The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Parchment Paper

  • Pin It
xaipete's picture
xaipete

Parchment Paper

I was able to purchase 1000 sheets (full sheet-pan size) of parchment paper from a supplier for a under $35.00 including tax. I was skeptical about this purchase because it was such a large quantity, but went ahead with it anyway because of the price.


So what if I just purchased a life-time supply of sheets; it makes sense price-wise and I can store the box under a bed.


Funny thing is that I just love the big size and quality, and find that I'm using it for other things too. It is just perfect for wrapping up a loaf of bread either to keep or to give to a neighbor, cut in half and folded it makes a great serving plate for pizza, slicing bread and not getting crumbs all over the place, etc. And it is eco-friendly!



--Pamela

swtgran's picture
swtgran

I think I must have purchased the same size box.  I usually cut mine in half and have shared with friends and family. 


It is a good deal and you always have some on hand.  I will do again IF I ever run out.  Terry R 

baltochef's picture
baltochef

Be aware that there are four grades of parchment paper that are readily available to professional bakers..These papers generally come in 1000 sheet boxes that are sized for full sheet pans..


The first, and thinnest grade, is generally coated with one of a variety of non-silicone coatings..These thinnest papers coated with the non-silicone coatings that are not quillon are the least useful, in my professional opinion..They are generally a one use paper at any temperature above 350F..The paper degrades, and breaks or tears when removed from the oven..At high temperatures above 400F the corners and edges of the paper actually start turning brown..


The most economical paper, price wise, is generally the quillon-coated thinner paper..Quillon is the best of the non-silicone coatings..It has a greater release value than all of the other coatings, with the exception of silicone..These are the second most used papers in restaurants due to their cost per sheet..They can generally be used more than once before the paper starts to deteriorate from repeated exposures to heat..Usually 2-4 times..


The next grade, the third grade, is a heavier weight paper than the first two that is coated with quillon..The heavier paper and a heavier layer of the coating, make for a paper that will withstand higher temperatures for longer periods of time before starting to deteriorate..This grade is generally the second most costly grade of parchment paper..These papers can generally be used up to 6-8 times..A lot of bakeries buy this type of parchment as a lower cost alternative to the silicone coated parchment..


The last grade of parchment paper is the heavy weight paper coated with silicone..It has the highest release value, and can withstand higher temperatures for longer periods of time than any of the other papers..A box of 1000 sheets will cost between $80.00 to $100.00..These papers are really the best value as they can be wiped off with a barely wet sponge, or cloth; and reused many, many times..Up to as many as 15-20 times, depending upon the temperature of the oven, the length of time that the paper spends in the heat, and the type of food being cooked on the paper..


A box of 1000 sheets cut in half will last the average home baker for at least a decade..$100.00 divided by 2000 = $0.05 cents per sheet..Add in the fact that the sheets can be used over many times and the cost per 1/2 sheet of the best grade silicone treated parchment paper falls to roughly $0.01 cents per sheet per use..Or less..


Bruce

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Thanks for all this information. I probably got one of the lower grades. But it's working for me in the oven, although I do notice it gets browner than the stuff that I use to use that came on the roll.


--Pamela

sephiepoo's picture
sephiepoo

I was re-reading this thread again, because I recently bought a box of what I believe you're calling the second grade of parchment - quilon coated and thinner paper.  I picked it up from AceMart a couple weeks ago, and have been using it pretty regularly, and I'm wondering if anyone else has purchased this as well?


I'm finding I'm just generally not happy with it.  Anything with a glaze on it tends to stick, and the bagels I just made stuck horribly right out of the oven, even though I'd also misted the paper with oil before putting the bagels on it. The baguettes and sourdough loaves have been fine, but the paper is definitely one use only in this case.  It's pretty brittle to the point of being burnt when it comes out.


At the rate I'm going through it, about 3-5 sheets per bake, I'm guessing it'll only take me 2-3 years to finish off this box instead of the 5 I'd originally predicted! Any thoughts or opinions on what I may be doing wrong? Or is it just the paper?

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I use some PAM on it and it seems to work fine.


--Pamela

sephiepoo's picture
sephiepoo

That was the really weird part with the bagels today - I did mist the paper with oil and they still stuck.  I'm boggled..

swang2000's picture
swang2000

Is there a difference between Bakery Pan Liners and Parchment paper??  I am using Qualite Bakery Pan Liners and it prevent the French macaron from raising on one side.  I bought them at Resturant Depot.  Please Help!


 


Selene

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Bruce,
Interesting breakdown of parchment paper. My own experience of the paper I have purchased from King Arthur isn't quite what you describe however. I just looked at the shopping site and they claim the paper they sell is a half sheet of Heavy Duty Silicone coated paper. The problem is that while I get usually 2-3 uses from the paper before it is so crisp and brittle the edges fall off and break.. When I spray water on the paper it curles and no way could I move dough that has set in place for more than a few minutes. If it is silicone coated, it seems pretty absorbent to me. Makes me wonder.


