.  I went to my neighbour's for tea the last jacaranda season and this is directly in view from her bacony ...



so lucky.  My jacaranda trees are tucked in behind my back yard where you don't even know they existed.


Shiao-Ping

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

Really cool idea.  Can you give us the formula/proportions for the dough?  You don't have to write out the whole recipe.  Thanks in advance.


Summer

Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

You can make it with a simple straight dough formula like this one:



  • 300 g white flour (bread flour or all-purpose)

  • 180 g water

  • 15 g oil

  • 1/2 tsp instant dry yeast (or up to 1 tsp)


Shiao-Ping

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

Thanks.


Summer