The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Whole Flour Sieve

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Swadeshi's picture
Swadeshi

Whole Flour Sieve

Does anyone know where to purchase a reasonably priced sieve that wont sift out too much of the bran in whole wheat flour?

xaipete's picture
xaipete

We've had a few discussions about sieves in the past but I don't know that any conclusion was reached. This site has a lot of good quality sieves. How fine they are depends on their number. I don't understand either the numbering system or which number would be appropriate for sieving whole wheat flour, but I'd love to learn this information.


http://www.fantes.com/sifters-shakers.html


--Pamela

twgiffin's picture
twgiffin
proth5's picture
proth5

My #20 Keene classifier is my go to sieve for getting out enough bran to create high extraction flour - however it does depend on how finely the flour hase been ground originally.


My set has done yeoman's work this past year or so and is still in great shape.


Altough these are not technically food safe, the dry flour is in contact with them only briefly and I feel there is little chance of any kind of leaching...

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Thanks. I'll order one. --Pamela

proth5's picture
proth5

When I am sifting through the #20, my wheat is still at the "moderately fine cracked wheat" phase - if you are sifting after the wheat is finely ground, you results will vary considerably.


The real tricks to the high extraction process is the tempering (which toughens the bran) and the multi- pass milling (which sifts out the bran before it is ground too finely - because it is a lot tougher than the endosperm).  I believe that you use an impact mill and neither one of these processes is recommended for use with an impact mill.


But the classifiers come in a variety of sizes and one may meet your needs. 


Hope this helps...

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I know I won't be getting real high extraction flour with my impact mill, but I'd like to just be able to approximate it (pretend, by sifting out the bran). Any idea what size I ought to order? I could grind on coarse.


--Pamela

proth5's picture
proth5

I would need to work with samples of your ground wheat to tell for sure.


#20 is my coarsest seive - I have them down to #100 - which I use for my pure white flour - so know if you you are grinding very fine about 50% of your flour will pass through a #100.


If you would send me samples, I'd be willing to send them through various seives and report out.  Send me a message if you are interested and I will give you my address.

dlt123's picture
dlt123

I'm with Pamela, I have a Grain Master Whisper Mill and would also like to sieve out some bran.  Like Pam, I too would like to know what mesh size is best suited for inpact flour mills?  i.e. 20 mesh or higher?


Dennis
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Belief has no affect on reality.
My Website: http://www.roadtobetterliving.com


 

Swadeshi's picture
Swadeshi

I am sifting hand ground flour. The Keene sieve sounds good. However, I do not want high extraction flour. I would like to sift out the coarsest bran still leaving in a good amont of the other bran. Would the #20 Keene allow enough of the bran through? The end result should be a high fiber content flour. The majority of hand sieves I have seen on line and in stores are way too fine for my needs.

proth5's picture
proth5

on how fine you are grinding and how fine your bran is ground.


I like the #20 and I pull out my bran from the process when I have ground finely enough to reach 80-85% extraction.  If I wanted higher extraction rates, I could grind more finely. 


The Keene classifiers exist in larger mesh sizes - which is one thing that makes them attractive.  My personal opinion is at the price, you may wish to try a couple of them ans see how they work.