15-20 uses, that isn't what I'm buying.


Eric

baltochef's picture
baltochef

Eric


The parchment paper that I have I purchased from Sysco through a bagel shop that I used to work for about 6.5 years ago..I got the best price due to the Sysco rep bringing it to us instead of my having to pay shipping..This was their best grade of silicone coated paper, and it cost me a little less than $70.00 for the box of 1000 full size sheets..I had to special order it as most restaurants simply went for the less expensive choices..I cut them in half, and stored the paper in two 4" deep, brown,  corrugated cardboard, half-sheet cake boxes that our pastries were delivered to us in..I reinforced the boxes with substantial amounts of clear packing tape to keep the boxes from tearing, and to protect the cardboard from dirt..The parchment that I purchased from KA prior to my splurging for the paper from Sysco was as you described..


I should have noted in the above post that those 4 categories are only approximations, not hard and fast rules..Silicone coated paper can sometimes be had on lighter weight paper stock..Truth be told, there are many companies producing parchment paper for restaurants and bakeries..It is just that the home baker has no access to the majority of these parchment paper choices..


One thing that is a constant is that the best grade of parchment baking paper is always a heavyweight grade of paper with a heavy layer of silicone anti-stick coating applied to it..And, that the current price for a box of 1000 sheets of this best grade parchment paper will be in the $100.00 category..Plus, or minus a little bit depending on the manufacturer and vendor..The 15-20 times of usage would apply to something like baking shortbread cookies at 300F, or meringue / daquoise at 250-275F..At higher temperatures the paper does break down faster..Still, the best grades of paper will always out perform, and out last the less expensive grades of parchment paper..And, can be reused a greater number of times than less expensive papers; if that is a consideration for the user..


I would estimate that over 50% of the parchment sold for commercial use is the less expensive paper..In my experience these papers are at best a 2-shot deal..Most of the time if you try to reuse the paper it ends up breaking or tearing, which can often lead to ruined desserts..Also, as the less expensive papers break down due to heat exposure, their coatings become less effective at the same rate as the paper deteriorates..Which means that reusing the less expensive papers can sometimes lead to foods sticking to the papers, with less than exceptable results..


Bruce..

xaipete's picture
xaipete

The stuff I bought is definitely single use grade! If I manage to out live the box I purchased I will looked for a higher quality. This has been a very interesting and informative thread. Who would have thought humble parchment paper could generate such a lively discussion!


--Pamela

S. Allen's picture
S. Allen

Bruce,


I teach at a school and our food service uses SYSCO. As I live in a fairly remote area of NE Arizona this might be my best option for parchment. You wouldn't happen to have any additional specific information regarding the parchment you purchased from them (via the bagel shop)? I'd like have a bit more knowledge before I contact our SYSCO rep.


thanks, S. Allen


 

baltochef's picture
baltochef

At the time I purchased it, the parchment that I got from Sysco was the best, most expensive parchment that they sold..


You should know that SYSCO in the United States is a conglomeration of quasi-independent companies that are broken up into regions..I cannot remember just how the company works, but I seem to remember that each region stocks slightly different products in their warehouses..


This means that you might need to wait several weeks to get a product transfered from another region's warehouse(s) if the one in your region does not stock it..


I purchased my parchment back in 2002-2003..At that time it was right around $70.00 for the box of 1000 sheets..Cut into 1/2 sheets, I have only used maybe 100-150, or so, sheets to date..Unless one is baking up a storm 7 day a week, a box of 1000 sheets shout last the average home baker a decade, or so..


Snag a couple of 3"-4" deep half sheet cake, and quarter sheet cake, corrugated cardboard boxes that you reinforce with clear packing tape to store the cut down sheets of parchment in..You need a real sturdy box that will last as long as it takes to use up the paper..The time spent covering the box with tape will be well worth the time spent and the cost of the tape..


Good luck with your search!!..


Bruce

mredwood's picture
mredwood

 Thank you for the discourse on parchment paper. I learned a lot. Does any one know where to find this in Portland Or? Where have folks bought theres? Thanks again. Mariah

PaulJason's picture
PaulJason

Does anyone have a link?

baltochef's picture
baltochef

I would try and see if a local bakery will allow you to purchase a 1000 sheet box through them instead of ordering from afar over the internet..Such a box weighs approximately 15-20 pounds..Although only 1.5", or so, thick, it is a solid mass of paper, and is an awkward size at 27" x 18"..The shipping would be expensive, with a pretty good chance of the box getting damaged in transit..Places like Restaurant Depot might be another consideration, although these places rarely carry top-of-the-line products..Their forte is low prices..


Bruce

niagaragirl's picture
niagaragirl

Amazon does sell parchement in both rolls and sheets. Just use of of the links off this site to get into Amazon portal, then search Parchment Paper. I don't know what grade they sell, but it's worth a look.