The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

scalding milk to avoid bad bread??

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helend's picture
helend

scalding milk to avoid bad bread??

Has anyone else come across the information/idea that milk has to be heated until almost boiling befor it is used im bread recipes?  I was told this as an "old wives tale" (by a very old wife!) and have just noticed this http://food.oregonstate.edu/faq/bread/bread4_faq.html

Any comments??

helend 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

It is in a lot of bread books, cookbooks, and bread recipes. Whether or not it is correct advice is as you note another question!

 

I don't much care for milk so I sidestep the whole thing by using yoghurt in recipies that call for it.

 

sPh

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

From what I understand, it's no longer necessary because the pasteurization process has essentially pre-scalded your milk before you buy it. If you're lucky enough to use truly fresh milk, though, you probably ought to scald it.

 

As part of a recipe testing group I'm working with, some of us scalded the milk while others didn't. It didn't seem to make any difference. 

pumpkinpapa's picture
pumpkinpapa

This is an "old wives tale" that faded out of popular use with the onset of pasteurization. Similar fears exist with whole eggs which led to the breakers market where one can buy liquid yolk or whites.

However, having made bread with raw milk, I can say that the flavour is much better than with pasteurized milk. Especially if you use Guernsey or Jersey milk.

jm_chng's picture
jm_chng

It isn't an old wives tale it's founded in good, solid science. Cows can get infections that we can pick up, so can chickens. Salmonella is quite serious and can be picked up from eggs. However much work has been done since the eighties to make eggs safer in UK at least. Good hygiene should never be dismissed as an old wives tale. If an individual chooses not take it seriously that is his choice but one should never advise others that it's just nonsense. Legislation in Britain forbids the sale of raw milk in shops to protect the public for infected milk. Milk isn't pasteurised to honour Louis Pasteur
Jim

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

Actually, I don't thnk the concern with milk in bread is bad bacteria. Pasterization requires milk to be held at about 72 degrees C for less than a minute, and bread, even sandwich bread, is hotter than that for a longer period of time, so anything infectuous that pasteurization would kill, baking bread would also do the trick.

The problem, or so I've read in Hammelman's Bread and other books, is that certain proteins in milk weaken the gluten structure unless they are denatured first by heating the milk to about 190 F, which is ... what ... about 88 C?

These proteins are already denatured in dry milk, apparently. But, like I said earlier, in an experiement I was part of, there didn't seem to be any difference between loaves made from scalded milk and loaves made from fresh. It seems that the proteins in question, or the bulk of them anyway, had already been denatured through pasteurization.

robadar's picture
robadar

What about using fresh milk vs. powdered milk.  Is there any difference in taste or behaviour  of the bread in baking?

 

RB

pumpkinpapa's picture
pumpkinpapa

Well that depends on the individual, I can taste the difference between powder, pasteurized and raw but some people can't. I think it's from drinking cultured milk so much that I can taste the difference.