The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Loaves sticking to pyrex loaf pans

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afjagsp123's picture
afjagsp123

Loaves sticking to pyrex loaf pans

I've recently jumped on the "down to basics" bandwagon. I stopped using spray oils like Pam, and bought a Misto, and loaded it with olive oil. Like everyone else, just trying to save money wherever we can! (the Misto was only $9.99 at Bed, Bath & Beyond, and think about the cost of a can of Pam -- $3 or so? Would pay for itself in a few months...)

I had used my trusty Pyrex loaf pans without a single problem for all kinds of yeast and quick breads as long as I used Pam. But now that I've stopped using Pam, the bread sticks LIKE CRAZY. I almost cried on Sunday when after all that work, my white white loaves stuck in the Pyrex. Half of each loaf was left in the bottom, even after I ran an offset spatula all the way around, and even up under the bottom, just to get the bread to unglue itself from the pan.

Any ideas? I guess I could go back to Pam, but I hated the way it left that gluey residue on everything (what is that??? it doesn't seem like it could be good for you...).

Is the the olive oil the problem? What about Canola, or just buttering or using (blech) shortening?

Thanks!

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I spray my loaf pans with oil and then use either quick oats or cornmeal in the pan, making sure to get on the bottom and in the corners. I've heard rice flour also works well.

I,also, just bought a Misto and have some liquid lecithin. I'm wondering if the lecithin will work in the Misto,as the lecithin seems thick.I just posted a query on that today in the "Gear" column. 

There is a release formula on this site (just search lecithin") that is 1 part lecithin, 2 parts oil-blenderized and refirgerated and used to oil bread pans. 

Grandpa Larry's picture
Grandpa Larry

I grease my pyrex with Crisco. Nothing sticks and it leaves none of the residue of the sprays. Makes a nice crisp crust too.

I've not noticed off flavors.

Russ's picture
Russ

From what I've heard, I think lecithin is necessary to prevent sticking, and that it will clog your Misto. I've been trying to figure out a solution to this for awhile myself.

My current plan is to try to get a little jar with a brush built into the top so that I can keep an oil/lecithin mixture in it and use the brush for greasing loaf pans.

Russ

afjagsp123's picture
afjagsp123

I just broke down and bought another can of Pam (well, generic brand). I need to make a successful loaf of bread! It's been a week! Thanks for your help. And oh, lecithin is the second ingredient in my can of cooking spray.

Stephanie in Very Hot Almost Mexico
Visit my blog: http://bikebookandbread.blogspot.com/

Patf's picture
Patf

I use loaf liners made of parchment. Not a cheap way to do it, but it works and they can be re-used a few times. But I'm having difficulty sourcing them now, as I think silicone baking tins have taken over. Pat.

helend's picture
helend

I have never lined/oiled a bread tin but did finally throw out one tin when all of a suddden bread started to stick no matter what - you could try sprinkling the inside of the tin (or the bread with flour - I do when cooking pizza.

holds99's picture
holds99

First I let me say I may get some flak on this but I have a bias against Pyrex for baking.  My experience with Pyrex is that it bakes hotter than a good, heavy, metal bread pan.  The Pyrex heat factor can cause scorching, which means that if you use Pyrex you should adjust the oven temp. downward about 10-15 deg., depending on the oven temp. called for in your recipe and the type bread you're baking.  

That being said, if you don't want to incur the expense of buying Pam and use Pyrex you might consider using a pastry brush dipped in oil (vegetable, canola, olive oil) and coat the inside of the glass, then lightly dust the inside of the Pyrex with flour before placing your dough into it.

Howard

thebakerlady's picture
thebakerlady

I also do not use Pyrex for bread baking (with the exception of some quick breads). You know that you must decrease the temperature of the oven by 25 degrees when using glass pans. Stoneware, however, is a favorite for baking all types of bread, and no temperature decrease is necessary.

For the sticking problem, try greasing your pan as usual, then sprinkle some flour in the pan and knock each corner of the pan against your hand or the counter to get the flour evenly distributed. Dump out any flour that does not stick. I would not oil the loaf itself before baking (unless you oil the top only). This tip works very well for cakes. I see no reason it wouldn't work as well for bread.

(I meant to post a reply to the original question but couldn't see where to do it.) Sorry if I have just repeated earlier suggestions.

Peggy 

Eli's picture
Eli

Peter Reinhart suggest using a mixture of butter and flour...Think he mentions it in Crust and Crumb and he may have melted them together and painted the pan...I will see if I can find the notation and report back. Seems as if it was 1 part butter to 3 parts flour.

