The Fresh Loaf

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Linzer Torte

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claudio's picture
claudio

Linzer Torte

Hi all,


I'd like to reproduce an old favourite of mine, a nutty and jammy tart of Austrian traditions. Does anybody have a recipe for "Linzer Torte"?


I remember, growing up in Switzerland, having slice after slice of this cake throughout the winter months.


I have found a couple of reliable-looking recipes on the net, but I'd like to hear if anyone here has a recipe that could be considered very close to the original...


 


Thanks in advance,


claudio

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

I can have a look when I get home, because I think I do have a recipe or two. If I'm not mistaken, the dough itself is made up equal amounts of AP flour and ground nuts. Typically a mix of almonds and hazelnuts (two parts almonds to one part hazelnuts). Use raspberry jam or preserves for the filling, and finish with the lattice on top.

claudio's picture
claudio

Cheers, I'd really appreciate that...!


I agree, it should be a very short pastry with nuts, flour, butter and yolks. I have found some recipes that use boiled yolks as well.

ejm's picture
ejm

I haven't had Linzertorte in Austria or Switzerland - I've only had the Linzertorte sold by an Austrian(??) couple at the farmers' market around Christmas time. It was on the expensive side though so I made a very reasonable facsimile of the market Linzertorte using butter, unbleached all-purpose flour, ground almonds, sugar, lemon zest, cinnamon, kirsch and apricot jam. No egg though.  (edit: trying to strike out the erroneous "no egg" but the line is not showing... there IS an egg in our Linzertorte recipe!)


While it might not be absolutely correct, it is really really good.



-Elizabeth


 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

This link looks pretty good.  My tips:  Grate the nuts if you have the chance.   It creates a fluffier, crumblier crust.   Tart black current jam is choice, red current, raspberry or tart cherry jam would also work.   Important that the filling is tart.    Let stand several days tightly wrapped before eating.  


Mini


 


 

claudio's picture
claudio

ejm:


your recipe looks good, even though if I could find a Linzer Torte here in Sydney, I would buy it, even if on the expensive side...


Mini Oven:


how do you grate nuts?!? I recall raspberry jam being my favourite filling, but i'll have a look around if I can find any blackcurrant jam. Anyway, the recipe in the link you posted is actually the one I'd saved as the one to try first... I'll let you know how I go.


claudio

ejm's picture
ejm

Eeek!! My statement "no egg" was really bothering me. I was SURE that I used an egg! Sure enough, I looked at the paper copy of my recipe and it looks like I forgot to type egg into the online version. I've made the correction now.


Mini, I love the idea of blackcurrant filling!!


-Elizabeth


revised Linzertorte recipe: http://etherwork.net/recipes/linzertorte.html

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

You mean grating without including your knuckles?   Well, don't use a box type grater or the fruit of your labours will be meat.  :)   Here is a link:


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4440/walnut-flour


I do have a hard time with the yolks in this crust recipe, normally they are hard boiled and pressed through a seeve to make the finest crumbs before adding to the crust.  You can always add a little schnapps (Kirsch, Cherry flavoured Rum) to the recipe here and there if you have it.


Go with raspberry.  Black current jam is very hard to find, I just thought if you happen to run into some or have red ones in the garden (they are ripe at the moment) you might try some or even combine berries.


Mini

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Hi Mini. Love your nut machine. When this recipe came out, almond flour probably wasn't widely available, but now it is. No need even to grate anymore. Just hop over to TJs and pick up a bag. (I realize you can't probably do that but perhaps the asker of this recipe can.)


--Pamela

claudio's picture
claudio

I'll see if I can get hold of any "nut-grating" apparatus...


By the way, at the moment we are enjoying quinces, rhubarb and kiwi fruits down here (Australia), the seasons being upside down as well! We're actually making plans to celebrate "Christmas in July", as so many European expats down here do every year.


claudio

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I love to park a bowl of them or mix them into decorations to scent the air.  They also thicken marmalade.  That's where the word comes from, from the name of the Quince, Quince jam in Portuguese.  Rhubarb in Linzer torte?  Why not.  I'm not too keen on the color but if you look for the red stems....

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I agree. Why not rhubard!


--Pamela

xaipete's picture
xaipete


This is my favorite Linzer tart recipe. I make it about once a year and always get asked for the recipe. It is a lot of work but well worth it. It was published in Food and Wine magazine in the 1980s.

This is a double-crusted tart filled with a jam-like filling. 

TO MAKE THE CRUSTS 

Combine in a medium bowl: 

3 hard-cooked egg yolks, which have been pressed through a seive; 1/2 cup whole almonds (3 ounces), which have been blanched and skinned, and then ground in a food processor with 1 tablespoon of sugar until fine; 1 tablespoon cinnamon;1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg; and, 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves. 

Beat 3 sticks of cold butter, cut into tablespoons, and 3 tablespoons finely grated lemon zest (from 4 large lemons) in a large bowl at high speed until light in color, fluffy and soft peaks form (about 10 minutes). 

Beat in egg yolk-almond mixture, 1 cup of sugar, and 2 teaspoons almond extract until well-blended. 

Mix in 1 1/2 cups flour by hand until a dough forms. 

