The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

No Patience

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sadears's picture
sadears

No Patience

Okay.  I have absolutely no patience.  My starter is bubbling, but not much.  Correct me if I'm wrong...I remove half my starter and feed it 50/50 water and flour.  If I do this more than once a day, will it be ready faster????

Steph

SourdoLady's picture
SourdoLady

Sorry you are having problems. How long has it been since you made your starter and what did you use to make it with? (what kind of flour). Yes, it will help if you feed it every 8 hours. Don't use chlorinated water. Add some fresh rye or whole wheat flour if you haven't been using whole grain already. When you feed it, continue to dump out at least half of it and then make sure the feeding is at least twice as much as the starter after you have dumped. Don't give up--you will get there. Your starter should be very actively bubbling with frothy bubbles on top when it is ready.

jm_chng's picture
jm_chng


Hi Steph,No patience answer feed 1:6:6 twice a day.Answer with patience: : -)to get a really healthy starter you need to feed it about 36+ times it's weight in flour every 24 hours. I know this seems a lot but his actually only works out to 1:6 twice a day. You can feed your starter either once a day as I do or twice a day or as many times as you like really. What is important is how much you feed in a set period. Ask Kath in the yahoo group about feeding a starter. How much water you feed is really up to you. I find it's best to use equal amount by weight because it's easier to work out my recipes. If you use a lot of starter it will taste better that way too.
As a rule of thumb your starter is active when it doubles in volume when fed 1:1:1 by weight in 2 hours. So you see 3x3 twelve times is a lot more than I suggested and way more than most folks suggest in a 24 hour period. Jim

sadears's picture
sadears

Thanks Jim and SourDoLady,

I originally started right after Thanksgiving.  The key word there is originally.  I thought it wasn't doing what it was supposed to do so I chucked it.  I hadn't found this website at the time and read "don't give up.  keep feeding it."  I'm using water and flour in almost equal quantities, more flour than water.  Just regular unbleached flour.  After my failure yesterday, I took what was left and fed it twice more.  It actually started increasing after I fed it a little while ago.  Does wheat and rye give it more oomph?  I had thought it would work faster because of my altitude.  Thought I read that somewhere.

Thanks again for your help.

Steph

jm_chng's picture
jm_chng

Patience is the most difficult of minds to find and the easiest to lose. : -) 
Jim

sadears's picture
sadears

Jim,

 

Funny, in most things, I have the patience of a saint.  But, when I set my mind on something, lately its baking bread, I want what I want and I want it NOW.  I just returned from shopping and bought a bread/pizza board.  Rye and wheat flour, and more white, as well as instant yeast.  Think I mentioned somewhere else that I'm going to try conventional bread while my starter is doing its thing.  Had to hold myself back so as not to buy too much.  Jar of yeast said it'd make 16 loaves. 

 

Steph

jm_chng's picture
jm_chng


Well that's enthusiasm, that's not a bad thing. I'm exactly the same. I give it my all. It's good you'll learn lots. Just don't burn out that's the only danger. You'll be fine though I'm sure. 

Jim

sadears's picture
sadears

Well, I started my traditional bread.  Tried to put more water in.  Seemed too gooy.  However you spell that word.  Ended up adding more flour.  Tried your flap and fold, then since I tried that for several minutes, I decided to let it set for a bit.  Always read that you shouldn't handle it too much.  I'm going back to it when I finish this post.  I noticed in your video the sides of your bowl were clean.  Is that a clue that it's got just the right amount of flour v. liquid?  Because of the altitude, I didn't want to put all the flour called for in the recipe. 

 

Steph