 

SFLAOMFS's picture
SFLAOMFS

When I make my Buckwheat Pancakes I add coconut oil to the batter and spray the Pyrex pan with olive oil, canola oil, and or more coconut oil. I am liberal with the oil, and the heat is on medium low, but my pancakes stick regardless of the oil used in the pan. I have this problem with the Pyrex pan and a Circulon pan. Should I try Pam?

suave's picture
suave

There's this thing made out equal parts of oil, shortening (or other solid fat) and flour, that my friend taught me to make and it is the best non-stick coating I've ever seen.  I think here it's been mentioned several times before as well.  You just whip it together with a hand mixer and store on the shelf.  I use it for uncoated aluminum loaf pans and breads just fall out.

Mike

holds99's picture
holds99

Good information, appreciate the tip.

Howard

karladiane's picture
karladiane

Hi there:

I always use a spray canola oil from Spectrum Organics on my Pyrex pans, and I have never had any sticking problems. This particular product is for high temperature cooking, and although I don't like the waste of a disposable can, I have been using the same can since March, and I'm still using it.  I also don't really like shopping at Whole Foods, but that is the only place I can find it.  Good Luck.

Karla P.

afjagsp123's picture
afjagsp123

Ooooh, thanks. I didn't think of a more natural spray. I have a great store here in Almost Mexico that sells Spectrum. (I had tried spectrum canola oil in my Misto without success.)

Stephanie in Very Hot Almost Mexico
Visit my blog: http://bikebookandbread.blogspot.com/

karladiane's picture
karladiane

Hi there:

 I hope you have good luck with the Spectrum Canola.  Be sure to get the one specified for High Heat.  I don't know if it would make a difference if it wasn't that one, but that's the one I have used with good results.  I have never used sprays for baking with flour added to them - I wonder if they're good too?

ciao!

KP

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

Quote:
There's this thing made out equal parts of oil, shortening (or other solid fat) and flour, that my friend taught me to make and it is the best non-stick coating I've ever seen. I think here it's been mentioned several times before as well. You just whip it together with a hand mixer and store on the shelf. I use it for uncoated aluminum loaf pans and breads just fall out. -Mike

Original post with recipe & instructions can be found on TFL at this link


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4561/aarggh-need-some-help-here-cold-start-baking#comment-22960

baltochef's picture
baltochef

In my first bakery job we called a mixture of equal parts Hi-Tex shortening and patent flour by the totally original and unsexy name of "flour grease"..Dead simple to make..Just weigh out equal parts shortening and flour into a mixer, add a paddle, turn it on low, and mix until the flour is evenly incorporated into the shortening..We mixed up enough to halfway fill a 20 qt. mixer, and stored it in a 4 gallon plastic bucket with a tight fitting lid..The working mixture was kept in a #10 can with a round, 1" diameter, natural bristle paint brush as an applicator..Works as good as anything I have ever used..It is not sexy, and is slower to use than pan spray..It causes no harm to the environment, as there are NO propellants involved..One could grease pans for an entire year's worth of everyday baking for a mere fraction of the cost necessary to purchase aerosol pan spray that would grease an equivalent number of pans..


Bruce

xaipete's picture
xaipete

This works great (from Laurel's Bread Book):


1/2 cup lecithin and 1 cup liquid vegetable oil blended in the blender; keep in the refrigerator.


I use this in pyrex pans and nothing ever sticks. You can use liquid or granualted lecithin. I prefer the liquid because when I made it with granulated I had to stir the mixture every time I went to use it.


--Pamela

xaipete's picture
xaipete

This works great (from Laurel's Bread Book):


1/2 cup lecithin and 1 cup liquid vegetable oil blended in the blender; keep in the refrigerator.


I use this in pyrex pans and nothing ever sticks. You can use liquid or granualted lecithin. I prefer the liquid because when I made it with granulated I had to stir the mixture every time I went to use it.


--Pamela

damnbaker's picture
damnbaker

I use Pyrex and just brush on olive oil.  When the bread is cooked I use a butter knife to pry the loaf out gently.  Sometimes I find a tiny bit of sticking on the very bottom of the loaf.  I think I'll have to try dusting them with flour too.

kristine's picture
kristine

I generally bake my white loaves in pyrex.  I've always greased my pans with butter only, no added flour. My loaves pop right out.   I tried oil once and my loaves stuck.   I use maybe a teaspoon of butter per pan.