Divide the dough in half and shape into two 6-inch disks. Wrap tightly and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 2 hours or overnight. 

TO MAKE THE FILLING 

In a heavy, medium, nonreactive saucepan, combine: 1/2 cup of sugar with 1/3 cup of water and bring to a boil over moderately high heat. 

Boil the mixture just until the sugar dissolves, about 30 seconds. Stir in 1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest, 2 cinnamon sticks, a pinch of freshly ground pepper, 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg and a pinch of ground cloves. Increase the heat to high and boil until the mixture is thick and syrupy and turns a light caramel color, about 3 minutes. 

To the saucepan, add 1 bag (12 ounces) of fresh cranberries and stir to coat with the syrup. Cook until some of the berries begin to pop, about 2 minutes. Stir in 3/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice and 2 tablespoons of sugar. Reduce the heat to moderate and cook, stirring occasionally, until most of the cranberries have popped and the mixture is thick and jam-like, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool to room temperature. 

When mixture is cool, grease an 11-by-1-inch fluted tart with a removable bottom or an 11-inch ring with 1 teaspoon butter. Roll each disk of chilled dough into a 13-inch circle (about 1/8 inch thick) between 2 sheets of parchment paper--the dough is very difficult to handle. After each is rolled, transfer to a cookie sheet and refrigerate until firm enough to handle, atleast 10 minutes. 

When ready to assemble, peel off the top layer of parchment, invert the dough into the prepared tart pan, then peel off the remaining piece of parchment and carefully pat the dough into the pan. Trim the excess dough from the rim. Refrigerate the dough again until well chilled, at least 30 minutes. 

ASSEMBLING THE TART 

Remove the cinnamon sticks from the cranberry mixture and stir in the preserves (it is best to use seedless-preserves). Remove the tart shell from the refrigerator and spoon the filling into the shell, spreading it evenly over the bottom. 

Peel off the top layer of wax paper from remaining peice of chilled dough. Invert the dough over the filling and peel off the other layer of parchement paper. Crimp to seal the edges and trim off any excess dough even with the rim. 

With a small sharp knife, cut out about eight 1 1/2 inch diamonds from the top crust. Mist or brush the top crust lightly with water and sprinkle 1 tablespoon sugar on top. Bake for about 55 minutes, until well browned. Transfer to a rack to cool slightly before unmolding and serving.


--Pamela


 

ejm's picture
ejm

I really like the idea of using hard-cooked egg yolk in the crust! How do you cook them, Pamela? (I'm assuming that you separate the eggs so that you can make meringues out of the whites.)


-Elizabeth

xaipete's picture
xaipete

There are a number of good methods to making perfectly cooked hard boiled eggs.


http://elise.com/recipes/archives/005251how_to_make_perfect_hard_boiled_eggs.php


The main point is that you don't want any grey to form on the yolks. The whites aren't used, although you could cook some extra eggs and throw the extra whites in with them for egg salad.


--Pamela

ejm's picture
ejm

Pamela, I really did think you were separating the eggs and hard-cooking the yolks only.  Elise's method of hard-boiling eggs in their shells is a good one (very similar to what we do).


Good idea to use the extra whites in egg salad (luckily, my husband likes egg salad). But I'm still wondering if there is a way to hard cook the separated yolks so the whites could be used for meringue. Maybe poaching??


-Elizabeth

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Not that I know of. You need the eggs to be firm enough to sieve. Eggs are cheap; I would have no problem even throwing the whites out.


--Pamela

claudio's picture
claudio

Pamela,


I'll probably end up using jam from a jar, even just for the simple fact that it's not fresh berry season down here.


Thanks for your recipe - I'll have to try it out (or the one in Mini's link) next week. I'll keep you posted!


C

xaipete's picture
xaipete

You can use frozen cranberries :-).


--Pamela

ejm's picture
ejm

Black currant jam is relatively easy to get here, although not all the jam companies make it as tart as we like it. We just bought a jar of black currant/pomegranite jam at the supermarket  - not bad at all - but I think I'll still stick with apricot jam for Linzertorte.


Thanks for the link to the post about your nut grater, Mini. I did wonder how you were grating the nuts and had visions of majorly skinned knuckles!


Ground almonds are easy to get here in Indiatown but ground hazelnuts are not so common so this method will come in handily.


Pamela, I know what you mean about just deciding to toss the egg whites out rather than use them. But I still might try hard-poaching yolks. (I'm on a binge of trying to create as little waste as possible right now - there is a garbage collectors' strike that doesn't seem to be likely to be resolved very soon....) I guess that cooked egg whites could also be put onto the compost heap.


-Elizabeth

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 


 They are so easy to grow here in Southern Ontario. We always have a good harvest which should be soon.


But Linzer torte I much prefer raspberry jam,,,,,,,,


I make blackcurrant jelly also blackcurrant juice........ qahtan

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I just substituted stewed rhubarb in my latest Linzer torte.  Used orange zest instead of lemon and also used grated hazel nuts & pumpkin seeds.   It smells too good!  Can't wait.  First to give it a day or two.   I used the Joy of Cooking recipe which includes cocoa powder and raw egg yolks.  The dough sat in the fridge at least 2 days.

I tried a little warm wedge and so far so good.  :)