The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

areas of high humidity

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Lisaloo's picture
Lisaloo

areas of high humidity

Hi to you all from the east coast of Canada.  I am thrilled to have found this site because I am suitably impressed by the breadth (pardon the pun) of knowledge many of you have.  I am fairly new to bread making as well - I have tried a few times over the years but we have also lived in many different regions of the country (from Vancouver, BC to Montreal, QC to Yellowknife, NWT and now on the east coast) and I am finding my success here in the east to be quite sporadic.  I suspect the high humidity is to blame (because it could not possibly be the baker!!!).  Today I am making granary bread and it is raising beautifully - maybe too fast.  Today it is sunny and partly cloudy but other days my dough sits there like a lump.  I have a warming centre on my stove and have found that it helps, but I still have sporadic success.  Any suggestions on how to alleviate the impact of rainy days or high humidity would be greatly appreciated. 


Cheers to you all et bienvenue pour votre assistance!


Lisa

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Welcome to TFL. If you are having sporadic problems with your bread, it might not be the humidity but your yeast. A lot of us here use SAF Red instant yeast.


--Pamela

cryobear's picture
cryobear

Lisa,
I know of what you speak. I live half way up Kilauea over looking the Pacific and have Mauna Loa in the back ground. So, if I'm not getting the heat from the lava flows, then it's the snow wind blast. At any time the temp and humidity can run up and down like a roller coaster. I just throw the stuff in the mixer and hope for the best. Living in the jungle however does have a bonas. My wild yeast smells and taste like a delicate wine. Look at it this way; 8000 years ago, you took what you got and were happy. Good Luck, and Welcome.
Cryobear

gosiam's picture
gosiam

I am in Vancouver, B.C. and I only nodded my head in total understanding when you spoke of humidity.  "Throwing the stuff in the mixer and hoping for the best" sounds like the smartest advice one could extend.  On the other hand, there are folks here who will protect the dough from... be it humidity, cold, or heat in many, very inventive ways.  I heard of people keeping the rising dough in big plastic storage boxes, microwave ovens (powered off), or specially-designed rising boxes that maintain steady temperature.  Still "hoping for the best" seems like a sensible option.  Let's have faith and bake some bread!



Welcome again and show us some pics.


Gosia

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I just saw this picture of your baguettes. They look beautiful!


--Pamela

Deonia's picture
Deonia

Hi , I live in a high humidity area ( Florida Panhandle) and find no problem with it. It's the temp that matters when I have sourdough starter working or bread rising. I tend to agree with another poster, that it might by the yeast you're using. I wish someone could give you a difinative answer, but I dont think there is one." Circumstances always alter cases" as they say :-) Right now i'm wrestling with wild yeast starters and there are a LOT of variables with it but the bread made with one is awesome! Happy baking.


Deonia