The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pan Pizza

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foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

Pan Pizza

[DELETED BY AUTHOR]

Comments

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I will definitely try this for our next pizza party. It has all the earmarks of a success and not too much trouble when we have so many mouths to feed. Thanks for posting such great details. c

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Looks nice! I'll give it a try.


--Pamela

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That is beautiful.  Would you mind if I featured it on the homepage?

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

Thanks and no of course not, it would be an a honor!


Cheers,


FP


 

cake diva's picture
cake diva

FP,


Looks very yummy! 


My preference is thin crust; I have been using the Peter Reinhart recipe for making Pizza Margherita.    Have you tried this recipe to make thin crust base?

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

Yes you certainly can use it to make a neapolitan style margherita pizza  - in fact I did exactly that with some left over dough (I ran out of pans!) 



At 75% hydration, it's a little trickier to shape than the usual pizza dough...forgive the blurry picture of a somewhat misshapen pizza. It's definitely not what I'd call traditional neapolitan though. I'm working on another recipe for that. First batch mixed and resting as I type.


Cheers,


FP


 

breitbaker's picture
breitbaker

hey this is awesome looking!! my husband and i are thin-crust pizza afficiandos! so i would love to try this in a thin crust version...

SusanWozniak's picture
SusanWozniak

Your finished pizza crust looks divine.  I am curious about the one reader's comment on preferring a thin crust.  This looks pretty thin to me.  I haven't made pizza in years and I really want to return to it.

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

Thanks Susan,


I guess it's all a matter of preference but as you noticed, the dough from the above recipe can be stretched out pretty thin. Alternatively those preferring something closer to 'sicilian style' pizza can use the same dough to get a breadier, thicker style of pizza. It's a fairly flexible recipe. 


Thanks again,


FP


 


 

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

<double post>

Sherry Hall's picture
Sherry Hall

What is the mature storage starter?

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

Hi Sherry,


Forgive me, but I'm not sure if your question was regarding the terminology or the nature of the starter I used. Anyhow, to cover both possible enquiries:


Mature storage starter = starter that has reached peak activity and is ready to use.


The starter I used in the above recipe is maintained at 100% hydration (equal weight flour and water) and is fed with an unbleached all purpose flour (supermarket brand).


Hope that helps.


Cheers,


FP


 


 

dbsoccer's picture
dbsoccer

What is storage starter? Where do you get it or buy or how do you make it.

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

 


Storage starter is sourdough/'natural yeast' starter maintained (fed) on a regular basis. I feed mine twice daily when possible but many people keep their starter in the refrigerator and feed every 3 or 4 days.


Here are some links showing how to go about making your own:


http://www.wildyeastblog.com/2007/07/13/raising-a-starter/


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/handbook/sourdough-starters




It's important in this recipe to use starter that is at the peak of its activity. If using refrigerated starter, it's a good idea to feed it once at room temperature before making the biga.


Hope that helps,
FP

 

MJO's picture
MJO

Hi Sherry!


I'm curious--Is it a challenge to transfer the pre-cooked pizza from the aluminum pan onto the pizza stone without losing ingredients or shape?  Also,  is there a quicker way to heat up your pizza stone?  I live in the south, and in the summer months our house would heat up rather quickly (even with the air on).

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

Hi,

I don't know if you were trying to address the question to Sherry or myself but (my) recipe above does not require any pre-cooking or transfer. 

Just stretch out the dough in the pan. Give it a short proofing time, add toppings and then place the pan on top of the pre-heated pizza stone.

You can probably get away with heating the stone for just one hour. I based the timing on my stone in the UK with a very slow-to-heat oven. However the oven I'm using in Tennessee (not quite 'deep south' but still the south, right? :) ) heats up quicker. Essentially you need about an hour of time spent at the maximum oven temperature + a few minutes broiler time.

Hope that helps and happy baking!

FP

 

feedmittens's picture
feedmittens

Your dough's crumb looks excellent!  What would you think was the biggest contributing factor to how airy it came out?  Type of flour (you added bread flour to the mix)?  The mature starter you used?  Wetness of the dough?  Baking technique?  Proofing time after you stretched it out onto the pans?


I have been trying for a pizza dough that would rise like that for a while and can't seem to get the right combo yet, but I'm a total noob at this.

foolishpoolish's picture
foolishpoolish

Quote:
 What would you think was the biggest contributing factor to how airy it came out?

The high hydration.


Quote:
 Type of flour (you added bread flour to the mix)?

Bread flour (King Arthur unbleached) and All purpose (also King Arthur)


Quote:
The mature starter you used?

100% hydration (equal weight flour + water) starter fed with supermarket brand all purpose flour at 12 hour intervals. Kept at room temperature


Quote:
Wetness of the dough?

Close to 75% hydration


Quote:
Baking technique?

Pre-heated baking stone (550F for an hour or so) with 10 minutes broiler just before putting the pan in the oven (whereby I switched back to 'bake').


Quote:
 Proofing time after you stretched it out onto the pans?

About half an hour for the first one (longer for subsequent pizzas).


Hope that answers some of your queries. Let me know if you have any other questions. Have fun with the pizza-making!


Cheers,


FP







Mumsie Leonie's picture
Mumsie Leonie

I made this pizza with my Ischia starter over the two days. I currently am on a Pizza pass working at perfecting my skills.  Dough was super hydrated but not much different than ciabatta so working with it is mind over matter.  This is the best darn sourdough pan pizza dough I've ever made.  Kudos to you FP . This one is worthy of *****.


 

Mumsie Leonie's picture
Mumsie Leonie

I made this pizza with my Ischia starter over the two days. I currently am on a Pizza pass working at perfecting my skills.  Dough was super hydrated but not much different than ciabatta so working with it is mind over matter.  This is the best darn sourdough pan pizza dough I've ever made.  Kudos to you FP . This one is worthy of five stars.


Thank you