The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Anyone got a recipe for Wegglitag?

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bakersteve's picture
bakersteve

Anyone got a recipe for Wegglitag?

Has anyone got a recipe for Wegglitag? These are a Swiss breakfast roll that (if I have identified the species correctly) I can remember my mother and I fighting over in Interlaken in the 60s (there was a bakery just behind the hotel). They were absolutely amazing, and like nothing we had ever tasted before. In a mixed basket of rolls there was usually only one (hence the fight). They were shaped like little lemons.


Steve

Kuret's picture
Kuret

I have a recipe for a bread caled Weggli wich I assume is the same as your bread. Try this recipe but be warned: This author has a wierd habit of uber dry doughs wich Is why I never ever ever bake from his book.


Weggli:


Type: "Flying sponge", enriched DDT: 27C or 80F


25g of fresh yeast, 500g milk, 10g honey, 900g bread flour, 100g butter, 20g salt.


Flying sponge: Mix milk, honey, yeast and half of the bread flour into a loose batter, let ripen for 30 minutes (if using instant yeast add 15minutes or so to allow the yeast cells to wake up)


Dough: Mix together sponge with remaining ingredients, knead until good gluten is developed. Let ferment for 60 minutes, fold once and ferment 30 minutes more.


after fermentation divide into 50g rolls and let them proof in pairs (i suppose this is intended for them to proof into each other) on floured cloth for 30 minutes, now take a rolling pin and firmly press down the middle of each "bun pair", let proof for another 30 minutes.


Bake at 230C(450F) for 12 minutes with steam, you may glaze them with eggs but if you do so then drop the steaming as this dulls the shine of the egg wash.

bakersteve's picture
bakersteve

Thanks to Kuret for this. I'm late back here as I've been laid low with a bug.


As others have commented, 'Weggli' seems to be a generic term in Swiss German for a small roll. Dredging my memory, there seemed to be something special and magical about these, but maybe it was just that at the time (1960s Britain) we'd never tasted an enriched dough.


I will try the recipe, which seems very close to my own for Zopf; others involve eggs as well. On a hunch, I think the 'special magic' might have been a touch of vanilla, or maybe they were just small Pains Veinnoises. Whatever, it will be a lot of fun trying to find out.

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

What the heck is a "Flying Sponge"?

JavaGuy's picture
JavaGuy

And just where do you get enriched DDT?

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

A flying sponge is one that contains enough yeast to be ready for use in a short time (2-5 hours), per The Students Technology of Breadbaking and Flour Confectionery by Wilfred James Fance.


 


DDT is Desired Dough Temperature


 


Paul

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Oh, got it...


So the sponge does not have wings...  and DDT is not the stuff that keeps mosquitos away...

Kuret's picture
Kuret

I lost a comma there I see.. Bot however as previously stated "flying sponge" is a preferment with all the yeast called for in the formula, It is a method that was quite common in britain during the early 1900´s I think, I suspect that it was mostly a proofing kind of thing to check if the yeast was still viable but It does give bread a small amount of prefermented taste.