The Fresh Loaf

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Diastatic malt = Hombrewers dry malt extract?

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jbraas's picture
jbraas

Diastatic malt = Hombrewers dry malt extract?

Hello everyone. I am new here and new to bread baking. My question is about diastatic malt. I saw a couple posts about this, but did not see this answer and didn't knwo if someone might be able to help. I am also a homebrewer. I have some dry malt extract for brewing. Is this the same / can it be used as diastatic malt?


Thanks for any insight!

Stefania's picture
Stefania

Fellow Homebrewer! 


 


We homebrew also and have DME (dried malt extract) and malted barley in many forms around.  We have always assumed Diastatic Malt Powder meant just what it's name is.  Diastatic refers to the enzymatic capacity of the malt to degrade starch into mono, di and trisaccharides. Additionally, there are proteolytic enzymes active in malt.  Going by this assumption I have crushed two-row and six-row pale malt barley in a malt crusher then sifted out the hulls.  I then put the grits in a spice grinder and reduced them to powder, resulting in Diastatic Malt Powder (at least by my definitiion).  I would love to know if I am doing this correctly. 


Dried Malt Extract (DME) (unhopped) is available through homebrew channels very reasonably priced.  I keep it around for yeast starters and my wife uses it in baking, I assume its the same stuff as sold thorugh baking channels.  Of course, the process of making DME destroys all enzymatic activity leaving, essentially, dried wort (unfermented beer).


I would love to hear from somebody in the baking business to let me know if I'm on the right track or just a pompous idiot.  I know the beer making process intimately but only bake bagels and pretzels.  My wife bakes everyting, and I mean everything to perfection, what a life.  Beer and Bread. (oh, don't forget sausage and lunch meats to go on that bread)


Cheers,


Stefania (well, Stefania's beer drinking husband half)

jbraas's picture
jbraas

Thanks for the reply! Not knowing if I was roght or not (I baked earlier) I went ahead and used the DME I had on hand from brewing (starters, etc like yourself). The end reasult was pretty good i think. Not sure what teh end difference might have been if I used something from a baking supply company..... if any...


Thanks again.

Jam13's picture
Jam13

I have been using the diastatic malt in my bread for sometime.  I found the instructions for making the malt in one of my cookbooks and gave it a try.  I originally sprouted barley but because the unhulled barley is no longer readily avail., I started using soft pastry wheat.  I'm careful to dry the sprouts below 170 deg F.  I grind the entire sprout and depending on which grinder I use, I'm careful not to let it heat up.  I keep the malt in a glass jar in the fridge.  I do notice a change in the texture of the crumb.  The malt seems to make the crumb a little more chewy.


Hope this helps

Stefania's picture
Stefania

That's the same thing I am doing except you are malting your own barley and I'm starting with the barley malted already.  You can simplify your process by finding a homebrew store and buying a pound of 2-row malted barley (about a buck and a half).  Then all you have to do is grind it.  Since the husk will still be on it you can crush it with a rolling pin and easily sift out the husk from the grits (malted barley is brittle).


If you found your directions in a bread book then we are on the right track, thanks.


 


Stefania (well, Stefania's beer drinking husband half)


 


P.S.  The 170 degree caution is correct, that is the temperature at which amylase enzymes permantly denature and bringing a mash up to 170 degrees is the final step in making wort.

Jam13's picture
Jam13

I will try the brew supply for the malt

rcrabtree's picture
rcrabtree

I guess I'm late to the party.  Stefania, I didn't know you are a homebrewer!  So am I but I've been to busy to brew so I've resorted to baking to satisfy my creative urges.


I've been wondering about the difference between diastatic malt powder and DME myself.  I think you are right, that the DME has no potent enzymes left due to the manufacturing process.


I'm not sure either, but it sounds like your definition of the difference is correct.  That said, it seems like people are trying to sub one for the other.  My thoughts are that they would not have the same effect on the bread.  DME is basically dehydrated wort, which is what is produced after the enzymes have converted the starches to sugars.  If malt powder is just dehusked, ground malted barley, it still contains enzymatic potential and a substantial amount of uncoverted starch.  Adding DME to bread would be similar to adding straight sugar, honey, molasses, etc.  Adding malt powder, the enzymes would start (slowly?) converting starches, which may feed the yeast, but not in the same way as adding actual sugar to the batch.


If I can find a suitable recipe maybe I will do some side-by-side test loafs this weekend, using your procedure for creating malt powder (maybe I'll do a little extra and see if I can make homemade ovaltine!)