The Fresh Loaf

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Conversion question

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T4tigger's picture
T4tigger

Conversion question

I'm looking for help in the method I'm using to convert standard recipes to sourdough. In either Breads from the LaBrea Bakery or The Bread Bible I read the following method: 1) add the total weights of flour and water [I'm using a weight of 140 g./cup for flour and 225 g/cup of water] 2. Find 30% of the above weight to determine the amount of starter to use. 3. With 100% starter, divide by 2 to determine weight of flour and water in the starter. 4. Subtract the weight of flour and water in the starter from the amount called for in the recipe to know how much to use.
I tried this with the recipe for No-Knead bread and ended up after 18 hours with dough that was more like a starter than an actual dough. I'd appreciate any help!

Colleen

T4tigger's picture
T4tigger

I'll try the different weights for flour and water as well as starter innoculations and see how things work.  I guess Grandma's "till it looks right" method wasn't so bad after all!

I love the NYT No-Knead recipe because as a substitute teacher, I often get a 6:00 a.m. notice that I need to work. I had too many days when I had prepared to bake and ended up with over proofed dough because I was dealing with 22 kindergarteners when the bread was ready to go into the oven!    With the 18 hour proof, I can mix things up the night before and have it ready for the final rise when I get home from school.

I use kneaded or folded recipes when I know I'm going to be home for the 8-10 hours necessary.  To me, kneading is wonderfully relaxing!!

RFMonaco's picture
RFMonaco

Try the Excel program here plus mucho other info!

http://www.sourdoughhome.com/downloads.html

Potter's picture
Potter

Thanks RFMonaco for a reply. 

This spreadsheet looks helpful and the fact information also.  I'll give a sweet rolls recipe a try and post how they go.  I am going to mix, let double, form, and let double, bake on the same day.  I have a strong, active, mild starter.  Do you think this is the best approach?

I was beginning to despair that I would recieve any help on this forum.  Thanks again.

Dee Potter

RFMonaco's picture
RFMonaco

Yes Mr. Potter, I think that baking the same day will give more satisfactory results. Reducing the chance of overproofing is much safer. Let us know what happens. That Excel tool took a lot of work for that guy to put together, I'm impressed.

Potter's picture
Potter

I also would like an easy, reliable way to convert my mother’s yeast recipes to sourdough.  Most of my favorite ones are sweetdoughs so I would like to keep the sour taste in these recipes down to a minimum. 

 

I am so confused.  I read that feeding a counter starter 3 times a day will give me a milder starter; then I read that leaving one in the refrigerator…….

 

I am about ready to just purchase some yeast and give up.  Any help would be appreciated.