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The Great Baguette quest N°3: Anis Bouabsa

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Janedo's picture
Janedo

The Great Baguette quest N°3: Anis Bouabsa

Tuesday morning, we decided to go visit the Duc de la Chapelle, Anis Bouabsa's bakery in Paris. As you probably know, he won this year's Best Baguette. The bakery is situated in a modest neighborhood, far from the typical tourist traps and chic areas. We entered the bakery and asked he woman behind the counter several questions before buying a selection of breads. She was very nice and helpful. As we left the bakery, we took some pictures of the young baker/apprenti who was scoring baguettes and sliding them in to the oven. Disappointed by the quality of the photos through the window, Florence returned and asked if we could go inside and take just a few pictures. The woman showed her the way, no questions asked!

Once inside, who came through, but Anis himself! I felt like a teenager who was getting a real-live view of her movie star hero. He looked at me through the window and asked Flo who I was. I think he thought I was a bit idiotic because I had such a huge grin on my face! He opened the door and told me to come on in.

So, here you have two passionate home bakers in front of a master, and may I say the sweetest, nicest and most generous master. We started asking him questions and he told us EVERYTHING! He explained from A to Z how he makes his famous baguette. He adapted the recipe for home use for us and explained how we could do the steps at home. He showed us how to form the baguettes, slide them in the oven, what temperature.... EVERYTHING!

We even asked him if we could come and have a real lesson and he didn't say no, he said in September it could be possible.

Now, what he told us was actually quite surprising! The baguette dough has a 75% hydration, very little yeast, hardly kneaded, folded three times in one hour then placed in the fridge 21hrs. They are not fully risen when placed in the oven, it is the wet dough and the very very hot oven (250°C) that make give the volume. 

When I get some time, I will be trying his recipe. I feel success is near!!!!

Anis gave me permission to publish his pictures. They were all taken by Florence, "photographe extraordinaire".

Jane  

Anis Bouabsa

 ExplanationsExplanations

Baguettes à cuireBaguettes à cuire

OvenOven

BaguettesBaguettes

 

Comments

holds99's picture
holds99

Rudy,

The original formula sounds like it's classified "top secret".  Maybe the Cone of Silence is in order...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLZKEre3yJ0

Howard - St. Augustine, FL

Janedo's picture
Janedo

OK, Howard, you are funny!

Rudy,

When David recipe posted his recipe, it was exactly what Anis explained to me, so I didn't have anything to add, that's all. David is good at deducing.

Jane 

 

dougal's picture
dougal

That ringing noise is coming from Howard's shoe...

 

T65 is going to give a bit more flavour than white bread or a/p flour.

Its got a touch of wholemeal in there. But not with big flakes of bran.

So I'd suggest sifting some whole grain flour through a fine-ish kitchen seive. If lots of bran is left in the seive, but the flour can be shaken through, then that's about fine enough.

And I'd then suggest mixing 1 part of this seived stuff with 2, 3 or even 4 parts of your white to create a preudo-T65. The little bit of bran (and the wheatgerm) makes a worthwhile difference to flavour.

And a tiny tiny tiny pinch of rye (like 1% or less, thats less than 5g in 500g) honestly wouldn't hurt either!

holds99's picture
holds99

Appreciate you posting a formula for "psuedo-T65".  I'll add your procedure/formula  to David's notes, which I have compiled and plan to study and use for a baguette test run in the near future for non-sourdough baguettes.

Got to run...my shoe is ringing :>)

Howard - St. Augustine, FL

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Dougal.

What do you think about adding some high extraction flour to AP or Bread Flour to accomplish the same thing?

Also, the folks at KAF once told me that their "European Artisan Flour" is supposed to be a T-65 clone, if memory serves. Any experience or thoughts about this?


David

dougal's picture
dougal

Being in the UK, I have no experience of the US flour brands or specific products.

 

Here in the UK, our "wholemeal" flours generally have quite a lot of the bran as rather coarsely ground flakes.

I've come across mention of this French stuff called "remoulage" which is really finely (re)milled bran. Which has got me thinking that one of the reasons for differences in the water uptake of different wholemeal flours is likely to be a difference in the fineness of the bran milling.

And I don't know how fine the bran might be in any of your flours!

 

My understanding is that a T45 cake flour has almost zero bran+germ. Yet it still could come in at up to 0.50% ash after incineration, say 0.45% for my example). A T150 would be whole grain with more than 1.40% (lets say 1.45%) residual ash.

So cake to whole grain makes 1% difference to the residual ash.

T65 is 0.62 to 0.75% residual ash. Lets say 0.70%. And T55 is 0.50 to 0.60% - so say 0.55%

We want T65 @ 0.70 which is 0.25 up our T45 and 0.15 up on the T55.

Hence if we take A/P as T55, we want to add about 15% whole grain to approximate T65.

But we want that to be the finer (not the coarse) bran, so its not obvious and not giving any problems with weight or gluten cutting.

