The Fresh Loaf

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Joe inspired me to try the Pane Siciliano

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demegrad's picture
January 21, 2007 - 10:46am -- demegrad

This is Pane Siciliano from BBA, the only change I made was that I didn't use and commercial yeast. I made the part of the pate fermentee from my sourdough starter, and everything went off beautifully, just the rising takes longer than called for in the recipe. JoeS inspired me to make these loaves this weekend with his beautiful picture of his pane siciliano.

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Srishti's picture
Submitted by Srishti on

Oh my God those are beautiful!!! and beautiful pictures as well... I'll definitely have ti give it a try.

mountaindog's picture
Submitted by mountaindog on

Demegrad - those are awesome. I'd like to sub starter for the yeast too when I try these. How much starter did you use to make the Pate Fermente may I ask? How'd they taste? Could you still taste the semolina?

demegrad's picture
Submitted by demegrad on

Don't mind at all, I wrote it all down so I can tell you pretty exactly what I did.  This particular recipe though is one of those ones that Peter's uses a high amount of preferment in though.  More than I usually use but if it works it works.  My typically method of building a preferment is to double the weight in flour once or twice.  This time I just used one build up.  So here's how it went.  (I keep my starter at 100% hydration)

 Late friday night:  Mix Unbleached Flour (77grams) and Bread Flour (77 grams), with Starter (100%hydration by wt. 304 grams), Salt (5.8 grams), and Water (47 grams).  This results in a 65% hydration pate fermentee just like what is called for in the book, but it makes 18 ounces of pate fermentee where the recipe only needs 16 ounces, I just make a little extra to account for some sticking to the spoon and bowl and whatnot, so that I don't have to anally scrap the bowl to get out what I want.  Six hours later, it was more than doubled so I mixed the dough.  About four hours later (I didn't write that part down and I can't remember exactly) it doubled again and I shaped the S's.  Popped right in the fridge for the overnight rise.  Four hours out of the fridge and they were ready for the oven.

demegrad

http://www.demegrad.blogspot.com

demegrad's picture
Submitted by demegrad on

I forgot you asked about the taste.  This is the first time I've used semolina for bread, actually I bought the semolina because I wanted to make homemade pasta but haven't done it yet, but you can absolutely taste the semolina in it.  As I said this being the first time using semolina in bread I can really tell that it is not like anything I've had before.  I really like peter's use of sesame seeds on top, they toast up nicely during the bake.  When you taste the bread you get a very subtle nutty flavor with the semolina that complements the intense nutty flavor on the crust from the toasted sesame seeds.

demegrad

http://www.demegrad.blogspot.com

mountaindog's picture
Submitted by mountaindog on

Thanks so much! That takes the guess work out of modifying the recipe for me. I also keep a 100% hydration starter. I can't wait to try this next weekend, hope I can get my S's to look as nice as yours and Joe's.

sewwhatsports's picture
Submitted by sewwhatsports on

Demegrad-

What was the rest of the dough ingredients for the Pane Sicilliano?  I wrote down the Pate Fermentee ingredients and would like to make this to take as a gift to family later this week.  Your help would be appreciated. 

Rena in Delaware

pumpkinpapa's picture
Submitted by pumpkinpapa on

I've been wondering about using sourdough for this for some time now. I know exactly what you mean about the taste working with the sesame seeds, very yummy! Thanks for sharing your formula!

sewwhatsports's picture
Submitted by sewwhatsports on

Okay-  I have the dough fermenting now.  I have done 2 folds on it and my concern is this--the dough is very slack.  I will continue to do the folds but I am concerned how I will roll it out to make the bagauette before I shape it into the S's.  Is this what it is supposed to be like?  Demegrad or Joe (or anyone who has done this before)--your help please... 

Rena in Delaware

demegrad's picture
Submitted by demegrad on

I just used a pretty standard baguette shaping method.  This is the general description of how I did it.

 First I gently got the dough out of the bowl with a flexible bowl scraper.  As I did this I tried to form a rough rectangle out of the dough.  Then as close as possible split it into three long pieces.  This strands were about one foot long.  I then made a tunnel down the center and folded the bottom up and the top down to get some surface tension.  Pinch the seam then roll gently to two feet long.  Shape the S, and that's it. 

demegrad

http://www.demegrad.blogspot.com

JoeS's picture
Submitted by JoeS on

Those look great. Your shaping is much more consistent than mine was. I may have to try again this weekend. I'd really like to try a sourdough version, but I killed my starter through neglect and have yet to start another. I like the sound of the starter in BBA.