The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Storing Bread

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titus's picture
titus

Storing Bread

I have a question for you all about how you store your bread.

I usually just slice and freeze my bread, but I am starting on a food elimination diet for migraines that requires that homemade bread be at least one day old before eating.

I don't have a breadbox and don't want to buy one, as I have a tiny European kitchen and don't want to have another "thing" to occupy my already limited space.

Any good ideas on how to keep my bread out a day or so before freezing without it getting stale?

sewwhatsports's picture
sewwhatsports

I have found with the sourdoughs that it is better to let then sit 12-24 hours before I cut them.  The crumb stabilizes and the flavor develops better with the time. I then just put them in a plastic bag that I bought from the Baker's Catalog and they stay well for many days.  Sourdough seems to enhance the staying power of the bread.  HTH 

Rena in Delaware

titus's picture
titus

Thanks Rena.

I don't make sourdough (and it's forbidden on this diet).
I guess what you said would apply to regular bread as well?

So, do you just leave it out uncovered for a day?

Darkstar's picture
Darkstar

Titus,

 

This site is a great resource but you may find a lot of the questions you have others have already asked.  A search would have turned up a previous post with the answer in it.

 

I hope the day rest will make it so you can eat bread!  Good luck to you! 

 

 

titus's picture
titus

Thanks, Darkstar!

Do I feel like a doofus for not doing a search! I apologize.

Only goes to show that I really shouldn't try to post in the throes of a migraine!

donnas4girls's picture
donnas4girls

If you are baking enriched loaves with a softer crusts such as whites or whole wheats  I let them cool completely then wrap them in saran wrap in both directions.Mine will stay fresh for several days at room temperature.

Lean artisan breads with a crisp crust I place in a brown paper bag.

I hope this helps.

Darkstar's picture
Darkstar

TItus,

 

My intention wasn't to make you feel like a doofus, rather it was to speak to all the lurkers. Floyd has created a great site and all those that gather here either learn something, share knowledge, and sometimes both. (if you're not careful ;) Read through the lessons, check out the FAQ section, dig into the recipes...Lurk for all it's worth! :) You may just come out of it with the new found ability to bake bread or to bake BETTER bread; IMHO that's what it's all about!

 

Darkstar

mountaindog's picture
mountaindog

I've been finding that even my rustic sourdoughs get too stale too quickly in the brown paper bags, so have been using aluminum foil instead...seems to keep the crust crisper than in plastic but not get as dried out as in paper. Enriched breads or rolls I store in a ziploc type bags. I guess the answer for you may rely on why the fresh bread has to be a day old before you can eat it? That may better determine how you store it.

titus's picture
titus

Thanks donnas4girls and mountaindog for your suggestions.

mountaindog, I'm not sure why the bread has to be a day old -- it's just what this particular migraine diet recommends. In fact, I was even wondering if my method of freezing it fresh would still be OK, but since I can't find any other info than the statement in the doctor's book, I'm just going to stick with his recommendation (he's a neurology professor at Johns Hopkins, so I guess he knows his stuff).

It's obviously something to do with the yeast, but why the one day delay is beyond me. The book says that supermarket bread would be OK, but sourdough is forbidden altogether and home made bread is OK with the caveat of the one-day "rest".

I'm really at my wit's end with my migraines and am ready to try anything -- and this diet restriction is going to be none too easy, but my back is against the wall.

Wish me luck, y'all!

tony's picture
tony

I use a relatively inexpensive breadbox to store bread for daily use. When a loaf gets moldy I shake out the crumbs and rub the inner surfaces of the box with vinegar. I've found that bread in a brown bag in the breadbox seems like the best way.

 

For freezing, I read somewhere that it's best to double-bag a loaf and to thaw it completely before taking out of the plastic, so all the moisture is reabsorbed by the bread. The point of double-bagging is to prevent or hinder the separation of crust from crumb that sometimes happens with frozen bread.

sewwhatsports's picture
sewwhatsports

When I do regular bread I do let it sit a day to cool well and stabalize the crumb.  Sometimes it is nice to jump right in with a warm loaf but I have really been trying to get in the habit of letting it cool completely.  I have found that it makes it so much easier to slice as well. 

When I freeze bread, I cut my slices and thread them in wax paper. I cut a long piece-maybe 2 feet or so- and then cut it in half lengthwise.  I then lay the first slice down on  paper, fold the paper over, lay 2nd slice then the paper, etc.  That makes it easier to remove just a few slices at a time.  I do wrap it all with saran wrap and then put in a plastic bag/ziploc bag.  Maybe that can help for you.

As for why homemade bread has to sit, the yeast, will dissapate in the 24 hours and then there would be less of a chance to trigger your migraines. Sourdough, the yeast stays longer in the bread with bacteria that causes the sour flavor.. 

As I am sure you know, anything fermented can trigger your headaches..

Rena in Delaware

titus's picture
titus

Thanks Rena:

Do you wrap your bread in a towel when it's sitting out, or do you wrap it in plastic wrap or tin foil as has been suggested? Or, do you just leave it out butt-nekkid?

I don't want to go to the trouble of making a loaf only to have it stale.

Like you, I usually freeze bread. I usuallly slice and then double bag it. With this new diet, I plan to leave the bread out a day and then freeze it as usual. I've just never let bread sit out before, and hence the dumb question!

sewwhatsports's picture
sewwhatsports

Titus-

Not a dumb question.  I leave my bread butt-nekkid on the counter when I let it sit.  I have not seen my breads get stale faster either.  I do have to say that I do a lot of sourdoughs but with my regular sandwich bread, I like to let it sit because the loaf firms up wonderfully and it is so much easier to cut. 

If you are doing sandwich breads you might want to look into a Pullman pan.  It makes a nice dense square loaf that has a close crumb and is wonderful to slice, 

If there is anything else I can do to help please let me know :) 

Rena in Delaware