So I'm suggesting seiving out the coarse stuff, and adding more of the whole grain to still get close to the T65 spec.

The proportion of wholegrain you need depends on how finely your bran is milled, and on your seive! So I'm just suggesting a method rather than a precise formula. If you remove half the bran, then you want about 30% of the seived stuff in your mix - 70% A/P, 30% seived - a little more than 2 to 1. But note that it depends on how much of the bran you think you might be removing as to what proportion to mix...

 

If you can get an entirely stoneground whole grain flour, you'll get the potential for the maximum flavour from the wheat because you know you have got all the wheatgerm. The only downside is the short storage life of that wheatgerm.

And a pinch of rye (like the odd drop of Worcester Sauce when cooking) just adds depth to the flavour without drawing attention to its identity.

Seived stoneground wholemeal is one of my favourite flours. (Even if it does leave an astonishing volume - though not much weight, like 12% - of bran!)

BTW - the hole size on my seive looks to be very close to 1mm (say 1/25 of an inch).

 

If the only remaining concern about those baguettes is a slight blandness in the flavour, then adding a pinch of rye and 'some' seived wholemeal really ought to do the trick.

josordoni's picture
josordoni

Dougal, have you had any experience with sieving rye? 

if not, I think I might try it this weekend.

 Lynne

dougal's picture
dougal

Not yet!

But I don't see any harm in trying to 'lighten' some rye flour, if that's what you want.

BTW - the english millers' term for 'seiving' is "bolting". So I'm advocating the use of a little bolted stoneground wholemeal... 

josordoni's picture
josordoni

I'm not sure really that I do necessarily want to lighten it - I just wondered what it might do to the rise, so I shall experiment for the sake of experimentation. :D

Lexicographical comment:  Bolting used to use coarse cloth , instead of the varying nylon screens I believe are used today.  I also found a reference to "dressing" the flour in a bolting cloth on one of the flour sites.

dougal's picture
dougal

AFAIK "light rye" has relatively little (rye) bran whereas "dark rye" flour is wholegrain rye (or very close to it).

Hence sifting out some bran => 'lighter' rye.

josordoni's picture
josordoni

When I said "lighten" I meant "less heavy" lighten rather than the colour, so I am probably working on the same lines as you, in sifting out some bran = less heavy bread.

LOL and we are both speaking UKEnglish, goodness only knows what differences USEnglish has to add! 

 Lynne

 

dougal's picture
dougal

Quote:
But I don't see any harm in trying to 'lighten' some rye flour, if that's what you want.
I was trying to indicate both paler and less weight to lift!

By the same method of sifting out some bran.  

 

Less bran, less to lift, should be easier to get the thing to rise.

Less bran, lighter colour, and sold like that as "light rye".

 

Hence, sift out bran, get paler rye flour and maybe an easier rise.

But remember that rye doesn't contribute any gluten...  

Sifting my "medium rye" leaves some very odd 'bran' - rather like a dirty fine oatmeal, very different to the wheat bran. 

C B Findlay's picture
C B Findlay

Thank you so much for creating and continuing this thread! I have one question for Jane. I've been taking it for granted until a second ago that Mr. Buoabsa used steam in his baking. But did he?

Janedo's picture
Janedo

Yes, he used steam. His oven s a modern deck oven with steam perfectly controlled. 

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

Jane, 

You've been missed. Welcome back.

Hopefully we'll all have the pleasure of more of your baking adventures.

Bien Cordialment, Wild-Yeast

 

Janedo's picture
Janedo

Thanks! Baking over here as been delicious but pretty simple. I have found a flour I really love and pretty much bake two types of bread very regularly, semi whole wheat baguettes for hubby and pain au levain because I love it. But this summer, as I am headed over to North America, I will definitely have to do some baking with the notorious american flour! I can't wait. 

I promise to show the pain au levain soon. 

Jane

R2D2B's picture
R2D2B

Hi everyone,

I understand this is an old thread, but I wanted to thank the Janedo and Dmsnyder for making this wonderful recipe available to the fresh loaf community. I have been looking for a good baguette recipe for some time and this one works just great! Great taste, soft and holey crumb, perfect crust.. 
For those in the UK, I have tried the recipe with Dove's Farm Organic Bread Flour and also with Allinson Strong Flour. Both worked fine and the bread in the pictures was obtained with Dove's flour. 


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'm happy the Bouabsa formula works for you. We had a lot of fun playing with it after Jane's visit with Anis.

David

Swissbread's picture
Swissbread

Organic T 65 From FranceGot 40 x 55lb (25KG) Bags of BIO (Organic) T65 Flour which I imported from France.

Willing to share some.

 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

how much per bag?  And where are you located?

Paul

Swissbread's picture
Swissbread

$ 1.75 per lb.  / $96.25 per 55 lb. bag.  I am located in Florida

cessnabmw's picture
cessnabmw

Please can you help me with this recipe? Can't seem to find it here. Am new on this forum. Thanks!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

See this: Anis Bouabsa ficelles

Happy baking!

David

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